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PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Serving youth and families involved in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems

aka Parrott Creek Child & Family Services   |   Oregon CIty, OR   |  www.pcreek.org
GuideStar Charity Check

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

EIN: 93-0591772


Mission

Parrott Creek strives to offer person-centered and culturally responsive programs and services to address social determinants of health in our community. Our goal is for all people to experience social, emotional, and physical wellbeing with justice and hope. We deliver our mission by ensuring that Parrott Creek is a unique, values-based, and empowering place to work.

Ruling year info

1976

Executive Director

Simon Fulford

Main address

1001 Molalla Ave, Suite 209 Parrott Creek Child & Family Services

Oregon CIty, OR 97045 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-0591772

Subject area info

Family services

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

LGBTQ people

Men and boys

Families

Parents

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1968, Parrott Creek has been rebuilding the lives of highly traumatized children and families involved in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Our programs range from early interventions and community support through to outpatient treatment and intensive residential services. The children and families we support are some of the most vulnerable in our communities: all come from impoverished backgrounds with high levels of trauma, abuse and Adverse Childhood Experiences, many are challenged by substance misuse, houselessness and most have histories of poor engagement in healthcare systems. Disproportionately, these children and families come from communities of color and are therefore further impacted by systemic and/or overt racism and inequality. Our approach is to address the various social, economic and health factors that cause trauma to individuals and communities and that lead to reduced access to resources, supports and opportunities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Ranch (long-term residential treatment program)

The Ranch is a long term residential treatment program for adolescent boys with a focus on developing sustainable and prosocial behaviors and skills that help them reach their full potential. The Ranch staff help youth develop life skills, accountability and personal regulation so that they can become contributing members of society.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Men and boys

Lifeguards is a community based program that provides assessment and outpatient treatment services for adolescents who exhibit sexually inappropriate behavior. Youth participate in individual, family and group therapy to provide a holistic approach to treatment and to prevent further offenses. With a priority of community safety Parrott Creek works with youth in the Lifeguards Program holding them accountable through victim and community restoration.

Population(s) Served
Families

Parrott Creek developed the Children and Mother’s Program in partnership with True Housing to address the unmet needs of young women, particularly mothers under the age of 25, who face significant barriers to affordable and stable housing, safe parenting, substance misuse treatment and long term economic self-sufficiency. Together we wanted to improve outcomes for these young women and protect their children from additional Adverse Childhood Experiences.

The program provides a continuum of care that combines STAR outreach support with transition into safe and stable housing. Parrott Creek’s STAR peer support team engages parents in treatment services and helps them access preventative healthcare support. This program provides STAR clients access to 3 Recovery Homes (total of 15 units), and homeless mothers have access to 9 scattered site apartments through the Home Safe Program.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Substance abusers
Families
Victims of crime and abuse
At-risk youth

New Era House, our newest program in partnership with the Oregon Department of Human Services, provides intensive residential support to youth in the Child Welfare system –particularly those who have been away from their families for years and have histories of failed placements. We provide a safe, stable community, free from harm, allowing them to learn skills to transition into their next home or placement. Family therapy is offered when applicable to keep youth connected with their loved ones and increase the likelihood of success.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

In April 2022 we created a new Alcohol & Drug Housing Assistance Program in partnership with the Clackamas County Behavioral Health Division. Building on our existing peer-led Traditional Health Worker model, we provide housing assistance to adults engaged in substance misuse treatment services, focusing on their recovery, retaining and/or accessing permanent housing and connecting individuals with benefits and employment options.

Our service provides housing assistance for Clackamas County residents in alcohol and drug recovery in both the urban/Metro part of the county, as well as our rural communities. Our service supports client access to, and sustained participation in, substance misuse treatment, as well as the tenuous aspects of a clients’ early recovery. Key to the success of the program, and therefore the participants, is clients becoming self-sufficient by obtaining permanent housing along with renewed and/or sustained employment.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers

Services include:

Comprehensive ASAM Assessment
Treatment plans
Group Therapy
Individual Therapy
Family education groups
Community recovery support
Compliance reports as needed
Coordination with providers and or legal references
Random Drug Screenings
Coordination with Medically Assisted Treatment providers
Client Portals
Online scheduling

Insurance options: Care Oregon, Trillium

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Substance abusers

Serving youth and young adults (15-25)

Comprehensive behavioral and mental health assessment
Individualized Treatment plans
Individual therapy
CBT-based therapeutic interventions
Psychoeducation and youth support group
Specialization in LBGTQIA+ mental health work
Coordination with outside providers
Client portals
Online screening

Insurance options: CareOregon & Trillium Community Health Plan

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Adolescents
Young adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Molalla House is a five bed independent living program in Oregon City. It supports youth aging out of foster care and who could benefit from ongoing nurturing support.

Youth receive 24 hour staff support, specialized case management, independent living skills, and the security of a stable home environment. Together with the youth, we focus on developing a solid plan for their future.

Population(s) Served

Parrott Creek recently acquired private ownership of the land at the site of our youth residential program in rural Oregon City and now aims to return this land to an ecologically and culturally functioning site through restoration practices and meaningful long-term partnerships. Major activities of this project will include the removal of invasive species such as Himalayan blackberry; removal of a fish passage barrier; planting native species such as willow, camas, wapato, and white oak; native plant surveys; fish and wildlife population monitoring; establishment of trails and bridges; and the reintroduction of prescribed burns to restore healthy fire regimes and reduce the devastation of major wildfires. The outcome of this will be ecosystem conservation, public access to natural areas, access to usual and accustomed gathering of first foods and basketry materials for Indigenous communities, and environmental education for both guests and youth in the residential program.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adolescents
Foster and adoptive children
At-risk youth
Adolescents
Foster and adoptive children
At-risk youth
American Indians
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth service participants who have involvement in juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

The Ranch (long-term residential treatment program)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Children & Mothers Progra

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of foster youth with housing arrangements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is to become a regional center of excellence in service to children, youth and families. Our primary goals over the next three years are to:
Provide a campus suitable to the services we provide - now and well in to the future
Create a culture of excellence with a well-trained, well-resourced staff and board
Provide diversified and comprehensive clinical and early-intervention services to meet our community’s evolving needs
Ensure partnerships of trust within the juvenile justice, child welfare and children’s services sectors, as well as with communities of color

Every year, we help over 800 children and families to overcome trauma and believe in their potential to succeed. Our mission is to help our participants identify strengths and develop skills that build stronger families and safer communities. We build effective partnerships to align services, maximize resources and provide an equitable and inclusive continuum of care for our participants. At its heart, we believe our children and families are smart, capable and doing the best they can with the resources they have available to them. Our job is to help them reach their full potential.

Our services span from early interventions and community support through to outpatient treatment and intensive residential programs. Our Residential Treatment Programs benefit boys ages 13-18, located in Clackamas County and serving youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Programs include:
· The Ranch, long-term residential treatment that lasts typically seven to nine months, helps boys involved in the juvenile justice system understand the impacts of their behaviors, learn personal regulation and develop the life skills needed to succeed in school, at home, and in society.
· New Era House, a new program in partnership with Oregon Department of Human Services, that provides residential treatment for youth in the Child Welfare system. The program helps alleviate the need for Oregon to place youth out of state and to better nurture and care for them close to home. This program works with highly traumatized youth, those with high Adverse Childhood Experience scores, as well as treating and supporting youth with sexually inappropriate behaviors.

Our community based programs include:
· Lifeguards: provides assessment and outpatient treatment services for adolescents with sexually harming behaviors and who have been adjudicated.
· Steps to Active Recovery (STAR): works with parents who are involved with the Child Welfare system due to alcohol or drug abuse allegations. Our peer support workers connect clients to services that focus on substance use treatment and parenting skills.

In 2020, we developed three new partnerships that will support a broader, more equitable and longer lasting impact for youth and families and our communities:

We entered into a strategic partnership with True Housing (formerly The Inn Home) to align our services along a robust continuum of care. True Housing, like Parrott Creek, has a 50+ year history of providing services in Oregon. Under our management, we will jointly provide:
-Women and Mother's Program
-Residential and Independent Living Programs
-Youth Homeless Demonstration Program

Using a collective impact model, Safe Kids Clackamas is a coalition of community organizations that have come together to ensure the critical services that deliver the safety, permanency and well-being of children in our community are available and accessible whenever needed. These services include trauma-informed intervention in cases of child abuse and family and intimate partner violence. The founding members of the coalition are: Clackamas Women’s Services, Northwest Family Services, The Children’s Center, CASA of Clackamas County and Parrott Creek.

We are collaborating with Friends of Tryon Creek (FOTC) on our new Cultural Environmental Education & Trauma Healing Project. The program combines environmental education that honors the culture of native land stewardship with the healing power of the natural world through indigenous practices.

Parrott Creek has been serving youth and families for over 50 years and, during that time, has developed a strong grounding and expertise in the provision of acute programs and services for highly traumatized children and adults. Parrott Creek also ensures its programs remain current by researching emerging best-practices in treatment and support methodologies. We are active members of the Oregon Alliance of Children’s Programs, the Restorative Justice Coalition of Oregon, the Safe Kids Coalition of Clackamas County and Oregon City Together, as well as many other local, community-based forums and working groups. The bulk of our programs and services have to be licensed by state agencies, which requires that we demonstrate quality assurance standards on an ongoing basis through both planned and unannounced inspections and audits. As of 2020 our behavioral health services will also be accredited by the Joint Commission, a national body that accredits more than 22,000 health and social care organizations and programs across America.

Since 1968, we have served more than 25,000 youth and families and currently serve 800 families per year in Oregon. Parrott Creek is effective, with 88% of youth staying out of the juvenile system following treatment. Additionally, we are recognized as a leader in our field: we are highly regarded by the Oregon Youth Authority and Clackamas County Juvenile Department, and we achieve high ratings on our annual Behavioral Rehabilitative Services (BRS) reviews. For three years in a row, an independent evaluation team from Oregon juvenile justice agencies has rated our residential treatment program "highly effective" using the evidence-based Correctional Program Checklist (CPC). Only 7% of programs nationally are rated at this level. We expect to continue being a highly effective alternative to juvenile detention or incarceration.

Please see the document section for our 2020-23 Strategic Plan for more information.

Financials

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.15

Average of 3.68 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.5

Average of 4.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

20%

Average of 19% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$256,642 $13,908 $493,767 $686,117 $1,203,628
As % of expenses -11.2% 0.7% 21.7% 22.8% 30.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$266,277 -$1,743 $447,153 $633,553 $1,149,796
As % of expenses -11.6% -0.1% 19.3% 20.7% 28.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,053,124 $2,702,896 $3,979,417 $3,674,809 $7,387,639
Total revenue, % change over prior year -5.8% 31.6% 47.2% -7.7% 101.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 2.1% 4.6% 1.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.4%
Government grants 86.5% 71.9% 64.5% 61.9% 54.8%
All other grants and contributions 13.3% 30.4% 34.1% 32.8% 52.4%
Other revenue 0.3% -2.4% -0.8% 0.5% -9.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,293,698 $2,137,827 $2,275,291 $3,006,175 $3,984,260
Total expenses, % change over prior year 6.0% -6.8% 6.4% 32.1% 32.5%
Personnel 78.6% 74.8% 74.3% 69.0% 67.7%
Professional fees 2.4% 5.7% 6.0% 13.8% 4.0%
Occupancy 5.9% 6.4% 5.6% 5.3% 8.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 5.3% 5.4% 5.4% 5.0% 10.1%
All other expenses 7.8% 7.7% 8.7% 6.9% 9.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,303,333 $2,153,478 $2,321,905 $3,058,739 $4,038,092
One month of savings $191,142 $178,152 $189,608 $250,515 $332,022
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $309,200 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $186,205 $824,957 $152,988 $329,930
Total full costs (estimated) $2,494,475 $2,517,835 $3,645,670 $3,462,242 $4,700,044

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 1.5 5.7 7.9 8.6 13.5
Months of cash and investments 1.5 5.7 7.9 8.6 13.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.7 0.8 -1.0 1.4 3.7
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $292,005 $1,014,948 $1,496,509 $2,154,409 $4,470,602
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $166,504 $171,427 $277,269 $1,163,861 $1,219,837
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $644,902 $831,107 $1,462,917 $1,615,905 $1,729,702
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 43.2% 35.4% 10.1% 12.4% 2.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 21.1% 29.0% 7.6% 26.4% 12.8%
Unrestricted net assets $682,553 $680,810 $1,127,963 $1,761,516 $2,911,312
Temporarily restricted net assets $38,308 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $38,308 $589,469 $1,799,828 $1,782,345 $3,982,096
Total net assets $720,861 $1,270,279 $2,927,791 $3,543,861 $6,893,408

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Simon Fulford

Simon Fulford is a seasoned nonprofit leader who has worked in the US, UK, France & South Africa. Living in New York from 1992-2004, Simon co-founded and directed Art Start, an arts-education organization serving socially-excluded youth. Art Start was honored with a President’s Service Award in 1997. During the same time, Simon also worked as a photographer and advocate in the disabled community, a role that brought him regularly to Oregon to work with local partners. Returning to England in 2005 Simon project managed the launch of the National Disability Arts Collection & Archive and joined The Prince’s Trust, one of the UK’s leading youth-serving nonprofits, spending three years as a Regional Director. In 2010 Simon became Chief Executive of Khulisa UK, an arm of Khulisa Social Solutions: South Africa’s leading violence-reduction, youth diversion and restorative justice provider.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

PARROTT CREEK CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

Board of directors
as of 02/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Glenn Wachter

Assistant Vice President, Providence St. Joseph Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser