PLATINUM2024

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

ACA - An artist residency community

aka Arts on Douglas   |   New Smyrna Beach, FL   |  www.atlanticcenterforthearts.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

EIN: 59-1998321


Mission

Atlantic Center for the Arts (ACA) is a nonprofit 501 (c)(3), interdisciplinary artists-in-residence community and arts education facility dedicated to promoting artistic excellence by providing talented artists an opportunity to work and collaborate with some of the world's most distinguished contemporary artists in the fields of music composition and the visual, literary and performing arts. Community interaction is coordinated through on-site and outreach presentations, workshops and exhibitions.

Ruling year info

1980

Executive Director

Ms. Nancy Lowden Norman

Main address

1414 Art Center Avenue

New Smyrna Beach, FL 32168 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-1998321

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Arts education

Environment

Youth organizing

Senior services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Adults

Seniors

Families

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Atlantic Center for the Arts is trying to overcome barriers so that: • art education can be made available to everyone • artists of all disciplines have an opportunity to explore, create and form interdisciplinary collaborations • the most renowned Master Artists and highest quality Associate Artists come to ACA to inspire and collaborate with their peers • ACA’s infrastructure (a 10-acre campus and an arts complex in downtown New Smyrna Beach) is maintained • dialogues within the arts, locally, nationally and internationally continue to be cultivated

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Residency Program

Atlantic Center’s residency program brings together three renowned "mentoring" artists from different disciplines to work with "associate" artists for three-weeks of master classes, individual critiques, opportunities for collaboration, and private studio time. The interdisciplinary program includes the visual, literary and performing arts, with a contemporary emphasis. It encourages collaboration and exchange and nurtures introspection and reflection. As of June 2022, 186 residencies have taken place serving over 5,500 artists from around the world. ACA's residency program is celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2022 and continues to be the starting point for new works, which are often produced at national venues. While the work done in ACA’s residency program becomes an integral part of our nation’s cultural fabric, it is also the place where the community has access to a world-renowned international artists’ community and to the most revered artists of our time.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Children’s Art Programs target diverse audiences and the underserved, including at-risk, challenged, and economically disadvantaged children. Thousands of area children are directly served through in-house and outreach programs. Year-round hands-on art workshops feature programs in sculpture, mixed media, painting, drawing, bookmaking, printmaking, jewelry, mask making, fiber arts, journaling, cooking and performance. An eight week Summer Art Camp allows children to explore art and culture during hands-on multidisciplinary sessions that include visual arts, movement, and music. Every child from Summer Art Camp exhibits in the Young Masters show, held in August at ACA’s Harris House Gallery, with one work by each child on display. Scholarships provided for all programs, with 40%-50% (increased from 30%) of participants receiving financial assistance.Atlantic Center also has arts education partnerships with area schools, and a community artist who works in the classroom and with organizations such as the Babe James Youth Center.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Community programs serve over 3,500 youth yearly. These free programs are offered at schools by visiting artists, as well as after school to students living in the low-moderate income boundary of New Smyrna Beach’s Westside. These programs ensure students are exposed to the arts, while supporting Common Core standards. Therapeutic mixed-media journaling and Intuitive painting workshops presented by artists help reduce stress among underserved youth, those in foster care, and those who are in fear of being homeless. Programs by disabled artists elicit understanding and awareness, and reduce bullying to those with disabilities. Utilizing the “Caregiver’s Toolkit” with caregivers and their loved ones, and intergenerationally among our Teen Volunteers and their grandparents, ACA is setting the bar for creating substantive experiences with those with cognitive disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. Workshops are held at Harris House, and at caregiver respite meetings.

Population(s) Served
Families
Seniors

The Pabst Visitor Center and Gallery at ACA features changing and permanent exhibitions by contemporary masters. The Jack Mitchell Portrait Gallery showcases 180 Master Artist photographs spanning 22 years, from Atlantic Center's inaugural residency in 1982 to the end of 2004. Arts on Douglas was established in 1996 as a commercial gallery to promote the work and careers of professional artists from Florida. It has since formalized its affiliation with ACA, combining missions, resources and programs, to facilitate community engagement with the creative arts. Located in historic downtown New Smyrna Beach, the building is a 3,500 sq. ft. exhibition space that presents 18 exhibitions a year.  Atlantic Center's Harris House Gallery hosts exhibitions including "Young Masters," an annual exhibit showcasing the work of talented youngsters ages 6-12 and "Volusia County Select," an annual juried exhibition showcasing the work of local high school artists.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

One of the top juried art festivals in the Southeast, IMAGES: A Festival of the Arts attracts some of the finest artists in painting, glass, sculpture, and wood from across the country. Held in picturesque Riverside Park in downtown historic New Smyrna Beach, the three-day Festival attracts 45,000 arts enthusiasts who stroll the park, purchase art, listen to live music, and enjoy a diverse festival menu. Children love the Creative Education tent, where they can make their own art at hands-on projects stations, and the Student Art Exhibit, featuring the work of 100 children from 12 schools in Volusia County.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 1982

Americans for the Arts 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, LGBTQ people, Adults, Heterosexuals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our audience is intergenerational and our programs reach all members of the community, from school children to seniors. Our audience is returning to previous numbers after the Covid-19 pandemic.

Number of professional artists employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Artists and performers

Related Program

Exhibitions

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

ACA supports working artists through its residencies, gallery exhibitions, arts and wellness programs, and an annual professional art festival.

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Exhibitions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Exhibitions are free and open to the public at ACA's Pabst Visitor Center & Gallery, Arts on Douglas art gallery, and Harris House community art center.

Total number of awarded residencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Women, Heterosexuals, Adults, Men

Related Program

Residency Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Since ACA's residency program began in 1982, we have conducted 195 residencies, an average of 4 each year. We also welcome artists, such as OneBeat, in residence.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Retired people

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Expertise is provided by board members and trained volunteers. Volunteer hours decreased due to Covid-19, but we expect the number of volunteer hours to rebound to years previous to the pandemic.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ACA welcomes and encourages collaboration. Partners are diverse and include universities, schools, health care agencies/facilities, cultural organizations, blind services, and veteran groups.

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Families, LGBTQ people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of works restored or preserved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Heterosexuals, LGBTQ people

Related Program

Residency Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Atlantic Center for the Arts has established five strategic pillars to provide strength to the organization and has developed associated goals to guide it.

1. Funding – Increase long-term and operating capital with diverse funding sources to support ACA and its programs.

2. Communication – Use web, social media, and traditional media tools to promote ACA's position as a catalyst for artistic excellence and individual creativity.

3. Programs, Diversity, Access – To foster artistic excellence through residencies, community programs, and continuing artist engagement; ensure all of ACA’s work is reflective of our diverse population and accessible to all.

4. Facilities/Infrastructure – Maintain, improve, and leverage our most visible resources; support the systems that enable the work of ACA.

5. Thought Leadership – Establish ACA as a leading authority and champion for the arts regionally and nationally.

Strategies in support of Goal #1: Increase long-term and operating capital with diverse funding sources to support ACA and its programs

• Activate ACA constituents, the arts community, stakeholders, and the public to ensure strong support and secure additional financial
resources
• Diversify and increase grant/foundation support
• Increase endowments
• Increase smart-use, revenue, and creative partnerships

Strategies in support of Goal #2: Use web, social media, and traditional media tools to promote ACA's position as a catalyst for artistic excellence and individual creativity.
• Use technology to maximize accessibility
• Demonstrate history by archiving ACA materials, events, milestones and stories, past and present
• Keep lines of communication with constituents and stakeholders open

Strategies in support of Goal #3: To foster artistic excellence through residencies, community programs, and continuing artist engagement; ensure all of ACA’s work is reflective of our diverse population and accessible to all
• Enhance the Associate Artist experience and ensure that the program receives additional financial support
• Strengthen partnerships locally through interdisciplinary programming
• Provide caregivers and their loved ones with more substantive experiences with one another through the arts; reduce stress and other
benefits for the underserved and special populations
• Continue to highlight Florida artists and provide quality, engaging exhibition opportunities

Strategies in support of Goal #4: Maintain, improve, and leverage our most visible resources; support the systems that enable the work of ACA
• Ensure that organizational resources are inventoried and valued in terms of land/buildings each year
• Ensure that repairs at all facilities are “upgraded” to reduce carbon footprint and decrease expenses
• Ensure that technology is a help, not a hindrance, to staff and artists

Strategies in support of Goal #5: Establish ACA as a leading authority and champion for the arts regionally and nationally
• Champion the best work of artists and arts organizations and help to develop new avenues of support for innovative, impactful work
• Provide services to our constituents so that they will grow and thrive
• Use institutional knowledge and ACA’s widespread access to international, national, regional and local arts leaders to exchange
information and access new resources

Atlantic Center for the Arts has strong leadership, including an active board with members who have served for over 10 years, an Executive Director with over 24 years at the organization and two management staff members with over 20 years each at the organization. The staff is diverse in age and skills, allowing for collaborations that generate new ideas, best practices, and shared experience and history. This fuels the organization with innovation and creativity while maintaining institutional memory and a proud sense of history.

We are unique in having a National Council. This advisory board is comprised of world-renowned artists with deep roots in their disciplines. ACA seeks recommendations and guidance from the National Council Members for our Master Artists and input for our artist residency programs. In additional, the National Council Members introduce ACA to potential artistic partners, board members and supporters.

ACA builds long-term partnerships to collaborate, promote awareness, and engage as many individuals as possible in arts education and programming. Our partners include: University of Central Florida, Stetson University, Bethune Cookman University, Daytona State College, Council on Aging, Volusia County Schools, Volusia County Library System, Valencia College. Timucua White House, Enzian Theater, National Center for Creative Aging, and University of Florida, to name but a few.

Our facility was built expressly as an Artist-in-Residence community, allowing us to provide all artists the resources, materials, space, and equipment they need. All our buildings and walkways are ADA compliant providing access to the arts to all. Atlantic Center for the Arts was built on 68 acres, therefore, the ability to grow with the needs of artists is an opportunity we can seize for the future.

With its 43-year history, ACA has been in the forefront of innovative and culturally enriching programming, and we are very proud of our long track record of excellence.

ACA'S residency program, established in 1977 by artist Doris Leeper, brings together internationally acclaimed master artists with talented mid-career and emerging artists who are selected by the masters. The residency program is one of the world's most renowned. ACA officially opened in 1982 for the first residency. As of November 2019, 175 residencies have taken place, serving almost 5,000 artists from Florida, the United States, and around the world, including Master Artists who have been awarded: 26 Pulitzer Prizes, 9 Emmys, 142 NEA Fellowships, 108 Guggenheim Fellowships, 3 Grammys, 2 Oscars, 30 MacArthur "Genius" Awards, 28 Obies, 11 Bessies, 3 Poet Laureates, and 7 National Book Awards.

Throughout the years, we have increased the scope of our community programs. Over 250 creative activities, programs, classes, and workshops serve more than 72,000 people each year. We support 100+ artists in their research and development of new work and engage and pay over 50 local area artists to serve as community arts instructors.

Our diverse audience comes from all over Florida, the United States, and from countries around the world.

The most recent Americans for the Arts study, the Arts & Economic Prosperity Calculator indicates ACA provides nearly $3 million in total economic impact, generating 79.9 FTE jobs, $1,437,999 in household income, $104,207 of local government revenue and $123,992 of state government revenue annually.

ACA is located on 68 pristine acres, part of the original Turnbull settlement founded 250 years ago, and adjacent to an environmental preserve of 2,200 acres. Because of its unique location, ACA has become a destination for cultural, architectural, historical, and environmental tourists as well as business retreats, university programming, trade workshops, weddings, photo shoots, and film productions.

In 2017, the organization paid off its line of credit that had been outstanding since 2003. The endowment accounts continue to grow.
We are currently focused on raising funds for two new initiatives:
1. A matching gift opportunity for the unrestricted Buildings and Structures fund is a $250,000 challenge grant that will give us a total of $500,000 toward the sustainability of our physical physical assets, including the Leeper Studio Complex, the winner of 8 national architectural awards.
2. Chuck and Margie Pabst Steinmetz have offered $250,000 in matching funds to build a restricted scholarship fund so that we can reduce – and eventually eliminate – all fees for all Associate Artists accepted into a residency.

We continue to provide and expand our partnerships in the area of creative arts education and wellness for our local youths.

We encourage former Master Artists and Associate Artists to become leaders and advocates for the arts.

We establish partnerships with research universities to develop quantitative benchmarks and metrics for the Arts & Wellness program.

We inspire those who inspire the world.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16.17

Average of 8.48 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.2

Average of 3.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 2% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$42,083 $402,907 $372,181 $561,679 -$629,542
As % of expenses -4.0% 38.5% 39.7% 47.7% -46.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$295,917 $144,442 $127,883 $304,831 -$880,307
As % of expenses -22.7% 11.1% 10.8% 21.3% -54.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,272,394 $1,176,130 $1,082,383 $1,435,655 $1,413,133
Total revenue, % change over prior year 117.4% -48.2% -8.0% 32.6% -1.6%
Program services revenue 12.2% 24.3% 19.5% 18.8% 19.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 37.4% 13.5% 16.2% 22.0% 10.7%
Government grants 6.7% 15.7% 34.6% 22.8% 17.7%
All other grants and contributions 42.6% 45.8% 38.6% 32.5% 47.0%
Other revenue 1.1% 0.7% -8.9% 3.8% 5.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,052,110 $1,047,098 $937,600 $1,176,757 $1,359,613
Total expenses, % change over prior year 5.9% -0.5% -10.5% 25.5% 15.5%
Personnel 37.5% 40.3% 49.5% 47.3% 48.2%
Professional fees 14.7% 10.2% 12.4% 12.3% 11.6%
Occupancy 4.9% 4.8% 4.6% 3.6% 4.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.3% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 42.9% 44.7% 33.5% 36.6% 36.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,305,944 $1,305,563 $1,181,898 $1,433,605 $1,610,378
One month of savings $87,676 $87,258 $78,133 $98,063 $113,301
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $152,222 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,393,620 $1,392,821 $1,260,031 $1,683,890 $1,723,679

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.7 1.9 3.5 1.6 2.2
Months of cash and investments 39.1 45.5 52.8 46.8 34.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -0.1 2.9 7.2 8.9 1.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $326,794 $166,898 $273,570 $153,848 $245,192
Investments $3,102,592 $3,807,114 $3,848,083 $4,435,931 $3,670,690
Receivables $436,377 $236,995 $181,672 $231,984 $201,380
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $10,033,947 $10,174,898 $10,389,048 $10,488,402 $10,554,142
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 56.6% 58.3% 59.5% 61.4% 63.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.6% 3.4% 3.3% 3.4% 3.0%
Unrestricted net assets $4,347,208 $4,491,650 $4,619,533 $4,924,364 $4,044,057
Temporarily restricted net assets $584,864 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $3,032,694 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $3,617,558 $3,722,718 $3,663,303 $3,701,487 $3,746,517
Total net assets $7,964,766 $8,214,368 $8,282,836 $8,625,851 $7,790,574

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Nancy Lowden Norman

Nancy has worked for Atlantic Center for the Arts since 1996 in the capacity of fundraising, special events, and public relations, assuming her role as Director of Advancement in 2007, Co-Executive Director in 2011, and Executive Director in 2017. She works with both individual donors/investors and corporate partners. Nancy completed the Certificate in Philanthropic Fundraising from Rollins College Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership Center, Winter Park, FL, and the Leadership Development Program at the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, NC in 2014. She received her MS in Mass Communication from San Diego State University, her BS in journalism from University of Florida, and is a member of the Florida Public Relations Association, Association of Fundraising Professionals and on the Board of the Volusia County Cultural Alliance.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Atlantic Center for the Arts, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/05/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Russell T. North

Northway Marketers

Term: 2024 - 2026

Doug McGinnis

Apriarist

Margery Pabst-Steinmetz

President, The Pabst Steinmetz Foundation

Gerard “J” Pendergast

Architect

Hiram Powell

Interim President , Bethune-Cookman University

Fred Raffa

Senior Economist, Raffa Consulting Economists

Mark Beckwith

Parallax Advertising

Roy Hester

Partner, Planned Furniture Promotions

Corey Brown

Storch Law Firm

Ivan Castro

Medical Practice

Jeff Moore

Dean, UCF College of Arts & Humanities

Russell North

President, Northway Marketers

Abbie Teague

Brown & Brown of Florida, Inc.

Kevin Haran

UCF School of Visual Arts and Design

John Jeronimo

Architect

Jo Sinclair

Artist

Ron Davoli

President & CEO Wharton-Smith, Inc.

Nancy Tallent

Senior Vice President, Reyes Beer Division, Reyes Holdings, LLC

Matthew Ahearn

Dean Mead Attorneys at Law

Ann Martorano

Chief Communications Officer, Halifax Health

Midge Wilson

PhD, Arts Advocate

Nekeshia Woods

Partner, Parkway Venture Capital

David Kosmas

Broker, Co-Owner, NSB Homes, Luxury Group & Coastal Lifestyle Experts

Kenneth Collier

President and Founder of Collier Consulting, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/5/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/21/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.