SILVER2023

Volunteer Action Network

Empowered Women Transforms Societies

San Tan Valley, AZ   |  https://www.vacnetwork.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Volunteer Action Network

EIN: 85-2035898


Mission

Our mission is to be a leading Organization for women empowerment in Uganda enabling women and girls live a productive life with respect and dignity, through improving their income, health and increasing their levels of participation in decision making.

Ruling year info

2021

Development Director

Abdul Wahab Nyonyintono

CEO & Co Founder

Muusa Bukenya

Main address

4150 East Citrine Road

San Tan Valley, AZ 85143 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-2035898

Subject area info

Education

Health

Microfinance

Community development finance

Social enterprise

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Women and girls

Refugees and displaced people

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Single Organization Support (Q11)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women's Economic Empowerment

We build economic independence and increase household income and food income security at the house to support rural and peri-urban poor women in self-selected groups. The members cross guarantee the loans of each other member in the group. By loaning to these groups, we tap into an already supportive and cooperative atmosphere. Each group in a particular village selects a leader to forward her name to the office.The selected leader is provided with leadership training, group dynamics, troubleshooting problems, and conflict resolution among others. After our borrowers receive their micro-loans, Our program addresses the lack of access to finance among women. We want all women to become successful businesswomen and self reliant, so in addition to providing a micro-loan they receive three days of business training. Our training includes adult literacy training, budgeting, inventory control, record keeping, business planning, writing a business plan, and more.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls
Adults
Widows and widowers

We build the capacity of women and girls to have knowledge about SRHR and provide access to menstrual facilities including affordable sanitary products. Providing girls with affordable menstrual hygiene products empowers them to go to school all year round and gives them a better future. When girls are educated, poverty drops, economies thrive, and communities become more resilient. But when a girl faces obstacles in healthily managing her menses, she is at risk for infection, her self-esteem and self-confidence suffer, she may remain absent from school during her period, or, worse still, drop out of school altogether upon reaching puberty. We target schoolgirls ages ten and above, mainly in primary and secondary school and rural women who do not have access. We provide them with a pack (8 pads in a box) of sanitary pads per month and give education sessions on women's health.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We empower women and girls in Uganda by providing spaces and resources to enable them to participate effectively in individual and community development processes, thus, strengthening the economic resilience of individuals, their families, and communities to lead successful and dignified lives.

• To equip women and girls with entrepreneurship skills and knowledge
• To link women and girls to financial institutions
• To provide seed capital to women and girls to invest and advance sustainable businesses
• To strengthen communities to actively participate and access economic programmes
• To expand the production capacity of the Health Period Initiative (HPI) unit
• To provide quality affordable sanitary products
• To provide SRHR education to schools and communities

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people

Financials

Volunteer Action Network

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Development Director

Abdul Wahab Nyonyintono

Volunteer Action Network is a non-governmental and non-profit organization established in 2005 to empower women and girls in Uganda by providing spaces and resources to enable them to participate effectively in individual and community development processes, thus, strengthening the economic resilience of individuals, their families, and communities to lead successful and dignified lives

CEO & Co Founder

Muusa Bukenya

Volunteer Action Network is a non-governmental and non-profit organization established in 2005 to empower women and girls in Uganda by providing spaces and resources to enable them to participate effectively in individual and community development processes, thus, strengthening the economic resilience of individuals, their families, and communities to lead successful and dignified lives

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Volunteer Action Network

Board of directors
as of 06/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Abdul Wahab Nyonyintono

Muusa Bukenya

Volunteer Action Network

Abdelqadir Mahmoud

Volunteer Action Network

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability