PLATINUM2023

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Uniting to Eradicate Sex Trafficking in the U.S. by 2030

Virginia Beach, VA   |  https://www.safehouseproject.org/

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SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

EIN: 82-3487081


Mission

Safe House Project unites communities to end domestic sex trafficking and restore hope, freedom, and a future to every survivor. Safe House Project’s mission is to increase survivor identification of sex trafficking beyond one percent through education, provide emergency services and placement to survivors, and ensure every survivor has access to safe housing and holistic care. We work toward this mission by preventing future trafficking through identification training, establishing a continuum of care for all survivors, and informing legislation to reduce demand, prosecute perpetrators, and protect survivors.

Ruling year info

2018

CEO

Kristi Wells

Chief Operations Officer

Brittany Dunn

Main address

1340 North Great Neck Road Suite 1272-162

Virginia Beach, VA 23454 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-3487081

Subject area info

Sexual assault victim services

Crime prevention

Child abuse

Sexual abuse

Child advocacy

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Ethnic and racial groups

At-risk youth

Victims and oppressed people

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (L01)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

When Safe House Project began in 2018: Hundreds of thousands of Americans will be trafficked this year, including an estimated 300,000 American children. 1% are rescued. 1,044 beds exist for survivors across the United States. There are less than 100 beds across the U.S. for child victims of sex trafficking. Due to the lack of safe houses, 80% of survivors end up back in the hands of their traffickers. Safe House Project’s mission is to increase survivor identification beyond one percent through education, provide emergency services and placement to survivors, and ensure every survivor has access to safe housing and holistic care by accelerating safe house capacity and development across America. Our vision is to unite communities to end domestic sex trafficking and restore hope, freedom, and a future to every survivor.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Safe House Capacity Building

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people are trafficked in the United States, many of whom are exploited through the commercial sex industry. Only one percent are ever identified, and without restorative care, 80% of identified survivors will be revictimized by the same or another trafficker. Unfortunately, this happens far too often due to a distinct lack of spaces in safe homes across the country.

Through the Safe House Capacity Building Program, Safe House Project mentors and funds new or expanding safe house programs to increase the capacity of safe housing and decrease the barriers to services for survivors. We understand that it is aftercare that ultimately breaks the cycle of victimization, and every survivor deserves a chance to heal in safety. So far, SHP has launched 478 new spaces in safe house programs across the country, which provide a total of 174K safe nights to exiting survivors every year, and provided programs with 16K hours of mentorship.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
At-risk youth
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities

Very little oversight and accountability for safe house programs exists in the United States, which leaves survivors vulnerable to further trauma and exploitation. It is vital for the growth of the anti-trafficking movement that programs are held to standards of care and provide high-quality services to survivors of sex trafficking.

Through Safe House Certification, Safe House Project evaluates residential programs serving trafficking survivors based on five criteria:
- Organizational Structure and Compliance
- Executive & Board Leadership
- Residential Programming
- Financial Sustainability
- Specialized Services Programming

This independent evaluation highlights opportunities for improved operations and enhanced effectiveness in serving survivors with evidence-based best practices. The purpose of a certification model is to provide standards or care based on best practices formed by lived experience experts, medical professionals, and other industry leaders.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Children and youth
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse

Even if they are physically able to leave trafficking, survivors face incredible barriers to accessing the support and resources they need to remain free from exploitation. Without services like this, 80% of identified survivors will be revictimized. Hundreds of thousands of survivors remain in sex trafficking every year in the United States due to these barriers to care.

To address this need, Safe House Project's Emergency Survivor Support Program assists survivors as they exit a trafficking situation and provides them with emergency services, safe house placement, and support to break the cycle of victimization and begin their path to freedom. These services include coordinating a survivor's exit plan, providing for their basic needs, navigating the safe house placement process, and scheduling transportation.

This program has grown to serve more than 750 survivors as of November 2023 and expects to serve 900 survivors in 2024.

Population(s) Served
Social and economic status
Health
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Victims of crime and abuse

The first step in combatting trafficking is identifying it in our communities. Unfortunately, fewer than one percent of all survivors of trafficking will ever be identified.

To raise identification rates of survivors and prevent future trafficking, Safe House Project's education initiatives train and equip individuals, including healthcare professionals, educators, law enforcement, in-home service providers, and community members to identify, report, and provide resources to survivors of human trafficking. Training courses are available at https://safehouseproject.org/training.

To date, more than 300,000 individuals have participated in our training and are equipped to recognize potential trafficking victims in their daily lives. As our education efforts have grown and our training courses have diversified over the last several years, we have seen the direct power of trained individuals to raise the identification rate for survivors of trafficking.

Population(s) Served

Safe House Project leads the Trafficking Survivor Equity Coalition, which brings survivor-informed and industry-informed policy recommendations to educate lawmakers on how to effectively prevent trafficking, protect trafficking survivors through equitable and inclusive services, and prosecute traffickers and buyers. Establishing accurate and effective legislation is key to successfully eradicating sex trafficking in the United States.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Health
Social and economic status
Adults
Children and youth
Health
Social and economic status

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Survivor Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Survivor Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe House Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of nights of safe housing provided to survivors of human trafficking

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe House Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Identification Training & Prevention Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe House Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Identification Training & Prevention Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients placed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Survivor Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe House Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Survivor Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizations signing onto policy guidelines or proposals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe House Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Ending Child Trafficking by 2030.

Safe House Project launched in 2017 because at that time Health & Human Services estimated 300K American kids are trafficked every year in the United States, yet victim identification was only at 1%. Furthermore, even when victims were being identified over 80% were being re-victimized due to a lack of safe house programs that offer restorative care services, like therapy, medical attention, education, life skills training, and support. From these realizations our mission was born to increase survivor identification beyond one percent through training, provide emergency services and placement to survivors, and ensure every survivor has access to safe housing.

To increase survivor identification above 1% we have worked to educate people through survivor-written trainings that empower them to spot, report, and prevent trafficking where they live, work, and play. To date we have trained over 250K people, which drove the development of our second program: Emergency Support & Safe House Placement. As survivors are exiting their trafficking situation, they need immediate assistance to understand the services available to them, and help navigating those first days of safety. Our Survivor Response team is on-call 24/7 to support survivors and get them into a safe house. To date we have had the privilege of walking alongside over 300 trafficking survivors and their children as they step into freedom. Finally, we are increasing capacity of certified safe house programs to help provide emergency, long-term, and transitional support to survivors on their healing journey. To date, we have helped add 371 new beds in safe house programs, which provide over 135K safe nights annually.

1) Accelerate Domestic Shelter Capacity and Standards | The #1 Need in the Continuum of Care
Seed & Launch: Launch Partner Grants for Children and Over-18 Shelters
Sustainable Operations: Mentorship Grants to Secure Local Support and Resources
Increase National Capacity year-over-year
Collaborative Growth, System Solutions, and National Best Practices

2) Grow National Network of Resources | Stewarding National Care into Local Impact
Property Acquisitions, Homes, and Renovations
Corporate and Community Engagement
Connecting Professional Services and Shelter / Survivor Necessities

3) Empower a Lifetime of Freedom | Long-term Survivor Health and Independence
Post-Shelter Communities that Empower Self-Determination and Reduce Recidivism
Workforce Readiness: Survivor Population and Trauma-Informed Workplaces

4) Advance Innovative Education and Prevention | Actions that Promote Counter-Trafficking Impact
Education, National Campaigns, Technology

The Safe House Project...
- Has an expansive network of connections around the United States.
- Is a scalable model that allows anyone, anywhere to get involved.
- Is an organization without walls, which means lower overhead, and more money going directly to survivors of sex trafficking.
- Provides various fundraising opportunities for different audiences, sizes, and locations to allow everyone to get involved with the effort to eradicate sex trafficking in the United States.
- Educates people on the global crisis of sex trafficking through online media, youth empowerment programs, and other events.
- An extensive partnership network amongst local anti-sex trafficking organizations, government agencies, and private/corporate donors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Sample Size

Financials

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

81.91

Average of 351.97 over 5 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

21.5

Average of 12.1 over 5 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7%

Average of 15% over 5 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $256,366 -$57,396 $206,639 $1,189,894
As % of expenses 139.5% -15.3% 28.9% 125.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $256,366 -$57,396 $206,639 $1,189,894
As % of expenses 139.5% -15.3% 28.9% 125.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $440,118 $317,595 $921,430 $2,209,400
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% -27.8% 190.1% 139.8%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 5.9% 2.8% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.4% 94.1% 96.9% 99.1%
Other revenue 0.4% -0.1% 0.3% 0.9%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $183,752 $374,991 $714,791 $945,194
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 104.1% 90.6% 32.2%
Personnel 32.6% 36.6% 30.5% 30.8%
Professional fees 0.1% 0.0% 2.2% 0.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 40.8% 54.6% 48.4% 39.4%
All other expenses 26.5% 8.6% 18.6% 29.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $183,752 $374,991 $714,791 $945,194
One month of savings $15,313 $31,249 $59,566 $78,766
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $199,065 $406,240 $774,357 $1,023,960

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 22.0 8.9 7.8 21.5
Months of cash and investments 22.0 8.9 7.8 21.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 21.9 8.9 8.1 21.3
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $336,396 $279,625 $467,031 $1,695,720
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $18,714 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.2% 0.4% 0.1% 1.2%
Unrestricted net assets $335,880 $278,484 $485,123 $1,675,017
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $335,880 $278,484 $485,123 $1,675,017

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Kristi Wells

Kristi Wells is a leading expert in the fight against human trafficking in the United States. Kristi co-founded Safe House Project, a non-profit organization combatting trafficking in America, in 2017. She was inspired to take action after understanding the high volume of this criminal activity in the United States, juxtaposed with the lack of safe and supportive housing options for those who have experienced trafficking. Under Kristi's leadership, Safe House Project has quickly become a unifying leader in the anti-trafficking field. The organization has raised millions of dollars, which have allowed them to support the launch of new safe homes across America for trafficking survivors to find healing, help hundreds of victims escape their traffickers and find placement into these safe homes, and train hundreds of thousands of individuals, corporations, medical professionals, law enforcement and military in communities across America to spot, report and prevent trafficking.

Chief Operations Officer

Brittany Dunn

Brittany Dunn is COO & Co-Founder of Safe House Project. Brittany served as a member of the Virginia Governor's Commission on Human Trafficking Prevention and Survivor Support. Prior to Safe House Project, Brittany spent 10 years in International Business Development at CareerBuilder.com. Brittany Dunn has a B.A. in Economics and English from Wellesley College. She graduated top of her class with an MBA from Thunderbird School of Global Management. She is a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, Pi Sigma Alpha, Wellesley Alumnae Association, the Naval Officers' Spouses Club, and is an active member in her church. Brittany has been featured in The Hill, CBN Interactive, The Pilot, & Missouri Physicians Magazine. Brittany has trained law enforcement, healthcare professionals, policymakers, and corporations on the issue of human trafficking in the United States. She is a military spouse, mother of two, lifelong learner, world traveler, and protector of the vulnerable.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

SAFE HOUSE PROJECT INC

Board of directors
as of 01/14/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

RaeAnn Hancock

Safe House Project

Term: 2023 -

Kenneth D Walker

Chairman and CEO Driven Brands, Inc. Chairman

Kristi Wells

CEO, Safe House Project

Joel English

Vice President, Centura College

Darin Ely

President, Virginia Asset Group

Vickie Walker

Investor

Nigel Anderson

Board Member Emeritus

RaeAnn Hancock

NTT DATA Services

Derik Timmerman

Managing Partner of Sparrow Nonprofit Solutions

Sarah Navarre

Partner at The Martin Navarre Wealth Management Group of Wells Fargo Advisors

Allison Bollinger

Vice President of Emergency and Urgent Care Services, Ascension

Scott Hasenbalg

Social Entrepreneur & Executive Leader

John Allen Waldrop

Waldrop & Colvin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/8/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/31/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.