PLATINUM2024

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

TOGETHER We CAN Solve Hunger.

aka Community Food Bank of Central Alabama   |   Birmingham, AL   |  www.feedingAL.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

EIN: 63-0837956


Mission

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We believe no one in Alabama should go hungry. We believe there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. For every person who is currently in need, there are even more people in Alabama willing and able to reach out with a helping hand.

Ruling year info

1983

Chief Executive Officer

Nicole Williams

Main address

107 Walter Davis Drive

Birmingham, AL 35209 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

United Way Community Food Bank

EIN

63-0837956

Subject area info

Basic and emergency aid

Food banks

Population served info

Children and youth

Young adults

Older adults

Seniors

Families

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger and health are deeply connected, and interventions are needed for community health and well-being. But when people do not have enough food or must choose inexpensive foods with low-nutritional value, it can seriously impact their health. Hunger statistics for central Alabama are sobering - one in five people and one in four children in central Alabama are food insecure. The Community Food Bank provided 16.8 million meals last year but despite its commendable efforts, the estimated need stands at a staggering 33 million meals annually according to Feeding America. There is an urgent and critical need right here in central Alabama. The Food Bank needs our community’s support to bridge this critical gap and ensure no one goes hungry.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agency Network of Partners

We believe no one should go hungry and that there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama: Jefferson, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Counties. In 2022, we distributed over 20.2 million lbs. of food, equaling 16.8 million meals to the 1 in 5 individuals experiencing food insecurity in our service area.

We accomplish our mission by providing food to over 220 agency partners, including food pantries, shelters, and children’s programs, who offer direct service. We provide them with food safety training and supply food, and they distribute it free of charge to our neighbors in need. Together through our agency partners, we are working to solve hunger one meal at a time.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Social and economic status
Health
Ethnic and racial groups

Summer Meals (Summer Food Service Program or SFSP)
Community Food Bank’s Summer Meals Program provides free, healthy meals to children ages 18 and under during the summer when school is not in session. A partnership between the Community Food Bank, the Alabama State Department of Education, the Alabama Food Bank Association, and community organizations, Summer Meals provides free lunch and snacks to children throughout central Alabama five days a week, all summer. All meals served through the program are completely free of charge, not only to participating children but also to partner sites.

Family Markets
Family Markets provide food access to households with children in need through ‘drive-thru’ grocery distributions. Partners include public schools and other community organizations uniquely equipped to serve households with kids.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Mobile Pantries
Our Mobile Pantries provide food access to households in need through ‘drive-thru’ grocery distributions.

Client-Choice Pantry Distributions
Client-Choice Pantry Distributions provide our neighbors in need the opportunity to choose what foods would work best for their cultural and nutritional dietary needs.

Population(s) Served

During times of crisis, the Community Food Bank is ready to step in and provide emergency assistance when and where needed most. We provide emergency food and water in times of crisis like tornadoes or floods, establish temporary emergency food pantries in affected communities, and work with our network of agency partners to support the community. We work in concert with the Emergency Management Association (EMA) to help when and where it is most needed. Often our role is to support the community for the long term, in the months following a disaster, after the first responders and one-time donations are gone.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Religious groups
Social and economic status

Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)
The Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) works to improve the health of people with low incomes at least 60 years of age by supplementing their diets with nutritious USDA Foods. USDA distributes food and administrative funds to participating states and Indian Tribal Organizations to operate CSFP.

Senior Grocery Mobile Pantries
Senior Grocery Mobile Pantries provide food access to households with seniors in need through 'drive-thru' grocery distributions.

Senior Client-Choice Pantry Distributions
Senior Client-Choice Pantry Distributions provide our neighbors the opportunity to choose what foods work best for their cultural and nutritional dietary needs. Partners include Senior Centers and other organizations that can provide food access to the senior population in their communities.

Senior Grocery Home Delivery Hubs
Senior Grocery Home Delivery Hubs are designed to provide food access to seniors facing hunger through home delivery.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

At the Community Food Bank, sustainability is key. Our fleet of refrigerated trucks is on the road 5 days per week picking up donated food from our retail partners to distribute throughout our community.

-Recruited over 100 grocery stores to donate wholesome fresh produce, meats, and dry goods.
-Prevents food from going to waste in local landfills & instead provides meals to neighbors in need.
-Annually we save over 7 million pounds of produce, proteins, and dry goods from being discarded.

In 2020, we recovered over $12 million worth of food, and work every day to ensure no food goes to waste.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Social and economic status
Religious groups
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Social and economic status
Religious groups

Where we work

Awards

Community Partner of the Year 2015

Junior League of Birmingham

Living Our Values Award 2019

Feeding America

Shcweitzer Fellow Outstanding Community Mentor Award 2019

Albert Shcweitzer Fellowship

Non-Profit Organization of the Year 2019

Les Dames d'Escoffier, Birmingham

Nonprofit of the Year, Category 2 2010

Birmingham Business Allaince

Affiliations & memberships

Alabama Association of Nonprofits 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Health, Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Religious groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe no one should go hungry and that there is a solution to the problem of hunger in Alabama. The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama feeds people in need today and fosters collaborative solutions to end hunger tomorrow. We serve 12 counties in central Alabama: Jefferson, Blount, Calhoun, Cherokee, Clay, Cleburne, Etowah, Talladega, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Counties. In 2022, we distributed over 20.2 million lbs. of food equaling over 16.8 million meals.

We accomplish our mission by providing food to over 220 agency partners, including food pantries, shelters, and children’s programs, who offer direct service to our neighbors in need. To fill the gaps, both geographically and demographically, we also offer programs to serve specific populations vulnerable to hunger. Together through our agency partners and direct service programs, we can end hunger one meal at a time.

1) CFB and our partners provide food for anyone in Central Alabama struggling with food insecurity. This includes children, seniors, families, and individuals facing financial hardship or illness, individuals with disabilities or living on a fixed income, those living with limited access to healthy food (living in food deserts), those without reliable transportation, and working households who do not make a living wage.

2) Since the COVID-19 pandemic, CFB has seen a tremendous surge in need, with thousands of jobs lost and families struggling even more to pay bills and have reliable access to nutritious foods. In 2021 across CFB's 12 county service area, the overall food insecurity rate was 16.8% and 20.4% among children. That's 1 in 5 people and 1 in 4 children who do not have access to enough food to lead healthy, active lives. From January 2021 to January 2022, groceries rose by 10%, with meat including poultry, eggs, and dairy rising over 14%. Inflation continues to exacerbate prices, with food prices already 5.8% higher than last summer. The far-reaching effects of inflation and supply chain issues continue to make it harder for our neighbors to provide for their families.

3) Our direct food access programs fill the gap that wages and government benefits leave--providing food so families and individuals can afford to pay medical bills, utilies, rent, education expenses, and other necessities. We collaborate with Alabama Department of Public Health and Samford University's Department of Nutrition and Dietetics to ensure quality nutrition and health education.

The Community Food Bank of Central Alabama operates as a food distribution center. We receive products from several food industry sources, as well as excess food reclaimed from local grocery stores and community donations. In turn, we distribute that food to over 220 nonprofits in the community who act as our agency partners. The agencies receive food from the Community Food Bank and distribute that food to those in need.

We do not distribute food directly from our facility, but we operate several public food distributions and meal programs to ensure that the needs of especially vulnerable populations are met. When we identify a gap, either geographically or demographically, that leaves specific populations vulnerable to hunger, we operate direct meal programs that foster healthy food access for those at risk of hunger.

In 2022, we distributed over 20.2 million lbs. of food equaling over 16.8 million meals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19.14

Average of 44.82 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.9

Average of 3.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23%

Average of 28% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Community Food Bank of Central Alabama’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $512,676 $2,886,948 $5,751,284 $5,467,483 -$2,870,418
As % of expenses 2.5% 12.4% 16.0% 17.7% -8.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $329,799 $2,701,363 $5,484,187 $5,098,675 -$3,262,544
As % of expenses 1.6% 11.6% 15.1% 16.3% -9.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $21,236,832 $26,151,339 $43,987,647 $33,855,843 $33,309,464
Total revenue, % change over prior year 250.6% 23.1% 68.2% -23.0% -1.6%
Program services revenue 7.2% 6.1% 3.4% 4.3% 4.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.3%
Government grants 16.2% 33.1% 50.3% 39.1% 30.3%
All other grants and contributions 76.4% 60.6% 46.2% 56.3% 65.9%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.2% -0.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $20,497,599 $23,189,194 $36,033,274 $30,843,484 $35,861,486
Total expenses, % change over prior year 322.9% 13.1% 55.4% -14.4% 16.3%
Personnel 5.3% 5.0% 3.5% 6.5% 6.9%
Professional fees 0.1% 0.1% 0.4% 0.5% 0.6%
Occupancy 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.5% 0.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 90.8% 91.1% 93.3% 88.8% 87.9%
All other expenses 3.1% 3.4% 2.6% 3.7% 3.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $20,680,476 $23,374,779 $36,300,371 $31,212,292 $36,253,612
One month of savings $1,708,133 $1,932,433 $3,002,773 $2,570,290 $2,988,457
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $380,514 $1,574,280 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $22,388,609 $25,687,726 $40,877,424 $33,782,582 $39,242,069

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.6 2.2 3.6 4.9 3.9
Months of cash and investments 1.6 2.2 3.6 4.9 3.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.6 3.3 3.5 6.1 4.2
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $2,747,689 $4,296,488 $10,944,536 $12,594,997 $11,562,723
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $252,123 $332,458 $343,818 $277,635 $534,206
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,051,802 $3,432,316 $5,006,596 $5,163,831 $5,305,320
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 49.0% 49.0% 38.9% 41.2% 46.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 21.3% 0.1% 7.1% 1.9% 3.7%
Unrestricted net assets $4,239,035 $8,194,938 $13,679,125 $18,777,800 $15,515,256
Temporarily restricted net assets $465,768 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $465,768 $540,965 $2,744,054 $505,112 $791,936
Total net assets $4,704,803 $8,735,903 $16,423,179 $19,282,912 $16,307,192

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Nicole Williams

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Community Food Bank of Central Alabama

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ellie Taylor

Alabama Grocers Association

Term: 2023 - 2024

Gerry Kasouf

Kassouf & Company

Ellie Taylor

Alabama Grocers' Association

George Bradford

Mrs. Statton's Salads

Mary Alice Kline

Iberia Bank

David Wood

Wood Fruitticher

David Bell

C&S Foods

Khalilah Brown

Jefferson County Health Department

Susana Schuler

Hearst Media, WVTM13

Brad Jones

Cushman Wakefield

Bill Kreis

JohnsonKreis Construction

Alyson Tucker

Alabama Power

Joseph Ritchey

Dentons Sirote

Clyde Tisdale

Regions Bank

R. Ed Goodwin

Western Supermarkets

Miriam Gaines

Samford University

David LeCompte

Bridgeworth Wealth Management

James Mowery

Publix Supermarkets

Phil Webb

Webb Concrete & Building Materials, Inc

Josh Wellen

Enterprise

David Wilson

UPS Healthcare

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/23/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/27/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser