PLATINUM2024

FAITH IN ACTION

Neighbors Helping Neighbors Since 1998

Fairfield, CA   |  www.faithinactionsolano.org
GuideStar Charity Check

FAITH IN ACTION

EIN: 68-0431992


Mission

The mission of Faith in Action: Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers of Solano County is to promote the independence, end the isolation, and sustain the dignity of homebound frail elders, seniors with cancer and other chronic illnesses, seniors with disabilities, the medically uninsured, and their family caregivers throughout Solano County

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

The Rev. Robert T. Fuentes D.D.

Main address

3303 Whitemarsh Lane

Fairfield, CA 94534 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0431992

Subject area info

In-home aid and personal assistance

Paratransit

Special population support

Population served info

Widows and widowers

Caregivers

Ethnic and racial groups

Economically disadvantaged people

People with diseases and illnesses

NTEE code info

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Transportation (Free or Subsidized) (P52)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Solano County has seen an increase in the senior population. The number of seniors 60 years and older now outpace the number of live births per year, with the highest population be seniors over the age of 85. One in nine seniors live with food insecurity; more than 50% of the homeless population is comprised of seniors, mainly women. The number of seniors living with isolation is a growing health concern. Faith in Action has served this population for 26 years, recruiting volunteers who are matched with seniors living alone and in isolation. The programs that the agency offers also include a Basic Needs fund to assist seniors who are homeless or with resources to help with medications, food, and utilities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Overview

Faith in Action's programs include:
1) the Caregiver Respite Program, which matches volunteers 1-to-1 with care receivers (frail elders, persons with chronic illness). Services include transport to and from medical and social service appointments, help in grocery shopping and meal preparation, light house and yard work, home visitation, phone reassurance, and caregiver respite.
2)Ride with Pride provides transportation to homebound seniors who no longer drive. The Ride with Pride Program uses vans to transport to medical appointments, grocery stores, banks, and leisurely activities.
3). The Senior Peer Counseling Program is a pilot project that will provide both group and individual peer counseling to seniors with mental illness.
4.) Fall Prevention: provides Matter of Balance workshops to seniors who have experienced falls and seniors who wish to mitigate injury caused by falls.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Caregivers
Widows and widowers
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides 1:1 assistance to frail, homebound seniors. Services include door-through-door transportation to medical and social service appointments, grocery shopping, bill paying, home visits and phone reassurance calls, meal preparation, yard work, home safety repairs. All services are provided by volunteers,

Population(s) Served

Provides shuttle transportation to seniors in all 7 cities of Solano County. Transport to medical and social service appointments, leisure activities, and other destinations within Solano County. Care receivers make appointment for pick-up at least 24 hours in advance. Suggested donation is $5.00 per ride, although no one turned away for lack of funds

Population(s) Served

1:1 in-home peer counseling to seniors 60 years and over, experiencing the onset of depression sadness, loneliness or anxiety. Also provides in-person group counseling in select parts of the County and virtual group counseling via teleconference calls. Provides transportation to and from mental health providers

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Commendation of Service 2016

Rep. John Garamendi

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Caregivers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Overview

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The agency's volunteers provide assistance to at least 500 care recipients per month. There are about 1023 seniors registered for services "in case of need."

Number of people aged 65+ receiving home care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Older adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Retired people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Out of 1023 senrolled seniors

Number of transportation request fulfilled per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Older adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Retired people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number one request by seniors, primarily to medical appointments, although transportation can be to life enhancement activities.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To assist seniors who are homebound, living in isolation by matching them with a volunteer.

2. To increase the number of active volunteers by 20%; the volunteer pool typically ranges between 125-150 volunteers. Services can be delivered only if a volunteer is available. One volunteer typically helps at least 2 seniors per week. Increasing the number of volunteers will increase the ability to meet the needs of seniors registered with the agency but not yet asking for services.

3. Advocate for the strengthening of safety net for seniors, especially seniors with chronic illnesses and seniors living at the federal poverty level.

The goal of assisting seniors by matching them with volunteers is directly tied to increasing the number of volunteers who remain active in the volunteer pool. To meet this goal, the agency staff underwent extensive training by the Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership, which helps agencies develop extensive plans for volunteer recruitment and retention. Those who undergo this training successful are designated a Service Enterprise. One a scale of 100, the agency scored 95, one of the highest scored by the Center.

The agency has increased its media presence both on social media, such as Facebook, and has increased its radio advertising. The agency also increased the number of hours for its recruiter of volunteers, making it a full-time position. As a result, the number of volunteers recruited has increased by 43%; retention however, is still a recurring issue. The agency has developed a strategy to retain at least 20% of those recruited.

The agency has served in the community for 26 years. Through both its service delivery model and its advocacy for seniors, Faith in Action is a recognized leader for senior services in its county. The agency is able to write for and successfully receive grants and contracts to subsidize the services provided by its volunteers; more than 86% of seniors enrolled live at the federal poverty level. The agency has adequate resources to help meet the 20% goal of retention

The agency has completed the training required by the Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership and is working with its staff to refine the plan for volunteer retention.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

FAITH IN ACTION
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 57.14 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19.4

Average of 7.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

36%

Average of 32% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

FAITH IN ACTION

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAITH IN ACTION

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAITH IN ACTION

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of FAITH IN ACTION’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $32,409 $89,550 $91,891 $261,016 -$46,757
As % of expenses 11.1% 27.6% 24.5% 73.2% -12.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $32,409 $89,550 $91,891 $258,266 -$46,757
As % of expenses 11.1% 27.6% 24.5% 71.9% -12.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $381,697 $502,737 $461,122 $563,081 $324,591
Total revenue, % change over prior year 26.4% 31.7% 0.0% 22.1% -42.4%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 68.5% 72.1% 83.2% 94.3% 93.1%
All other grants and contributions 31.5% 27.9% 16.8% 5.7% 6.9%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $292,108 $324,891 $374,615 $356,400 $370,887
Total expenses, % change over prior year 8.7% 11.2% 0.0% -4.9% 4.1%
Personnel 75.2% 73.4% 73.0% 87.4% 87.3%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 2.1% 2.3% 1.6% 1.7% 1.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 22.7% 24.3% 25.4% 10.9% 11.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $292,108 $324,891 $374,615 $359,150 $370,887
One month of savings $24,342 $27,074 $31,218 $29,700 $30,907
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $46,340 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $316,450 $351,965 $405,833 $435,190 $401,794

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.5 9.8 12.8 20.3 19.4
Months of cash and investments 5.5 9.8 12.8 20.3 19.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.0 6.9 13.9 22.8 20.4
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2020 2021 2022
Cash $133,707 $264,781 $399,634 $603,382 $598,300
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $53,865 $78,695 $36,601 $75,555 $31,767
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.5% 1.3% 1.3% 0.3% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $96,785 $186,335 $0 $676,824 $630,067
Temporarily restricted net assets $89,589 $156,258 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $89,589 $156,258 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $186,374 $342,593 $434,481 $676,824 $630,067

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

The Rev. Robert T. Fuentes D.D.

the Rev. Robert T. Fuentes, D.D. is the Executive Director for Faith in Action, Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers of Solano County. He was the project's first and only director and has served in that capacity since January 1998. He brings to his present work over 31 years' experience in the health field, primarily in mental health and HIV/AIDS.  As Executive Director, he has been responsible for strategic planning, board development, grant writing, and fundraising. Under his leadership, Faith in Action of Solano County has grown from serving its original tri-city area to being a countywide agency. Also under his leadership, Faith in Action has become a known resource in its county of origin, as well as a nationally recognized service organization. Fr. Fuentes continually is motivated to find ways to link faith communities with service providers, believing that faith communities can bridge the gap for those in the most need of services.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

FAITH IN ACTION

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

FAITH IN ACTION

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

FAITH IN ACTION

Board of directors
as of 06/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Wade Askew

Georgia Legal Services

Term: 2024 - 2024

Robert T. Fuentes

Faith in Action

Robert Stalker

Retired Lawyer

Diane Shafer

Shafer Reality and Associates

Chris Silva

Edward Jones

Wade Askew

Legal Services

Jenalee Dawson

CA Human Delopment Corp.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/26/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/20/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.