PLATINUM2024

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Helping families tackle childhood cancer

aka Jay Fund   |   Jacksonville Beach, FL   |  www.tcjayfund.org
GuideStar Charity Check

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

EIN: 59-3426937


Mission

The mission of the Tom Coughlin Jay Fund is to help families tackle childhood cancer by providing comprehensive financial, emotional and practical support. From diagnosis to recovery and beyond, we are part of the team, allowing parents to solely focus on their child's well being. Our goal is to BE THERE for parents facing the unthinkable so they can be there for their families.

Ruling year info

1997

CEO

Mrs. Keli Coughlin

Main address

PO Box 50798

Jacksonville Beach, FL 32240 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-3426937

Subject area info

Leukemia

Human services

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every 3 minutes somewhere in the world a family hears “your child has cancer”. The average cost for each case of childhood cancer is a startling $833,000. That does not include out-of-pocket expenses like traveling to the hospital and extra childcare at home. Approximately 1/4 of families tackling pediatric cancer will lose 40% of their household income because of prolonged absences or loss of job all together.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Financial Support

Helping families through Financial Assistance:
The financial burden created when a child is hospitalized or requires home care, combined with medical expenses, can become overwhelming for parents. Jay Fund grants pay for such things as mortgages, rent, car, electric, water, phone, food, and other household expense payments during a time of crisis.
Jay’s Financial Playbook:
Each family receives a backpack with an organizer so families have the tools to manage their child’s appointments, keep important contact information, and track medical and other expenses.
Quarterly Financial Seminar:
Our quarterly seminar entitled Managing the Financial Challenges of Childhood Cancer, does what it says. It gives you information, insight and support you need to manage your finances during your battle.
Financial Coaching:
We also offer a Financial “Coach” who will sit down with individual families and devise a plan to address any financial concerns. We can help develop and implement a budget, understand assets and liabilities and assist in making some difficult decisions to improve your financial health. We’ll BE THERE to help you make it through this financially challenging process.
Scholarships:
The Jay Fund also offers scholarships to brave patients and survivors who wish to continue their education. We’ll BE THERE to help them achieve their dreams.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Another important way we can BE THERE for families is to support treatment facilities that help improve quality of life for the patient and families. Our grants support child psychology services, Child Life programs, Art with a Heart program funding, survivorship programs, special medical equipment, entertainment, games and more at outpatient and inpatient centers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The financial support we provide is invaluable to families. But the emotional support is equally important to our mission. We offer once-in-a-lifetime opportunities that simply make a child’s life brighter and create happy memories. We also host special, fun events so families and children can come together with others facing the same challenges. This enables families battling childhood cancer to BE THERE for each other with emotional support, love and friendship.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Requests for emergency household expense support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses, Families

Related Program

Financial Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Incomplete data prior to 2017 as level of detail reporting was not required through partnerships in the New York/New Jersey area.

Unique number of families receiving emergency household expense support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses, Families

Related Program

Financial Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Incomplete data prior to 2017 as level of detail reporting was not required through partnerships in the New York/New Jersey area.

Events, special experiences, or support group activities provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses, Families

Related Program

Making a Child's Life Brighter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To help ease some of the financial burdens families face while tackling childhood cancer. The goal of the Jay Fund is to BE THERE for families so parents can BE THERE for their sick child.

The Jay Fund provides financial, emotional, and practical support, like keeping a roof over their heads, food on the table, and the lights on.

With the support of the community and the resources, the organization has been expanding on the scope of programming for families tackling childhood cancer for 28 years. The Jay Fund believes that a cancer diagnosis affects the entire family, therefore strives to help everyone in the family through events, mom's retreats, sibling support, and more.

Over the past 28 years, the Jay Fund has provided $24 million in assistance to over 5,600 families. In 2023, the Jay Fund provided $4,825,498 in total assistance for 801 families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, Overcoming language barriers to our surveys has been a challenge.

Financials

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

56.78

Average of 170.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.9

Average of 13.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13%

Average of 10% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $66,739 $4,348,085 $3,864,818 $4,087,556 -$3,579,370
As % of expenses 2.7% 158.0% 143.2% 113.8% -95.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $46,631 $4,306,565 $3,824,135 $4,045,322 -$3,619,266
As % of expenses 1.9% 154.1% 139.6% 111.3% -96.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,880,615 $3,804,662 $3,799,077 $3,906,630 $4,637,392
Total revenue, % change over prior year -6.3% -2.0% -0.1% 2.8% 18.7%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 9.7% 23.7% 15.6% 0.4% 4.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 90.3% 76.3% 84.4% 99.6% 96.3%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -0.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,453,076 $2,752,769 $2,698,420 $3,593,383 $3,731,026
Total expenses, % change over prior year 11.2% 12.2% -2.0% 33.2% 3.8%
Personnel 30.2% 30.2% 35.1% 29.3% 26.3%
Professional fees 0.5% 0.9% 0.3% -0.1% 0.0%
Occupancy 1.2% 0.4% 0.4% 1.4% 1.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 60.9% 58.8% 56.4% 65.7% 64.1%
All other expenses 7.2% 9.6% 7.8% 3.8% 8.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,473,184 $2,794,289 $2,739,103 $3,635,617 $3,770,922
One month of savings $204,423 $229,397 $224,868 $299,449 $310,919
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $120,376 $0
Fixed asset additions $209,702 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,887,309 $3,023,686 $2,963,971 $4,055,442 $4,081,841

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 23.3 22.5 25.4 13.5 9.9
Months of cash and investments 109.1 117.4 138.0 119.3 101.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 68.5 80.0 98.7 87.8 73.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $4,768,569 $5,149,987 $5,709,934 $4,034,147 $3,081,679
Investments $17,543,228 $21,770,618 $25,316,821 $31,681,737 $28,442,497
Receivables $461,014 $260,410 $79,284 $205,750 $330,500
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $273,294 $275,916 $281,186 $255,484 $127,768
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 13.9% 28.8% 41.7% 50.0% 41.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.5% 0.9% 1.0% 2.7% 1.7%
Unrestricted net assets $14,247,836 $18,541,842 $22,365,977 $26,411,299 $22,792,033
Temporarily restricted net assets $15,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $8,663,794 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $8,678,794 $8,710,374 $8,695,374 $8,695,374 $8,755,374
Total net assets $22,926,630 $27,252,216 $31,061,351 $35,106,673 $31,547,407

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Mrs. Keli Coughlin

Keli began in a volunteer capacity with the Tom Coughlin Jay Fund in 1998 primarily focusing on the planning of the Celebrity Golf Classic under the tutelage of Fran Foley. Keli became passionate about the cause when she had the opportunity to meet some of the families helped by the Jay Fund. She gradually expanded her role in the Foundation and increased the services provided to families in need. Keli was named Executive Director for the Tom Coughlin Jay Fund Foundation August 1, 2004. Keli has made a significant impact on the growth of the Jay Fund and was instrumental in expanding the Jay Fund's services to the NY/NJ area.

Keli earned an undergraduate degree in Exercise Science from Auburn University and received her Masters of Science in Athletic Training from Michigan State University. Keli resides in Atlantic Beach, Florida with her husband and two daughters. Keli served as the Head Athletic Trainer at the University of North Florida prior to joining the Jay Fund full time.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

THE TOM COUGHLIN JAY FUND FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 03/05/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Tom Coughlin

Ernie Bono, Sr.

Dr. Michael Joyce

Nemours Children's Clinic

Ernie Bono, Jr.

Gary Chartrand

Brian Coughlin

Bedell Firm

Susan DuBow

Joanne Robertson

Anne Mesrobian

Shelly Kobb

Michael Lewis

Dr. Saundra Jackson

Sandra Ramsey

Kevin Boothe

Tom Kelly

Mike McGillis

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/05/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.