PLATINUM2024

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Empowered Communities with Sustainable Transportation

aka BICAS   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.bicas.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

EIN: 74-2580768


Mission

Through advocacy and bicycle salvage, our mission is to participate in affordable bicycle transportation, education, and creative recycling with our greater Tucson community.

Ruling year info

1990

Principal Officer

The BICAS Collective NA

Main address

2001 N. 7th Ave.

Tucson, AZ 85705 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2580768

Subject area info

Arts exchange

Arts education

Community improvement

Community recreation

Youth services

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Recycling (C27)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Access to affordable and sustainable transportation

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Tools

Community Tools offers participants the opportunity to obtain repair on their bicycle while learning how to perform bicycle maintenance. Anyone from the community is eligible to visit BICAS during our operating hours to utilize this service. Community tools participants will be assigned a trained and experienced bicycle mechanic to work with while troubleshooting any issues, performing bicycle maintenance and maintenance tasks and testing their bicycle safety. In order to make this repair and education accessible, BICAS offers this program at a sliding scale costs of $8 to $16 per hour. The cap of this rate is equivalent to the work-trade hourly rate so participants are able to obtain this knowledge and repair without paying for it. BICAS believes that by offering these services, we can eliminate barriers faced by many people in the community including houseless populations and low-income populations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

BICAS Education programs and classes allow participants to develop their knowledge of bicycle maintenance, mechanics, safety and repair. BICAS offers classes such as Basic Bicycle Maintenance, Modern MTB Technology & Maintenance, Brake Clinic, Gear Clinic, Build-a-Bike and Wheel building. These courses not only connect and support the Tucson community with bicycle knowledge, but they assist individuals with achieving sustainable transportation for an improved and stable future. In order for us to be successful in offering reliable, affordable and sustainable transportation to the public, it is important for us to equip individuals with the skills needed to make adjustments and repairs for their bicycles. Sharing this knowledge-base allows individuals to gain more independence, self-reliance and expand opportunities that transportation provides.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people


The BICAS Art program expands access to the arts using scraps that would have otherwise been added to our landfills. By saving these items we can expand arts access, while preserving resources. BICAS offers workshops and community drop-ins open to all. BICAS recognizes the need in the community for free art programming and offers Art Corner, A weekly art drop in every Friday evening from 4pm to 6pm. Artists coming to BICAS can learn sculpture-making, metalworks, jewelry making as well as painting and functional art. BICAS also hosts quarterly art workshops for any age and skill level. These workshops train individuals how to reimagine scraps and turn them into art or functional items. BICAS staff teach individuals how to repurpose scraps using a variety of techniques by taking them through the process together. To showcase the art created, BICAS offers our Art Gallery to the public. Through this method, the public can see examples of scraps being repurposed into art.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The BICAS Women, Trans, Femme program exists to create a space for women, transgender and feminine presenting people in bicycle mechanics, allowing them the same opportunties as their male counterparts. This program operates as special community where women, transgender folks and feminine presenting people can engage with bicycle mechanics in an inclusive and supportive environment. The WTF program includes group rides, bicycle workshops, exclusive WTF classes, movie nights, a zine library and special hours dedicated to WTF aligned individuals.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Transgender people

BICAS offers our work-trade program to the public 42 hours per week in order to ensure open access to transportation. Through this program, anyone can visit BICAS and earn $16 per hour in credit by completing tasks in our shop. These tasks include sorting bicycles and bicycle parts, completing cleaning and organizing tasks, assisting with accepting in-kind donations, and preparing items for recycling. Due to our low-cost bicycles, parts, tools, education and repair, participants are able to access bicycle transportation without experiencing the burden of high costs. BICAS` work-trade program is available weekly; Tuesday through Sunday 11am to 6pm.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Men and boys
Adolescents
Homeless people
Transgender people

Our Youth Earn-a-Bike Program is a multi-session bicycle repair course which allows youth (ages 8-18) develop tangible mechanical skills, self-confidence and leadership, practice group decision making, environmental stewardship, and community participation as they earn a refurbished bicycle to take home. In addition to providing a bicycle, helmet, and lock, the Youth Earn-a-Bike program is designed to empower youth to engage with their community, experience and appreciate the outdoors, promote reuse and recycling by refurbishing donated bicycles, and foster more bicycle advocates in Tucson.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Community Tools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is a primary unit of service for BICAS. These are users of the sliding fee DIY bicycle repair shop with the assistance of our mechanical trainer.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Incarcerated people

Related Program

Community Tools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These are work-traders who earn credit towards a used bike, shop time, and parts. And court sentenced community service volunteers.

Number of Bikes Donated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Tools

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the donor reported number of bikes that were rehabed by our staff and volunteers, or parted out, or made into art, or sold to the scrap yard.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

BICAS aims to provide access to alternative forms of transportation for diverse and underrepresented communities.

Our shop offers a worktrade program which provides the opportunity for those without the means to buy a bike to earn one through volunteering their time in the shop. This credit can be used towards buying one of our donated bicycles or to using our shop to work on a bike.

BICAS has been around for almost 30 years. We have been able to get thousands of bikes onto the streets in Tucson, and into the hands of community members in need.

We hope to provide more opportunities for youth. Traditionally our space has been very education oriented, with our goals primarily concerning young people. These goals have grown to encompass our newly implemented Youth Earn A Bike program, which is similar to our worktrade program but is designed specifically for youth.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

437.94

Average of 2375.40 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.3

Average of 597.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Bootstraps to Share of Tucson’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$600 $2,481 -$49,438 $131,181 -$57,897
As % of expenses -0.2% 0.7% -11.7% 29.3% -10.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$600 $2,481 -$49,438 $131,181 -$57,897
As % of expenses -0.2% 0.7% -11.7% 29.3% -10.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $332,816 $388,925 $370,114 $629,550 $509,426
Total revenue, % change over prior year 4.8% 16.9% -4.8% 70.1% -19.1%
Program services revenue 22.6% 13.0% 13.3% 9.1% 10.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 22.8% 12.4%
All other grants and contributions 3.7% 17.7% 79.3% 63.7% 71.6%
Other revenue 10.2% 10.3% 7.4% 4.3% 5.6%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $340,429 $354,511 $421,247 $447,819 $551,310
Total expenses, % change over prior year 114522.6% 4.1% 18.8% 6.3% 23.1%
Personnel 77.8% 79.4% 81.8% 81.8% 77.1%
Professional fees 0.1% 0.3% 0.8% 4.5% 5.5%
Occupancy 8.5% 6.9% 7.2% 4.3% 3.5%
Interest 2.9% 2.7% 1.9% 1.7% 1.3%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 10.7% 10.8% 8.3% 7.7% 12.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $340,429 $354,511 $421,247 $447,819 $551,310
One month of savings $28,369 $29,543 $35,104 $37,318 $45,943
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $368,798 $384,054 $456,351 $485,137 $597,253

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.9 4.8 4.4 6.8 4.3
Months of cash and investments 4.9 4.8 4.4 6.8 4.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.0 4.6 2.5 5.8 3.5
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $137,759 $143,088 $155,083 $252,970 $195,322
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $700 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.6% 0.0% 42.7% 0.0% 0.2%
Unrestricted net assets $0 $135,927 $86,489 $217,670 $159,773
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $7,153 $2,658 $35,203 $35,203
Total net assets $133,446 $143,080 $89,147 $252,873 $194,976

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors Yes No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Principal Officer

The BICAS Collective NA

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Bootstraps to Share of Tucson

Board of directors
as of 02/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Matt Harmon

Matt Harmon

University of Arizona

Brittany Trang

Cynthia Duncan

The Haven

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No