SILVER2023

The Night Ministry

Housing, Health Care, Human Connection

Chicago, IL   |  www.thenightministry.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The Night Ministry

EIN: 36-3145764


Mission

Founded in 1976, The Night Ministry is a Chicago-based organization whose mission is to provide human connection, housing support, and health care to members of our community who are unhoused or experiencing poverty. With an open heart and an open mind, we accept people as they are and work to address their immediate physical, emotional and social needs while affirming their sense of humanity. We serve over 4,500 youth and adults every year through our mobile health outreach and youth housing programs.

Ruling year info

1984

President and CEO

Ms. Carol J. Sharp

Main address

1735 North Ashland Avenue Suite 2000

Chicago, IL 60622 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3145764

Subject area info

Health

Human services

Homeless services

Population served info

Families

Economically disadvantaged people

Homeless people

Low-income people

At-risk youth

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, 80,384 Chicagoans were homeless in 2016. Chicago Public Schools identified 18,117 homeless students during the 2016-2017 school year. The longer a young person remains on the street, the less likely it becomes that they will ever attain stable housing and self-sufficiency. Early, intense intervention and age-appropriate shelter is essential to prevent chronic homelessness. The vast majority of homeless individuals have little or no access to safe health care. Conditions that require regular, uninterrupted treatment are extremely difficult to control among those without adequate housing. Homeless adults and youth are more vulnerable to illness, severe weather, injury, robbery, and abuse than their non-homeless peers and have a high prevalence of chronic diseases, along with mental illnesses and substance abuse issues that complicate their condition. The Night Ministry is instrumental in bringing services directly to those in need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Health Outreach Bus

We bring free basic medical care, HIV testing and referrals to homeless and medically vulnerable individuals in diverse neighborhoods across Chicago, via our 38-foot Health Outreach Bus. The custom-designed Health Outreach Bus features a fully equipped nursing office, a confidential space for HIV and STI testing, and hospitality area to greet visitors. The Bus reaches out to individuals and families six days per week in diverse, underserved areas of Chicago.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Street Medicine team - comprised of a Nurse Practitioner, Case Manager, Outreach Worker, and volunteers - goes out on foot with backpacks of medical and survival supplies to serve and treat individuals who have the most trouble accessing health care. Our Street Medicine team reaches individuals in remote areas of the city such as under viaducts and in parks and forest preserves, going to 30+ sites across Chicago into areas from Lower Wacker in the Loop, to Avondale, Chinatown and the Lower West Side.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
People with diseases and illnesses

Our Youth Outreach Team reaches out to homeless teens and young adults living on the street who are not connected to programs in fixed locations or who need additional support. The team provides food, self-care supplies, and other assistance as needed.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

The Crib Overnight Emergency Shelter, located in Lakeview, is our low-threshold “first-step” program that provides homeless youth, ages 18-24, with safe and supportive overnight emergency shelter, as well as life and leadership skills. The Crib is open year round and can shelter up to 21 youth each night.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

At the Response-Ability Pregnant and Parenting Program (RAPPP) homeless young mothers, ages 14-21, and their children receive short-term housing in an environment that fosters stability, responsibility, and positive parenting skills. The RAPPP shelter is located in the neighborhood of Lakeview and consists of a residence with eight beds and eight cribs. RAPPP is unique because it is the only shelter in Chicago that reserves shelter beds for pregnant or parenting teens as young as 14.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

The Interim Housing Program offers homeless youth, ages 14-21, supportive short-term housing and comprehensive case management that promote independent living skills. The program is located in our Open Door Youth Shelter in West Town and provides up to 16 youth with shelter and supportive services at any one time, and cribs are available for the infants/young children of pregnant and parenting youth.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

The STEPS Transitional Living Program provides long-term housing and intensive life skills coaching to homeless youth, ages 16-23. Located at our Open Door Youth Shelter in West Town, the STEPS Program can house up to eight homeless youth at a time. STEPS youth can reside in this transitional housing program for up to 2 years.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

The Night Ministry’s newest housing program, Phoenix Hall, which opened in August 2017, provides safe, stable housing for homeless North Lawndale College Prep high school students to increase their educational outcomes. Unlike traditional housing programs, where youth often stay for shorter periods of time, staff at Phoenix Hall work with the student and their guardian to create a family partnership agreement and obtain guardian’s consent. Students are also welcome to stay as long as they need up until graduation.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Students

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Health Outreach Bus

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Sack lunches or hot meals distributed by staff and volunteers from Health Outreach Bus or Street Medicine team. Many clients reported this was their first meal of the day.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Adolescents, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Combined number of shelter nights provided to young people and their children across five shelter programs.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of individuals served across all Health Outreach and shelter programs.

Number of clients accessing health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of individuals receiving access to health assessment and care through Health Outreach bus and Street Medicine team.

Number of client emergency room visits prevented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Emergency room visits prevented by access to treatment by Street Medicine and Health Outreach bus nurse practitioners saved $699,008 in public health costs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Outreach and Health Ministry Program
Short-term: to provide immediate medical assistance to homeless individuals.
Long-term: to increase the individuals’ ability to manage and improve their own health through the provision of disease management education and support in connecting to primary and mental health care. Our Case Manager also works to connect clients to permanent supportive housing.

Youth Outreach Team
Short-term: to reach out to homeless youth on the streets and provide them with trauma-informed counseling, resources and education.
Long-term: to connect youth with safe, stable housing, opportunities for employment and education, increased life skills, and improved health and wellness.

Youth Housing Programs
Short-term: to provide homeless and precariously-housed youth with safe, stable housing, case management and supportive programming.
Long-term: to provide trauma-informed care to improve the safety, well-being, permanent connections, and self-sufficiency.

The Night Ministry's programs fall under two categories: Youth Services and Health Outreach. The Night Ministry's programs are uniquely effective in assisting our clients through the transition to long-term stability and are all entirely free of charge.

The Night Ministry’s continuum of care for homeless youth includes five youth shelter programs and street outreach. After exiting any of the housing programs, youth are offered ongoing assistance and mentorship through our Aftercare Services.

The Outreach and Health Ministry Program, which includes our Health Outreach Bus and Street Medicine Program, aims to link homeless individuals with a medical home, reducing reliance on the Emergency Room, and move them toward more stable housing. Our mobile approach allows us to focus on neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty and homelessness.

For over 40 years, The Night Ministry has worked tirelessly to advocate for the youth and adults we serve. Our founding President, Tom Behrens, started advocating for homeless youth in the 1980s by serving on the Governor’s Task Force on Homeless Youth and working with state legislators to create laws that would provide funding for homeless youth shelters. On a regular basis, staff at The Night Ministry participate in the following groups: Chicago Coalition for the Homeless Youth Committee; Chicago Alliance to End Homelessness Advocacy Committee; and the City of Chicago Task Force on Homeless Youth. In 2012, the White House named our President and CEO, Paul W. Hamann, a “Champion of Change” for his work to combat youth homelessness. The Night Ministry enjoys a long-standing reputation, locally and nationally, that brings attention to the struggles of homeless and at-risk youth and adults.

The Outreach & Health Ministry Program was launched in 1989. In 2005, we purchased a 38-foot Health Outreach Bus. In 2007, we launched two new shelter programs for homeless youth, doubling our bed capacity. In 2011, The Crib, our overnight youth shelter, opened in Lakeview. The Health Outreach Bus began expanding its service offerings by one night per week in 2014; and in 2015, we incorporated daytime services by going out during the day. In 2020, our health outreach services were extended to Chicago's public transit system, providing meals, health assessments, and case management at transit stations.

The Night Ministry is always looking for new ways to grow its programs, serve more people and provide comprehensive services, which is evident in our newest strategic plan, “Serving in the Next Decade," The Night Ministry is embarking on projects to expand facilities and services and grow its capacity all while developing a reputation as a thought leader, sustaining a data driven culture of learning and maintaining fiscal health and sustainability.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.06

Average of 4.52 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.9

Average of 2.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26%

Average of 25% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The Night Ministry

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Night Ministry

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Night Ministry

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of The Night Ministry’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $611,354 $591,135 $856,327 $1,710,266 $2,407,907
As % of expenses 7.8% 6.9% 8.9% 16.5% 23.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $517,266 $490,001 $717,471 $1,266,427 $1,994,160
As % of expenses 6.5% 5.6% 7.3% 11.7% 18.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $8,395,301 $11,667,298 $11,360,548 $11,300,139 $11,762,279
Total revenue, % change over prior year -12.2% 39.0% -2.6% -0.5% 4.1%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.6% 2.4% 2.4% 6.3% 1.6%
Government grants 19.2% 15.1% 16.5% 16.7% 32.5%
All other grants and contributions 80.5% 82.5% 81.4% 77.5% 66.0%
Other revenue -0.3% 0.0% -0.4% -0.5% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $7,838,876 $8,598,741 $9,671,601 $10,352,132 $10,460,538
Total expenses, % change over prior year 15.9% 9.7% 12.5% 7.0% 1.0%
Personnel 72.1% 73.9% 70.1% 70.1% 72.8%
Professional fees 3.7% 3.8% 7.5% 3.3% 3.0%
Occupancy 9.1% 8.2% 13.3% 12.5% 9.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.5% 1.0% 0.7%
Pass-through 1.1% 0.2% 0.0% 0.4% 0.9%
All other expenses 14.1% 13.9% 8.6% 12.7% 12.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $7,932,964 $8,699,875 $9,810,457 $10,795,971 $10,874,285
One month of savings $653,240 $716,562 $805,967 $862,678 $871,712
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $329,066 $4,505,470 $512,337 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $8,586,204 $9,745,503 $15,121,894 $12,170,986 $11,745,997

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.6 3.5 4.2 3.4 1.9
Months of cash and investments 6.9 8.8 9.5 10.0 8.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.0 3.1 -1.8 -0.3 2.4
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,675,490 $2,472,875 $3,403,073 $2,929,339 $1,641,054
Investments $2,845,252 $3,815,731 $4,225,956 $5,678,064 $5,753,461
Receivables $857,708 $1,755,086 $1,844,811 $1,277,691 $873,670
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,742,953 $3,071,521 $7,183,198 $7,485,061 $7,414,406
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 92.6% 86.0% 33.2% 35.0% 39.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 9.4% 5.7% 34.2% 31.6% 39.9%
Unrestricted net assets $2,135,013 $2,625,014 $3,342,485 $4,608,912 $6,603,072
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,699,189 $4,176,611 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $1,361,240 $1,361,240 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $3,060,429 $5,537,851 $6,370,471 $5,608,212 $3,894,547
Total net assets $5,195,442 $8,162,865 $9,712,956 $10,217,124 $10,497,619

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and CEO

Ms. Carol J. Sharp

As President & CEO, Carol provides leadership and vision for The Night Ministry, working closely with the Executive Team and Board of Directors to advance the agency’s mission and strategic goals. Before joining The Night Ministry, Carol held influential leadership positions at Youth Guidance, Girls Inc. of Chicago, and Perspectives Charter Schools. Under her leadership, she has played a pivotal role in shaping organizational operations, cultivating donors and partnerships, and championing the design and implementation of comprehensive program strategies that have supported youth in healthy living, academic achievement, and life skills development. Carol holds a Master of Public Administration & Nonprofit Mission-Driven Management from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Arts from American InterContinental University.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The Night Ministry

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

The Night Ministry

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

The Night Ministry

Board of directors
as of 01/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Kiantae Bowles

BMO Financial Group

Term: 2012 -

Mark Warren

Point B Management Consulting

Bennett Applegate

Applegate & Thorne-Thomsen

Gordon Addington

Retired, Walgreens

Dan Alter

JP Morgan Private Bank

Dave Berger

Group One Trading

Lindsay Claytor

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Savannah Boren

JP Morgan Chase

Michael Borromeo

Stericycle, Inc.

The Reverend Shawna Bowman

Friendship Presbyterian Church

Erica Hubbard

The Obama Foundation

Norman Jeddeloh

Retired, Saul, Ewing, Arnstein & Lehr

Laura Mandel

The Northern Trust Company

Don Mizerk

Husch Blackwell

Dana Ringer

Kaizen Health

Kristen Rothenberg

Toyota Financial Savings Bank

Sonesh Shah

Robert Bosch Tool Corporation

Dennis Thorn

Dennis W. Thorn & Associates

Ted Tomaras

JLL

Jarrod Welch

Charles River Associates

Bradley Caldwell

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser