PLATINUM2023

Entertainment Community Fund

aka The Actors Fund   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.entertainmentcommunity.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Entertainment Community Fund

EIN: 13-1635251


Mission

Entertainment Community Fund (formerly The Actors Fund) fosters stability and resiliency, and provides a safety net for performing arts and entertainment professionals over their lifespan.

Ruling year info

1940

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Joseph Benincasa

Main address

729 Seventh Ave 10th Floor

New York, NY 10019 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1635251

Subject area info

Arts services

Artists' services

Performing arts

Human services

Population served info

Adults

Seniors

Homeless people

Artists and performers

NTEE code info

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seasonal and episodic work results in underemployment, low wages and a lack of health insurance for performing arts and entertainment professionals. A work related injury or illness can completely derail a career and source of income. An interruption of work because of illness or injury may result in lost wages, rent arrears, credit problems and other financial issues. The Actors Fund's programs and services have been developed to address these needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Career Center

A program providing job counseling, workshops and training to help entertainment professionals obtain meaningful sideline or parallel employment to supplement their careers or support them in transitioning into new professions.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A 124-bed assisted-living and nursing home located in Englewood, New Jersey, for senior/disabled individuals with ties to the entertainment and performing arts community. The Home will be expanded to 169 beds by the end of 2018, with new sub-acute and memory care units.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Artists and performers

The Actors Fund provides affordable, supportive homes for 189 low-income performing arts professionals and others with special needs in midtown Manhattan, and 216 affordable and supportive apartments for low-income performing arts professionals and formerly homeless individuals in Downtown Brooklyn.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Artists and performers

The Actors Fund Social Services offer comprehensive programs designed to meet the unique needs of entertainment professionals. Social workers provide crisis intervention, individual and family needs assessments, and develop long-term plans include ongoing support, education, information and referrals. In addition, financial assistance can be provided for essential living expenses such as rent, utilities or medical costs.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Adults

The Actors Fund provides expert counseling on obtaining affordable health insurance in all 50 states, as well as enrollment services in New York and California. The Friedman Health Center for the Performing Arts provides health services for entertainment professionals in the heart of Times Square.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Artists and performers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Provide human services and emergency financial assistance to performing arts and entertainment professionals across the country who are facing a crisis or need.
2. Respond to increasing demand for services by scaling programs to reach a larger number of industry professionals across the country.
3. Continue to evolve our health services to adapt to the changing health care environment
4. Develop more affordable housing opportunities for artists and arts workers
5. Advance fundraising to meet goals

1. Increase human services and emergency financial assistance
--Hire additional social workers to provide case management and crisis intervention services
Increase fundraising to raise more funds for emergency financial assistance
2. Respond to increasing demand for services by scaling our services and bringing programs to creative communities across the country.
--Increase services in the Central Region
--Develop Programs To Go
--Develop remote workshop and seminar opportunities
3. Evolve our health care services to adapt to the changing health care environment
--Secure funding to help individuals and arts organizations access health insurance under Affordable Care Act
--Stay abreast of changes to the health care landscape and communicate changes to our clients
4. Develop more affordable housing opportunities for artists and arts workers
-- Develop at least 100 new units of affordable artist housing in LA and/or NYC
--Expand training and education services to help arts workers identify and successfully apply for affordable housing opportunities
--Actively work in communities with large arts populations to create new opportunities to support artist housing
5. Advance fundraising
--Increase contributions by 25% by 2021
--Conduct capital campaign feasibility study for expansion of nursing home and assisted living facility
--Identify prospects who may support affordable housing development

1. The Actors Fund already has a strong foundation of human services. Our human services programs are staffed by licensed social workers who provide assessment, advocacy, access to entitlements, financial management and assistance and referrals for entertainment industry professionals.
2. The Actors Fund currently employs a staff of more than 200 in its NYC, LA and Chicago offices. Our program staff of licensed social workers and our administrative staff of talented professionals work towards shared annual goals to meet agency objectives, and are evaluated annually as part of our performance management system.
3. The Actors Fund currently operates the national Artists Health Insurance Resource Center and the New York City-based Friedman Health Center for the Performing Arts. With health care and insurance professionals on our Board and staff, The Actors Fund is well-positioned to adapt its health services to today's changing environment.
4. The Actors Fund currently operates 3 affordable housing residences in New York City, Brooklyn and Los Angeles with a combined 460 affordable units, with plans for a new development in Los Angeles. We have demonstrated experience identifying, securing financing, developing and managing affordable housing residences.
5. The Actors Fund employs a fundraising staff of 18 and has a strong foundation of individual, corporate and foundation donors, robust membership and special event programs, and a well-established planned giving program. We are well positioned for growth in this area.

1. Increase services for seniors: We expanded our Senior Care program in 2015 by adding two additional social workers and we are now providing case management services to elderly and infirm seniors. We also launched a new volunteer and activities program to harness the energies of active seniors to provide assistance to seniors who are housebound, and program a variety of activities to improve the social, mental and physical wellbeing of seniors in New York City's Hell's Kitchen and Chelsea communities.
2. Respond to increasing demand for services by enlisting more staff and expanding programs: We have added 5 new staff members in 2015.
3. Evolve our health care services to adapt to the changing health care environment: We are educating individuals and small arts organizations in New York and California and across the United States about the Affordable Care Act, and we are enrolling individuals in new plans in New York and California. We are about to implement a plan to transition our health clinic to work within the new health care environment.
4. Develop more affordable housing opportunities for artists and arts workers: We have partnered with private and public organizations to develop affordable artist housing in Los Angeles and New York and are working on securing sites.
5. Advance fundraising: We are identifying new opportunities to increase contributions in all areas and actively pursuing them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.93

Average of 0.97 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.1

Average of 4.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

31%

Average of 33% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Entertainment Community Fund

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Entertainment Community Fund

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Entertainment Community Fund

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Entertainment Community Fund’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $5,631,682 -$1,907,173 $24,470,211 $12,110,715 $1,165,030
As % of expenses 15.6% -4.6% 41.2% 25.5% 2.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $3,758,349 -$4,023,870 $22,103,770 $9,712,908 -$1,296,205
As % of expenses 9.9% -9.3% 35.8% 19.5% -2.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $36,036,341 $38,505,624 $87,206,491 $61,544,838 $55,601,567
Total revenue, % change over prior year -2.2% 6.9% 126.5% -29.4% -9.7%
Program services revenue 40.4% 45.0% 21.6% 30.0% 36.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 2.3% 2.1% 0.8% 1.3% 2.8%
Government grants 4.6% 5.2% 2.9% 10.5% 3.1%
All other grants and contributions 52.2% 46.4% 75.4% 56.2% 58.5%
Other revenue 0.5% 1.3% -0.6% 1.9% -0.9%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $36,162,916 $41,090,276 $59,347,967 $47,403,721 $49,780,682
Total expenses, % change over prior year 9.6% 13.6% 44.4% -20.1% 5.0%
Personnel 60.9% 59.3% 42.3% 54.0% 56.5%
Professional fees 7.7% 8.7% 6.0% 8.5% 11.3%
Occupancy 8.6% 8.5% 5.7% 7.2% 7.1%
Interest 0.4% 1.4% 1.0% 1.1% 1.7%
Pass-through 8.2% 7.3% 34.0% 17.1% 10.5%
All other expenses 14.2% 14.8% 11.0% 12.0% 12.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $38,036,249 $43,206,973 $61,714,408 $49,801,528 $52,241,917
One month of savings $3,013,576 $3,424,190 $4,945,664 $3,950,310 $4,148,390
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $1,743,145 $761,295 $0
Fixed asset additions $8,946,034 $3,445,949 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $49,995,859 $50,077,112 $68,403,217 $54,513,133 $56,390,307

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.9 1.3 6.8 8.8 7.1
Months of cash and investments 20.4 17.2 17.9 23.9 20.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 7.7 5.3 8.1 12.6 12.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $8,668,656 $4,476,276 $33,493,151 $34,594,126 $29,292,502
Investments $52,720,041 $54,427,693 $55,176,467 $59,871,864 $54,841,543
Receivables $4,267,281 $3,164,995 $6,973,685 $8,012,814 $25,706,131
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $61,717,844 $64,948,781 $65,579,996 $67,132,446 $67,360,122
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 33.3% 34.6% 37.6% 40.0% 43.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 42.8% 42.5% 37.2% 30.1% 38.3%
Unrestricted net assets $39,615,738 $35,591,868 $57,695,638 $67,408,546 $66,112,341
Temporarily restricted net assets $3,486,628 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $19,836,870 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $23,323,498 $26,271,682 $29,926,541 $36,075,825 $36,437,091
Total net assets $62,939,236 $61,863,550 $87,622,179 $103,484,371 $102,549,432

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Joseph Benincasa

Mr. Benincasa joined The Actors Fund in 1988. He oversees innovative programs including comprehensive social services, health care services, employment and affordable, supportive and senior housing. He serves on the boards of directors of several organizations including Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, the Human Services Council and others. He has been recognized with several honors, including the inaugural Made in New York Award, presented by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and Brooklyn's Italian of the Year. He served as chair of the NY Society of Association Executives in 2007, has lectured on not-for-profit management at Duke University and the New School, and served on the Tony Administration and Nominating Committees, and on the Board of Directors of St. Peter's University Medical Center. In 2011 he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters by Centenary College and served on the New York State Attorney General's Leadership Committee for Nonprofit Revitalization.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Entertainment Community Fund

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Entertainment Community Fund

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Entertainment Community Fund

Board of directors
as of 11/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr Brian Stokes Mitchell

Actor

Term: 1998 -

Philip J Smith

The Shubert Organization

Lee Perlman

Greater New York Hospital Association

Marc Grodman

Bio Reference Laboratories

Abby Schroeder

A Schroeder International

Tom Viola

Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS

Mark Hostetter

Financial Consultant

Annette Bening

Actor

Teresa Eyring

Theatre Communications Group

Andrew Flatt

Disney Theatrical Productions

David Goodman

Writers Guild of America

Heather Hitchens

American Theatre Wing

Sharon Karmazin

Theatrical Producer

Chris Keyser

Writers Guild of America, West

Stewart L Lane

Stewart Lane Productions

Paul Libin

Jujamcyn Theaters

Matthew Loeb

IATSE International

Mary McColl

Actors' Equity

James Nederlander

Nederlander Productions

Ruth Nerken

Jean and Albert Nerken Foundations

Stanley Newman

Philanthropist

David Rambo

Playwright/Screenwriter/Producer

Charlotte St. Martin

The Broadway League

Kate Shindle

Actors Equity Association

Robert Wankel

The Shubert Organization

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/5/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser