PLATINUM2024

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Ending Homelessness One Life at a Time

Tustin, CA   |  https://www.rescuemission.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

EIN: 95-2479552


Mission

The purpose of Orange County Rescue Mission is to minister the love of Jesus Christ to the Least, the Last and the Lost of our community through the provision of assistance in the areas of guidance, counseling, education, job training, shelter, food, clothing, health care and independent living communities.

Programs are available to individuals of any faith, gender or race.

Ruling year info

1972

President

Mr. Bryan Crain

Main address

1 Hope Drive

Tustin, CA 92782 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-2479552

Subject area info

Homeless shelters

Special population support

Homeless services

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

Substance abusers

Veterans

Homeless people

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Orange County Rescue Mission continues to meet the needs of homeless individuals and families in the community by providing practical and effective solutions to homelessness through its comprehensive programs and services. By offering a hand up and not just a handout, we are transitioning formerly homeless individuals and families to life of financial independence and self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach and Prevention

Homeless Outreach and Prevention Services for all homeless and impoverished individuals and families include:



Information and Referral Services to individuals seeking assistance through any of the Orange County Rescue Mission's community outreach programs or to the Rescue Mission's internal programs, such as our transitional housing programs. 
Mobile Feeding Program for the chronically homeless provides approximately 500 hot meals weekly to the homeless in various locations throughout the county.
Monthly Food Box Distribution Program distributes 400 food boxes monthly to partner agencies for distribution to low-income residents in their communities. Through a partnership with Second Harvest and Starbucks, the Rescue Mission distributes fresh food items to partner agencies weekly. 
 Veterans Outreach Program offers hygiene kits, food items, referrals to community services available to veterans, assistance in accessing VA benefits, and ongoing communication and support.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Village of Hope, a 262-bed transitional housing program, is designed to help homeless individuals and families reenter the community, restore family relationships, and find permanent gainful employment. The Village of Hope offers basic necessities, such as safe housing and daily meals, as well as integrated support services that empower homeless individuals and families towards financial self-sufficiency.
Services include: case management, personal and workforce development, high school diploma or equivalency attainment, basic life skills training, parent coaching, and financial education. Residents learn valuable work skills, such as proper work attire, professionalism and interpersonal communication, through volunteer work assignments in finance, janitorial, maintenance, landscaping, food services, and administration.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

The Double R Ranch (DRR) is a 142-acre working horse ranch for single homeless men who have been abused or are overcoming addiction. The Double R Ranch offers shelter, comprehensive support services and the unique opportunity to work outdoors with animals for homeless men learning how to live a sober and self-sufficient life.
 
One of the most difficult parts of being homeless is the isolation, loneliness and lack of social support. The Double R Ranch is designed to create a safe and supportive community, allowing homeless men to gain the skills and tools needed to regain full-time employment, and maintain a life of sobriety. Services include safe shelter, daily meals, case management and counseling, as well as personal and professional development opportunities.
 
Throughout the program, the men learn valuable work skills and gain practical leadership tools through volunteer work assignments in animal care and husbandry, carpentry, mechanics, and maintenance. Through personal commitment, accountability and a structured routine, homeless men learn the skills needed to thrive long after the program.
 
Every day, the residents gather together for their meals, and participate in group classes led by Thom, the Double R Ranch Manager, who is a certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor. Classes include life skills training, anger management, and process groups where the residents can openly share their struggles and concerns in a safe environment.
 
Working with animals under guidance from Denise, the Horse Master, helps the residents build new skills and purpose in a safe, non-judgmental space. As the men develop a bond with the animals, it allows them to gain the animal's trust and unconditional love. The combination of hard work and the soothing nature of the animals empowers the men to gain self-confidence and self-worth as well as rebuild trust, heal from trauma, and learn how to care for others.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers

In
2016, the Orange County Rescue Mission opened the Tustin Veterans Outpost to
address the challenges faced by homeless veterans, specifically: lack of
housing, unemployment or underemployment, and poor linkage to community
services. The Tustin Veterans Outpost is a 26-bed transitional housing program
that provides shelter and comprehensive support services for homeless veterans
and their families who are unemployed, underemployed, or full-time college
students.In addition to receiving basic necessities, such as shelter and daily meals, the Outpost provides comprehensive support services to help homeless veterans and their spouses gain the skills they need to find and maintain full-time employment. Vocational and job training services are offered at the nearby Village of Hope, where the veterans have access to high school diploma or equivalency attainment, life skills and vocational training, job readiness workshops, and financial literacy and credit repair classes. The veterans and their spouses who complete the program have access to better job and educational opportunities, and better wages.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Veterans

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

OC Partnership 2008

Citygate Network 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Homeless people, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Homeless people, Substance abusers, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans, Substance abusers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of legal assistance offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Substance abusers, Pregnant people, Homeless people

Related Program

Village of Hope

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID-19, legal assistance sessions decreased compared to years past.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Non-adult children, Single parents, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Non-adult children, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Pregnant people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of low-income families housed in affordable, well-maintained units as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Parents, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of those who successfully gained employment after counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Veterans, Substance abusers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Homelessness is more than simply a need for housing – at the heart, it is an issue of brokenness. These homeless individuals and families have been broken down by drug and alcohol addictions, domestic violence, destructive relationships, death of loved ones, abuse, neglect, abandonment, and poor life choices. Through the unhealthy choices they made to cope with the circumstances of their lives, their self-value has been diminished. Orange County Rescue Mission provides programs that are holistic and comprehensive, integrating practical strategies that lead to self-sufficiency and financial independence.

The programs of Orange County Rescue Mission extend well beyond providing stable housing and a healthy living environment for homeless men, women, children, veterans, and survivors of human trafficking. In addition to providing the basic necessities of safe housing, food and clothing, we are providing case management, access to mental healthcare, education, parenting classes, life skills training, vocational training, workforce development, career placement, recovery support and more.

Since 1965, Orange County Rescue Mission has been a leading front runner in providing practical and effective solutions to ending homelessness, one life at a time. As the needs of the homeless grew and evolved within the community, the Rescue Mission grew and evolved its programs and services to meet those needs where no one else was. Under President Jim Palmers 28 year visionary leadership, the Rescue Mission grew from one site to now 14 campuses throughout Southern California. This has all been accomplished with zero government funding, but through 100% private funding and operating debt-free. Under Bryan Crain's leadership, Orange County Rescue Mission anticipates increasing its impact among the homeless community with the September 2023 opening and program expansion of its newly relocated Double R Ranch.

In 2023, Orange County Rescue Mission launched the relocated Double R Ranch in Orange County. The relocation and expansion of the Double R Ranch increases the Rescue Mission's occupancy by over 100 beds. The new location will include services unique to the ranch setting and allow women and children to benefit from the services and programs at the Ranch.

In response to the increase in homelessness in Orange County, Orange County Rescue Mission expanded its flagship transitional housing program in Tustin by adding 70 beds for homeless single men and homeless single mothers with children. Village of Hope is now a 250-bed transitional housing program for homeless men, women, and children.

Recognizing the lack of emergency shelter services for women escaping human trafficking, an alarmingly fast-growing industry in Orange County, the Rescue Mission launched Strong Beginnings. With a trauma-informed, victim-focused approach, Strong Beginnings is the emergency shelter program in Orange County to support survivors of human trafficking. In addition to emergency shelter, services include case management to establish an individualized treatment plan, meals, clothing, healthcare, addiction treatment, dental care, trauma-informed therapy, support groups, care coordination, advocacy services, and legal assistance. One of the most important services include helping survivors recover any personal documentation that may have been lost or taken away from them by their pimps as a way to control them. Without this documentation, these women are unable to apply for Medi-Cal, get a job, or rent an apartment. After 90 days in Strong Beginnings, the women are highly encouraged to transition into the Village of Hopes 18-24 month transitional housing program to access basic life skills training, a high school diploma program, vocational training and career placement.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.23

Average of 8.05 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.5

Average of 4.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

31%

Average of 33% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $1,371,872 $321,434 $7,091,986 $16,089,765 $5,782,274
As % of expenses 8.0% 1.8% 37.9% 88.3% 34.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $91,885 -$1,001,949 $5,668,822 $14,606,063 $4,117,523
As % of expenses 0.5% -5.3% 28.2% 74.1% 22.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $18,755,320 $18,318,965 $25,491,001 $34,318,569 $22,626,490
Total revenue, % change over prior year 9.7% -2.3% 39.2% 34.6% -34.1%
Program services revenue 1.4% 0.8% 0.8% 0.4% 1.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.5%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.5% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 97.7% 97.4% 96.7% 96.5% 98.1%
Other revenue 0.9% 1.6% 2.2% 0.5% 0.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $17,236,267 $17,639,812 $18,711,391 $18,228,804 $16,844,219
Total expenses, % change over prior year 13.3% 2.3% 6.1% -2.6% -7.6%
Personnel 22.5% 23.4% 26.5% 29.7% 35.7%
Professional fees 5.7% 3.8% 6.6% 5.4% 5.6%
Occupancy 6.6% 6.8% 7.0% 5.1% 5.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 48.0% 47.1% 47.5% 47.2% 37.3%
All other expenses 17.2% 18.9% 12.3% 12.7% 15.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $18,516,254 $18,963,195 $20,134,555 $19,712,506 $18,508,970
One month of savings $1,436,356 $1,469,984 $1,559,283 $1,519,067 $1,403,685
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $5,128,447 $19,723,235 $2,410,363
Total full costs (estimated) $19,952,610 $20,433,179 $26,822,285 $40,954,808 $22,323,018

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.5 4.9 6.1 3.4 5.5
Months of cash and investments 5.5 4.9 6.1 3.4 5.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.2 4.6 5.6 3.1 5.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $7,899,834 $7,261,851 $9,475,928 $5,150,822 $7,768,441
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $59,507 $157,942 $785,994 $810,881 $1,267,081
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $53,754,195 $54,641,766 $59,813,382 $79,502,212 $81,912,575
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 24.2% 25.9% 26.2% 21.5% 22.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.8% 1.6% 3.4% 1.7% 1.3%
Unrestricted net assets $48,182,145 $47,180,196 $52,849,018 $67,142,705 $71,260,228
Temporarily restricted net assets $147,181 $312,376 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $147,181 $312,376 $0 $312,376 $312,376
Total net assets $48,329,326 $47,492,572 $52,849,018 $67,455,081 $71,572,604

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Mr. Bryan Crain

Bryans passion for serving homeless people began when he started volunteering with a small ministry that served a hot chili dinner, once per week, to the homeless community in downtown Santa Ana. Over time, that ministry grew into the Orange County Rescue Missions Chili Van, which now serves hundreds of people each month in multiple locations. In 2015, Bryan was hired as the Chief Operating Officer, managing operations and student residential programs at all Orange County Rescue Mission sites and properties. His operational oversight includes financial analysis, business planning, risk mitigation strategies, and technology solutions. After eight years of successfully serving as a COO, Bryan accepted the Board of Directors' offer to become the Rescue Mission's President in 2023.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Orange County Rescue Mission, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Bart Hansen

Ransomed Heart Ministries

Chris Ferebee

Self-employed, attorney

William Guard

Dentist

Mark Conzelman

Developer

Steve Callahan

Emergency Room Director, Hoag Memorial Presbyterian

Bart Hansen

Ransomed Heart Ministries

Joe Oltmans

Oltmans Construction Company

Jackie Nowlin

Community Volunteer

Bryan Crain

Pres., Orange County Rescue Mission

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/23/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser