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Arkansas Imagination Library


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Arkansas Imagination Library

EIN: 82-1620909


Mission

The mission of Arkansas Imagination Library (ARIL) is to promote early childhood literacy in Arkansas’ birth to age five population, by providing access to free, high-quality, age appropriate books in the home. In partnership with Dolly Parton's Imagination Library, ARIL gives all preschoolers in Arkansas the opportunity to receive books in the mail at no cost to families. Our vision is an Arkansas where all preschool children have books in their homes, develop a love of reading and learning, and begin school prepared to succeed, from kindergarten throughout their educational journeys.

Ruling year info

2018

Executive Director

Dr. Charlotte Green Parham EdD

Main address

401 SCOTT ST Suite 3

LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-1620909

Subject area info

Equal opportunity in education

Child educational development

Out-of-school learning

Student retention

Parent-teacher involvement

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Infants and toddlers

Families

NTEE code info

Unknown (Z99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to the Arkansas Community Foundation's Aspire Report (2019), only 38% of Arkansas third graders are proficient in reading. Third grade is considered an important milestone in a student's career in terms of reading proficiency and is correlated to whether a student will graduate from high school. Research shows that 85% of a child's core brain development occurs before the age of three. This “wiring” shapes infants and toddlers’ ability to learn to read and think critically (J.S. Hutton, 2015). Additional research indicates the dramatic correlation between the number of books in the home and future academic achievement. Children growing up with a home library, even as small as 25 books, got 2.4 more years of education than children from bookless homes (Evans, M.D., 2014). With 26% of Arkansas children living below the federal poverty level, and 53% living under 200% level, Arkansas Imagination Library desires to minimize the impact poverty has on children's access to books.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Arkansas Imagination Library

Arkansas Imagination Library (ARIL) is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works with local affiliates to expand the Imagination Library program. As an official partner of Dolly Parton's Imagination Library, our mission is to increase literacy in Arkansas by ensuring all young children across the state may participate in the program. ARIL believes literacy begins at birth, the benefits of a home library go far beyond the books, and parents/guardians are a child’s first and best teacher. Established in 2017, ARIL has worked with local communities to grow the program from 54 to all 75 counties; increasing the number of children receiving books each month from 16,700 to over 80,000 today (or 43% of the total 0 to 5 population) and growing.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of books distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Arkansas Imagination Library

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Arkansas Imagination Library affiliates have mailed 4.6 million books (and counting) to children in Arkansas since 2005.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children, Parents

Related Program

Arkansas Imagination Library

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total, unduplicated number of children that were enrolled in the Imagination Library program and received monthly books in that year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

ARIL has four goals to ensure an effective implementation plan for delivery:

Goal 1: Provide support to ensure healthy affiliates in all 75 counties.
Since the establishment of the state office in August 2017, ARIL has worked with local affiliates and Arkansas communities to grow the number of counties served. ARIL met our goal of coverage in all 75 counties in 2020. Now ARIL is focusing on strengthening affiliate infrastructure, growing enrollment and fundraising capacity, and engaging communities through current partners and potential new partnerships.

Goal 2: Serve 60% or more of the total 0 - 5 population in Arkansas.
Since 2017, the number of children receiving books has increased from 16,700 to over 80,000. ARIL continues to work with all Arkansas counties to grow the number of enrolled children to 122,553 - 65% of the children in the state of Arkansas. After reaching the 65% goal, ARIL will continue to grow the number of children receiving books in the state. ARIL desires for ALL children ages 0-5 to receive books.

Goal 3: Provide 50% matching dollars to support affiliates.
ARIL works with DPIL and the local county affiliates to provide support for the success of the programs in Arkansas. In partnership with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, ARIL has funding from a federal grant that covers 50% of the cost of books for every affiliate, leaving local affiliates to fund the remaining 50% of expenses. Grant funds ensure that ARIL can help Arkansas affiliates continue intentional enrollment growth by reducing the financial burden at the local level.

Goal 4: Provide research to show the Imagination Library’s impact on the culture of reading and grade-level reading to gain sustainable funding.

As of August 2021, ARIL has provided research to show the impact of the Imagination Library on the culture of reading and grade-level reading. As stated above, the initial 2021 study demonstrated that enrollment in the Imagination Library increases retention, kindergarten readiness, and third grade literacy test scores. ARIL will continue to provide research showing the ongoing impact of the Imagination Library on children's literacy by conducting an annual analysis of new data. By December 2023, ARIL expects to publish the research findings in several prominent national journals. The research is currently being shared with Arkansas legislatures and other leaders across the state.

GOALS AND STRATEGIES

ARIL has four goals to ensure an effective implementation plan for delivery:

Goal 1: Provide support to ensure healthy affiliates in all 75 counties.
Since the establishment of the state office in August 2017, ARIL has worked with local affiliates and Arkansas communities to grow the number of counties served. ARIL met our goal of coverage in all 75 counties in 2020. Now ARIL is focusing on strengthening affiliate infrastructure, growing enrollment and fundraising capacity, and engaging communities through current partners and potential new partnerships.

Goal 2: Serve 60% or more of the total 0 - 5 population in Arkansas.
Since 2017, the number of children receiving books has increased from 16,700 to over 80,000. ARIL continues to work with all Arkansas counties to grow the number of enrolled children to 122,553 - 65% of the children in the state of Arkansas. After reaching the 65% goal, ARIL will continue to grow the number of children receiving books in the state. ARIL desires for ALL children ages 0-5 to receive books.

Goal 3: Provide 50% matching dollars to support affiliates.
ARIL works with DPIL and the local county affiliates to provide support for the success of the programs in Arkansas. In partnership with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, ARIL has funding from a federal grant that covers 50% of the cost of books for every affiliate, leaving local affiliates to fund the remaining 50% of expenses. Grant funds ensure that ARIL can help Arkansas affiliates continue intentional enrollment growth by reducing the financial burden at the local level.

Goal 4: Provide research to show the Imagination Library’s impact on the culture of reading and grade-level reading to gain sustainable funding.

As of August 2021, ARIL has provided research to show the impact of the Imagination Library on the culture of reading and grade-level reading. As stated above, the initial 2021 study demonstrated that enrollment in the Imagination Library increases retention, kindergarten readiness, and third grade literacy test scores. ARIL will continue to provide research showing the ongoing impact of the Imagination Library on children's literacy by conducting an annual analysis of new data. By December 2023, ARIL expects to publish the research findings in several prominent national journals. The research is currently being shared with Arkansas legislatures and other leaders across the state.

In 1995, Dolly Parton launched Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library (DPIL) to benefit the children of her home county in East Tennessee. Dolly’s vision was to foster a love of reading among her county’s preschool children by providing them with the gift of a specially selected book each month. To date, DPIL mails free, high-quality, age-appropriate books to over 2.3 million children each month directly to their home from birth to age five in participating communities within the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and the Republic of Ireland. Dolly's homegrown effort is now a part of thousands of communities' early childhood strategies and is increasingly a vital part of educational policy for states, provinces, and territories.

In 2002, local communities throughout Arkansas started county affiliates to deliver books in the natural state. In July 2017, Governor Asa Hutchinson provided a one-time gift to create the Arkansas Imagination Library (ARIL), a statewide 501c3 nonprofit organization that works with local affiliates to expand the program. As a licensed partner of DPIL, our mission is to increase literacy in Arkansas by ensuring all young children across the state may participate in the Imagination Library. ARIL believes reading begins at birth, the benefits of a home library go far beyond the books, and parents/guardians are a child’s first and best teacher. Since 2017, ARIL has worked with local communities to grow the program from 54 to all 75 counties; increasing the number of children receiving books each month from 16,700 to over 80,000 today (or 43% of the total 0 to 5 population).

By providing books at no cost to families, the Imagination Library increases childhood literacy rates, fosters a love of books, and promotes a culture of reading among underserved families in high-risk communities of Arkansas.

1. Since 2017, Arkansas Imagination Library (ARIL) has work with local communities to grow the program from 54 to all 75 counties in Arkansas; increasing the number of children receiving books each month from 16,700 to over 80,000 to (or 43% of the total 0-5 population.)
2. Included in the total enrollment numbers, ARIL has grown from 7,318 newborns enrolled (age 0 to 1 - born in 2021/22) to 9,974 newborns enrolled (age 0 to 1 - born 2022/23).
3. From January 1, 2022 to December 31, 2022, ARIL served 97,090 total children across the state of Arkansas. ARIL predicts we will serve a total of 125,000 unduplicated children in 2023, of which 20,000 will be age 0 to 1.
4. Preliminary findings from our first data analysis conducted by an outside team shows that enrollment in the Imagination Library decreases retention, and increased kindergarten readiness and third grade literacy test scores. (Walker, J.T.; Parham, C. R.; Holland, G. (2021) Arkansas Research Center, University of Central Arkansas.)
5. Arkansas Imagination Library affiliates have mailed 4.04 million books (and counting) to children in Arkansas since 2005.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Arkansas Imagination Library
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26.89

Average of 52.31 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

74.9

Average of 97.8 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 5% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Arkansas Imagination Library

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Arkansas Imagination Library

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Arkansas Imagination Library

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Arkansas Imagination Library’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $143,265 $241,920 $396,291 $426,118 -$40,377
As % of expenses 118.3% 137.0% 156.7% 172.0% -12.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $143,265 $241,920 $396,291 $426,118 -$40,377
As % of expenses 118.3% 137.0% 156.7% 172.0% -12.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $304,518 $418,505 $649,109 $673,918 $276,841
Total revenue, % change over prior year -61.0% 37.4% 55.1% 3.8% -58.9%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 29.8% 4.4% 5.5% 15.0%
Government grants 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 0.0% 70.2% 81.9% 75.0% 163.3%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 13.6% 19.5% -78.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $121,142 $176,585 $252,818 $247,800 $317,218
Total expenses, % change over prior year 149.8% 45.8% 43.2% -2.0% 28.0%
Personnel 40.1% 32.6% 30.4% 31.8% 25.6%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 1.2% 33.9% 28.4%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 59.9% 67.4% 68.5% 34.4% 46.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $121,142 $176,585 $252,818 $247,800 $317,218
One month of savings $10,095 $14,715 $21,068 $20,650 $26,435
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $13,800 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $131,237 $191,300 $273,886 $282,250 $343,653

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 87.3 76.3 72.9 94.0 74.9
Months of cash and investments 87.3 76.3 72.9 94.0 74.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 86.3 75.6 72.1 94.2 72.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $881,576 $1,123,496 $1,535,971 $1,940,442 $1,979,065
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.2% 0.9% 1.1% 0.0% 3.7%
Unrestricted net assets $871,159 $1,113,079 $1,519,718 $1,945,836 $1,905,459
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $871,159 $1,113,079 $1,519,718 $1,945,836 $1,905,459

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Dr. Charlotte Green Parham EdD

Charlotte Green Parham is the thirteenth of 16 children from Cleveland, Arkansas. She received her BSE in Elementary and Special Education. She continued her learning with an MSE in Gifted Curriculum and completed her education with an Ed.D. in Education Leadership. An educator for more than 20 years, Dr. Parham served as an elementary teacher, gifted specialist, principal, and district administrator in the K-12 school system. She is a national consultant and author who currently serves as an assistant professor in the College of Education at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA). Her research focuses on preschool programs and their impact on K-12 student achievement. Dr. Parham is Executive Director of Arkansas Imagination Library, a partnership with Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, and the founder of Arkansas Preschool Plus. Both are nonprofit organizations that support school readiness.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Arkansas Imagination Library

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Arkansas Imagination Library

Board of directors
as of 04/26/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Jerry Adams

Arkansas Research Alliance

Term: 2018 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mr. Fred Leonard

State Farm Leonard Agency

Term: 2019 - 2024

Houston Davis

University of Central Arkansas

Linda Eilers

University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Jackie Govan

Arkansas Head Start

Fred Leonard

State Farm

Clarke Tucker

Poynter Tucker Law Firm

Richard Valentine

Valentine Consulting

Jerry Adams

Arkansas Research Alliance

Lavon Morton

ArcBest

Eddie Lee Herndon

OGE Energy Corp.

Lisenne Rockefeller

Winrock Group

Bobby Hart

Searcy School District

Clarke Tucker

State Senator

Mireya Reith

Arkansas United

Courtney Pledger

Arkansas PBS AETN

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/01/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.