PLATINUM2024

Wildlife Rescue League

aka WRL   |   Falls Church, VA   |  www.wildliferescueleague.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Wildlife Rescue League

EIN: 52-1419298


Mission

Wildlife Rescue League is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization based in Northern Virginia whose mission is to support the rehabilitation and release of sick, injured, and orphaned wildlife and, through education, to foster the appreciation of our wild neighbors. WRL operates a wildlife helpline in Northern Virginia and surrounding areas and provides advice and referrals to permitted wildlife rehabilitators to get animals the help they need for a second chance at life. WRL also educates the public about native wildlife and peaceful coexistence; thereby minimizing the need for rehabilitation efforts. We provide brochures, educational material, classes and educational programs upon request. If you find an animal in need of assistance, call WRL's Wildlife Helpline at (703) 440-0800 for advice.

Ruling year info

1985

Acting and Vice President, Treasurer

Ms. Beth Axelrod

Secretary, Board of Directors

Mr. Phil Church

Main address

PO Box 704

Falls Church, VA 22040 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1419298

Subject area info

Bird preservation

Endangered species protection

Wildlife rehabilitation

Wildlife sanctuaries

Animal rescue and rehabilitation

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Adults

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Helpline

Wildlife Rescue League operates a Wildlife Helpline that accepts calls from the public seeking assistance for sick, injured or orphaned wildlife. Calls are triaged and callers are referred to licensed rehabilitators located throughout Northern Virginia and surrounding areas, with the goal of rehabilitating and releasing them back into their native habitat. Over 8,400 calls were received in 2022.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Wildlife Rescue League educates the public about Virginia's native wildlife through the distribution of informative brochures, the publication of quarterly newsletters, public service announcements and by hosting educational seminars and classes.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Wildlife Rescue League provides financial support to our member rehabilitators to include supplies such as food, formula, caging, reimbursement for veterinary costs and vaccines. We also provide educational presentations and classes to allow rehabilitators to accumulate the required CEU.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Numbers of callers helped on the Wildlife Helpline

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Wildlife Helpline

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Amount of rehabilitation supplies distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Public Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Wildlife Rescue League's goals are to increase the number of permitted wildlife rehabilitators in the region by offering incentives and providing rehabilitation opportunities as well as training and education. WRL is standardizing it's training in an effort to recruit additional helpline and transporter volunteers to handle the large volume of calls the Wildlife Helpline receives every year. WRL has recognized the need to establish a wildlife center in Northern Virginia and is taking steps to secure a location and funding to realize that endeavor.

WRL is making an effort to recruit wildlife rehabilitators by designing a new brochure specifically to target people who enjoy wildlife and nature, and is contacting the veterinary industry to promote the importance of working with wildlife to conserve species. WRL is offering to provide starter supplies to new rehabilitators as well as reimbursements for vaccines that are required for rabies vector species such as bats and foxes. WRL is working on securing a location to establish a centralized facilitity to triage and stabilize wildlife that is brought in by the public, animal shelters and animal control officers.

WRL has been in the wildlife rehabilitation industry for 38 years and networks with area veterinarians, wildlife rehabilitators, nature centers and park systems and wildlife centers. We will use those relationships as well as undertake a capital campaign to raise funds to establish a wildlife center.

WRL received 8,400 calls to the Wildlife Helpline and successfully referred animals to area rehabilitators and veternary partners. WRL has recruited 130 volunteers and is continuing recruitment efforts. Funding and assets increased in 2021, and a part-time consultant was identified to assist with additional efforts for 2022. We have also located two potential opportunities to secure a location for a wildlife center.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Wildlife Rescue League
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

180.71

Average of 310.12 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

79.1

Average of 80.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Wildlife Rescue League

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wildlife Rescue League

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wildlife Rescue League

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Wildlife Rescue League’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $61,463 $45,128 $40,816 $64,867 $24,332
As % of expenses 223.5% 180.1% 133.9% 144.1% 41.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $61,463 $45,128 $40,816 $64,867 $24,332
As % of expenses 223.5% 180.1% 133.9% 144.1% 41.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $88,969 $70,181 $71,309 $109,893 $83,052
Total revenue, % change over prior year 154.4% -21.1% 1.6% 54.1% -24.4%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 3.6% 4.8% 3.3% 1.0% 4.0%
Investment income 1.3% 2.5% 0.3% 0.0% 2.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 94.1% 91.4% 96.5% 97.9% 92.8%
Other revenue 1.1% 1.3% 0.0% 1.2% 1.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $27,505 $25,053 $30,493 $45,026 $58,720
Total expenses, % change over prior year 27.1% -8.9% 21.7% 47.7% 30.4%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Professional fees 2.1% 0.0% 8.5% 15.2% 25.7%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 97.9% 100.0% 91.5% 84.8% 74.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $27,505 $25,053 $30,493 $45,026 $58,720
One month of savings $2,292 $2,088 $2,541 $3,752 $4,893
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $29,797 $27,141 $33,034 $48,778 $63,613

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 95.5 125.5 117.9 96.9 79.1
Months of cash and investments 95.5 125.5 117.9 96.9 79.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 95.6 126.6 120.0 98.6 80.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $218,850 $262,085 $299,506 $363,722 $387,257
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.3% 0.6% 1.4% 1.0% 0.5%
Unrestricted net assets $219,088 $264,216 $305,032 $369,899 $394,231
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $219,088 $264,216 $305,032 $369,899 $394,231

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Acting and Vice President, Treasurer

Ms. Beth Axelrod

Beth has a long history of volunteering for wildlife and animal protection groups, and became involved with WRL as a Helpline volunteer in 2007. She has served on the Board of Directors since 2011, and as President from 2013-2017. Beth currently serves as Acting and Vice President and Treasurer, as well as chairing the Wildlife Center Task Force. Prior to retiring, Beth had a 30 year career in Real Estate Management and was the Vice President of a real estate development firm. She managed projects from start to completion and focused on team management and training, ensuring statutory compliance with multi-jurisdictional condominium acts, and that construction standards met the specifications of contractual documents. Beth also prepared operating budgets for multiple projects, served on all Declarant Board of Directors, prepared financial reports for investors and represented the Developer in negotiations regarding legal issues. She recently became a Class I permitted reptile rehab

Secretary, Board of Directors

Phil Church

Mr. Church is a graduate of Ohio State University and spent over 32 years working for the Defense Logistics Agency as a logistics and contracting specialist, focusing largely on procurement automation. He has been the At Large representative to the Fairfax County Animal Services Advisory Commission since 2001 with time as Chair, Vice-chair, and Secretary. In addition to other humane organization work he was a primary member of Humane Deer Management which was a key partner in the five year deer spay effort in Fairfax City, VA. He has been a member of the Mantua Citizens’ Association Board since 2010 and joined the WRL Board of Directors in Dec 2020.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Wildlife Rescue League

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Wildlife Rescue League

Board of directors
as of 01/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Beth Axelrod

Wildlife Rescue League

Term: 2023 - 2024

Phil Church

Wildlife Rescue League

Elena Bailey

Wildlife Rescue League

Elissa Myers

Wildlife Rescue League

Casey Nolan

Wildlife Rescue League

Jennifer Rokasky

Wildlife Rescue League

Tami Dennis

Wildlife Rescue League

Jessica Andersen

Wildlife Rescue League

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.