PLATINUM2023

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Everyone, Everywhere, Equal Value

aka USCRI; Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program; International Institute of Erie   |   Arlington, VA   |  http://www.refugees.org
GuideStar Charity Check

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

EIN: 13-1878704


Mission

The U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants' (USCRI's) mission is to protect the rights and address the needs of persons in forced or voluntary migration worldwide and support their transition to a dignified life.

Ruling year info

1959

President and Chief Executive Officer

Eskinder Negash

Main address

2231 Crystal Drive Suite 350

Arlington, VA 22202 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Immigration and Refugee Services of America

American Council for Nationalities Service

EIN

13-1878704

Subject area info

Human rights

International relations

Right to free movement and asylum

Population served info

Ethnic and racial groups

Immigrants and migrants

Low-income people

NTEE code info

International Migration, Refugee Issues (Q71)

International Human Rights (Q70)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (Q05)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We aim to protect the rights and address the needs of persons in forced or voluntary migration worldwide by advancing fair and humane public policy, facilitating and providing direct professional services, and promoting the full participation of migrants in community life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Refugee Services Division

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees with a network of partner agencies across the country.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Legal services for immigrants.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Comprehensive services to newly arrived refugees.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Established in 1916, the International Services Center has served refugees and immigrants for 100 years. This year the agency joined USCRI as a field office to continue our important work. The International Services Center is now known as USCRI-Cleveland.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

InterAction - Member 2011

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of media citations of advocate research or products

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Refugee Services Division

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of refugees and Special Immigrant Visa recipients resettled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Refugee Services Division

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of unaccompanied immigrant children who received social and legal services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Refugee Services Division

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Unaccompanied immigrant children receiving services from PRS.

Number of human trafficking survivors and family members whose lives were restored and rebuilt

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Immigrant Services Division

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Human trafficking survivors and family members lives restored and rebuilt.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To create communities of opportunity and demand a global standard of dignity for the uprooted.

We work through an experienced network of independent 501(c)(3) partner agencies and USCRI field offices across the country. USCRI works to advocate, protect, and support refugees, migrant children, and victims of trafficking so that these vulnerable people can achieve long-term independence.

Our Refugee Services Division works with those who have fled their homes due to violence, war, and persecution. The USCRI network has many refugee programs, but two—the Reception and Placement and Matching Grant Programs—constitute our core focus. The Reception and Placement Program helps meet the immediate needs of newly arrived refugee families. These needs include finding housing, enrolling children in school, and achieving competency in English. Through the Matching Grant Program, USCRI places 85% of our beneficiaries in jobs and helps them develop the skills required to provide for themselves and their families.

Our Immigrant Services Division protects migrant children who arrive in the U.S. without parents or resources. Many of these children—fleeing domestic abuse, gang violence, and poverty— get deported back to dangerous conditions without ever speaking to an attorney. USCRI places these children with pro bono attorneys and ensures that they are living in safe homes. The need for this program is growing as more children enter the U.S. every day. USCRI is working with government officials in the U.S., Mexico, and Central America to design long-term solutions and to ensure support systems are available for children who return to their countries of origin.

Through our National Human Trafficking Victims Assistance Program, USCRI staff also advocates for victims of forced labor and sex trafficking while providing critical survival services. These services include housing assistance, employment assistance, English language training, health care, and mental health services. The program operates at 144 locations.

With over 100 years of work in the field, we succeed in developing programs that rest on time-tested and empirically robust strategies. Over the years, we have also fine-tuned our management approach. USCRI is able to implement policies that minimize bureaucracy and maximize initiative while insuring proper financial controls and holding ourselves accountable to performance standards.

USCRI's network implements programs through ten field offices and 25 partner agencies. These offices and agencies share challenges, exchange best practices, and collaborate on projects. We are effective and efficient; we believe it is our duty not to waste resources that could help refugees and immigrants.

Thanks to our experienced and highly trained staff members—many of whom are refugees or immigrants themselves—we are able to create and implement linguistically and culturally appropriate programs that welcome newcomers into their American communities.

We have accomplished the following:

Since 1911, we have protected the rights and addressed the needs of hundreds of thousands of refugees and immigrants. During this time, we have demonstrated extensive expertise on issues pertaining to these uprooted groups. In 1922, we began publishing “Interpreter Releases," the definitive, weekly Immigration Law review. In 1948, we published “How to Become a Citizen of the United States," the first pamphlet of its kind.

We have also exhibited thought leadership as one of the earliest and most vocal organizations advocating for refugee rights within the international arena. We led campaigns to promote the rights of refugees of WWII, Congolese in 1962, Vietnamese in 1975, the “Lost Boys" of Sudan in 1990, and Kosovar Albanians in 1992. We also began the campaign to end warehousing of refugees in 2004. This campaign influenced the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees to propose alternatives to warehousing in 2014. In 2005, we established the first program to assist unaccompanied immigrant children. In 2011, we successfully advocated for Syrians to be granted Temporary Protected Status in the U.S., guarding them from being forced back to their war-ensnared homes.

Since our refugee resettlement program was established in its current form in 1975, we have helped over 300,000 refugees and around 2,350 human trafficking survivors to restore and rebuild their lives. Additionally, we have matched over 1,570 unaccompanied children with pro bono attorneys and enabled about 6,560 unaccompanied children to access social services.

We have yet to accomplish following:

USCRI aims to expand services in Central America for unaccompanied minors and victims of human trafficking. USCRI's goal is to facilitate a client-centered service model for children who are forcibly returned to their home countries. We have provided legal trainings and influenced policy makers in the U.S., Mexico, and Central America. We have also provided legal and social services to these children. However, USCRI does not currently have the capacity to ensure that all of these children (totaling over 128,200 new arrivals since October 2013 according to the Office of Refugee Resettlement) receive the proper services that they deserve.

Additionally, USCRI is working to establish programs in Ethiopia to provide out-of-camp opportunities to Eritrean refugee youth. Eritrean youth have practically no viable options for safety in their home country due to political upheaval and rampant human rights violations. According to UNHCR reports, an estimated 300 - 400 Eritrean children arrive to refugee camps in Ethiopia per month, while approximately 200 children depart, presumably to make the perilous journey through North Africa and into Europe. USCRI's East Africa programs would give refugee youth a chance at life through innovative, out-of-camp, direct assistance that leads to microbusinesses and leverages the private sector.

Financials

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.03

Average of 1.30 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.1

Average of 1.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

24%

Average of 28% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,501,794 $1,059,376 $1,991,705 $2,536,243 $1,965,445
As % of expenses 4.6% 1.5% 2.8% 2.1% 0.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $2,392,952 $884,724 $1,827,217 $2,406,002 $1,812,526
As % of expenses 4.4% 1.3% 2.6% 2.0% 0.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $56,761,867 $70,171,322 $73,151,996 $124,758,624 $280,249,353
Total revenue, % change over prior year -27.6% 23.6% 4.2% 70.5% 124.6%
Program services revenue 7.1% 4.1% 4.1% 2.3% 0.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0%
Government grants 88.9% 93.3% 92.6% 94.1% 94.3%
All other grants and contributions 3.6% 1.7% 3.0% 3.5% 4.6%
Other revenue 0.2% 0.7% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $54,419,940 $68,707,350 $71,466,670 $122,139,229 $272,294,472
Total expenses, % change over prior year -30.0% 26.3% 4.0% 70.9% 122.9%
Personnel 24.5% 24.9% 31.2% 20.4% 14.0%
Professional fees 3.9% 1.1% 0.9% 0.7% 0.9%
Occupancy 1.6% 3.5% 4.0% 2.4% 1.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 65.3% 64.4% 59.7% 73.8% 82.5%
All other expenses 4.7% 6.1% 4.2% 2.7% 1.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $54,528,782 $68,882,002 $71,631,158 $122,269,470 $272,447,391
One month of savings $4,534,995 $5,725,613 $5,955,556 $10,178,269 $22,691,206
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $364,795 $0
Fixed asset additions $357,159 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $59,420,936 $74,607,615 $77,586,714 $132,812,534 $295,138,597

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.2 2.0 2.5 1.8 1.1
Months of cash and investments 2.3 3.0 3.5 2.4 1.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.4 2.1 2.4 1.6 0.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $5,629,034 $11,363,215 $14,781,375 $18,685,784 $24,069,426
Investments $4,854,432 $5,870,501 $6,161,451 $6,221,713 $5,161,214
Receivables $6,088,722 $8,525,204 $7,148,711 $47,656,067 $23,590,657
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,466,332 $2,470,879 $2,472,215 $2,538,905 $2,521,308
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 53.3% 60.3% 66.9% 70.3% 75.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 31.7% 51.2% 48.8% 75.8% 55.1%
Unrestricted net assets $12,211,938 $13,096,662 $14,923,879 $17,329,881 $19,142,407
Temporarily restricted net assets $62,149 $155,702 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $62,149 $155,702 $28,732 $539,574 $5,186,506
Total net assets $12,274,087 $13,252,364 $14,952,611 $17,869,455 $24,328,913

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and Chief Executive Officer

Eskinder Negash

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/15/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Katharine Crost

No Affiliation


Board co-chair

Katharine Laud

Former Associate Vice President for Finance and Administration at the University of Vermont Foundation

Sam Udani

Publisher, ILW.COM

Scott Wu

Blue Horizon Equity

Gene DeFelice

Retired

Katharine Crost

Senior Counsel, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, LLP

John Monahan

Georgetown University

Diann Dawson

President and CEO, DDA & Associates

Earl Johnson

Former, Director of the Office of Family Assistance

Jeffrey Metzger

Retired

Helen R. Kanovsky

General Counsel of Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA)

Kevin Bearden

Vice President and General Manager, Software Solutions Sector at SQS International

Jeffrey Kelley

Served as a Director of Public Affairs for the Administration for Children and Families

Regis G. McDonald

Retired

Loc Nguyen

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.