PLATINUM2023

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

We Share Food

Wilkinsburg, PA   |  http://www.wcm15221.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

EIN: 25-1196619


Mission

The Wilkinsburg Community Ministry ensures that all Wilkinsburg residents, young and old, can receive hunger relief services, emergency energy assistance, and proper nutrition and clothing so that every resident's basic needs of food, clothing, and comfort are met.

Ruling year info

1969

Principal Officer

Ruth Kittner PhD

Main address

704 Wood Street

Wilkinsburg, PA 15221 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

25-1196619

Subject area info

Human services

Basic and emergency aid

Youth services

Senior services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

People with diseases and illnesses

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To truly address hunger and nutrition security requires innovative collaboration between private, public, and nonprofit sectors to ensure the availability and awareness of interventions and wrap-around services to support low-income families. Toward this end, with the support of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank (GPCFB), in 2022 we supplemented our store front food pantry with a mobile pantry. We take a 26-foot truck equipped with refrigerator/freezer to different locations in our service area (and one outside it in Sharpsburg) to distribute food to people with transportation challenges. These neighborhoods were specifically chosen and aim to reach people with no transportation. These sites operate in the late afternoon and evening so that working families can get there.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Store Front Food Pantry

Our store front pantry is open Monday through Friday from 9-1. We serve all people who come between those hours. We have a variety of choices of meats, refrigerated items, produce, breads, desserts, canned goods. Wednesday is "sweets" day--a local grocery store gives us their bakery items. Families and individuals may come up to 2x a week. Some paperwork is required at the first visit, and subsequently updated yearly.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Our mobile Food Pantry visits selected locations in the east end of Allegheny County -- Wilkinsburg, East Liberty, East Homewood, Penn Hills, Edgewood-- with a mobile pantry truck to help our neighbors meet their nutrition needs. Our website shows the locations and the times.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In collaboration with the Wilkinsburg School District, WCM provides backpacks to be distributed to children at the onset of the school year. Backpacks contain an assortment of school supplies and are also used for the schools to send food home on weekends. Contact the Wilkinsburg School District

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

On an adjacent vacant lot, WCM provides a small garden, specifically organized for children, in which neighbors can learn about gardening, composting, food, and nutrition. The target is small children, but we encourage all our neighbors to visit the garden and to see how it grows!

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Store Front Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Estimate of number of families served. Some of these are duplicated. Most families have 2 - 5 individuals

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Operation Backpack

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These are the number of backpacks we distributed in these years.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Store Front Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Store Front Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Percentages of local residents accessing food aid

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Store Front Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Estimate based on pounds of food distributed

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Provide healthy food that our neighbors will eat, that is culturally appropriate and nutritious.
Offer our neighbors a choice of the food the take. We do not assume that they will appreciate something just because we like it.
Arrange our hours to that food is available at appropriate times
Provide an open and welcoming environment in which families can chose the food they want. We don't prepack a box and shove it at them

Of our neighbors, 40-50% of whom are seniors, mostly live in housing underwritten with public funds. Many seniors have grandchildren they are feeding. Of adults over the age of 50, 70% have a disability, or a physical/mental health diagnosis. Of all adults we serve, 30% are veterans and 40% have a long-term illness, such as diabetes, hypertension, obstructive airway disease, or heart disease, with kidney disease being the most prominent. Every week, 10-12 of our neighbors asking for help are homeless.

WCM operates from a double store front on Wood Street in Wilkinsburg, serving 40-60 families daily, distributing approximately 500 pounds of fresh food per day, plus canned food, frozen meat, staples, and household items. The location is convenient to four subsidized housing facilities, including the senior housing at Dumplin Hall and Wood Street Towers. It is also on a bus route and one block from the busway, within about four level blocks of both the MLK station and the Hamnet station. Generally, we distribute between 30,000-35,000 pounds of food a month. Much of our food comes from the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. In addition, we have several deliveries from 412 Food Rescue, most of which we distribute here, and some of which we supply to other non-profits who can use it immediately. In the summer months, several local gardens provide us with produce as well. We can distribute enough fresh food year-round to offer our neighbors a diet that includes 40-60 % fresh food.
Our relationships with our food partners, especially 412 Food Rescue and Costco are important factors in our ability to share food. 412 Food Rescue was founded as a direct response to the disparity between food availability and food waste, and their relationship to hunger. 412 Food Rescue brings us several deliveries a week of a wider variety of food than we can often obtain from the food bank. WCM can only take food that is ready for home prep, or that has been individually wrapped at its source. We can take individually packaged food that can be refrigerated, such as salads or sandwich wraps. These often come from the prepared foods aisle at Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s. We also received smaller donations from local bakeries, small local stores, and the East End Food Cooperative. 412 Food Rescue also brings us donations from Five Points Bakery and Panera. We invested in a bread slicer so we can cut the loaves as many of our seniors are reluctant to cut these big loaves. Costco is our other major supplier.

We have a balanced team of staff and volunteers. For every staff hour, a volunteer hour supports the staff work by moving food through our system. Most of the store front pantry staff have been with us since before the pandemic; the mobile pantry staff have been with us for a year. Most of our volunteers have been with us for at least two years, although we typically add one or two a year as needed.
Our limitations are space and finances. We are looking at developing a space that is 2.5 times the size of the space we have, with improved storage and shelving and access for deliveries. The addition of the mobile pantry has nearly doubled our budget from 2022 to 2023. This has required considerable fund raising efforts, both in the corporate and foundation area, with state funding, and with our annual fund. Annual fund tends to cap out at $175,000 a year in the past three years, mainly from individuals and congregations; foundation/corporate fundraising has increased steadily since the pandemic, jumping in 2023 to about $325,000. Part of that is earmarked for capacity building measures.

In January 2022, the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank (GPCFB) approached Wilkinsburg Community Ministry (WCM) with an idea to pilot a mobile pantry. The operating challenge questioned whether it was feasible to piggyback a mobile pantry on to successful and well-run and successful bricks-and-mortar pantry.
Wilkinsburg seemed the ideal site to test this kind of a project. The urban streets are rough, the terrain is hilly, and the population dense. GPCFB has successfully used mobile pantries in such rural areas as Somerset County. Would a mobile pantry/mobile distribution work in an urban area as well? In our first 12 months of operation, September 2022-2023, we have found that we can go to sites, stay for 2-3 hours, and distribute every can, bottle, packet of meat, apple, and pear.

Our store front pantry has evolved as we have encouraged people to chose their own food: what they want to eat as opposed to what we think they should eat. It's a rare day when people are not waiting in line at 9 am when we open our doors;



How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.75

Average of 3.54 over 3 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.7

Average of 1 over 3 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7%

Average of 7% over 3 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Wilkinsburg Community Ministry’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $57,586 $3,702 $44,248
As % of expenses 34.0% 1.8% 16.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $57,586 $3,702 $44,248
As % of expenses 34.0% 1.8% 16.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $227,192 $205,231 $314,991
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% -9.7% 53.5%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.5%
Government grants 8.6% 0.0% 11.7%
All other grants and contributions 91.4% 95.1% 87.7%
Other revenue 0.0% 4.9% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $169,606 $201,529 $270,743
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 18.8% 34.3%
Personnel 47.4% 55.4% 49.7%
Professional fees 1.0% 1.3% 1.3%
Occupancy 9.0% 11.7% 8.1%
Interest 1.3% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 41.4% 31.6% 40.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $169,606 $201,529 $270,743
One month of savings $14,134 $16,794 $22,562
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $183,740 $218,323 $293,305

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.8 0.3 1.7
Months of cash and investments 0.8 0.3 1.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -0.8 -0.5 1.6
Balance sheet composition info 2020 2021 2022
Cash $11,891 $5,371 $39,331
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 191.1% 226.6% 10.0%
Unrestricted net assets -$11,702 -$8,000 $36,248
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total net assets -$11,702 -$8,000 $36,248

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Ruth Kittner PhD

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Wilkinsburg Community Ministry

Board of directors
as of 09/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Beth Simon


Board co-chair

Jane Fox

Tom Ochs

First Presbyterian Church of Edgewood

Larry Viehland

Representing Mifflin Ave United Methodist Church

Pat Hauser

Member at Large

Claudia Viehland

Representing Mifflin Ave UMC

Janet Hellner-Burris

Representing Christian Church of Wilkinsburg

Beth Simon

Representing Waverley Presbyterian Church

Jerry Gaudi

ImPact Redevelopment

Jeff Hoener

Representing South Ave United Methodist church

Darlene Thornton

New Covenant Baptist Church

Joe Bute

Member at Large

Jane Fox

Six Presbyterian Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/7/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/26/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.