PLATINUM2023

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Feeding People Nourishing Lives

Fort Myers, FL   |  www.communitycooperative.com
GuideStar Charity Check

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

EIN: 59-2602772


Mission

The mission of CCI is to eliminate hunger and homelessness in Lee County while simultaneously inspiring and supporting sustained positive change in its clients by delivering innovative food, education and social service programs.

Ruling year info

1985

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Stefanie Ink-Edwards

Main address

PO Box 2143

Fort Myers, FL 33902 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc.

EIN

59-2602772

Subject area info

Human services

Food aid

Food banks

Food delivery

Homeless services

Population served info

Children and youth

Infants and toddlers

Adults

Seniors

Economically disadvantaged people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Meals on Wheels (K36)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CCI addresses hunger and homelessness in southwest Florida with food, social and education services to achieve long-term solutions. Hunger and affordable housing continue to be issues in southwest Florida, as well as long-term effects of Hurricane Ian. We provide food, direct assistance, case management and referrals addressing root causes of hunger. Our organization assists individuals and families with meeting basic needs and then setting goals that will lead them to sustainable solutions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Cafe, Community Market, and Mobile Food Pantry Program

The Community Market is located in Fort Myers and provides households in crisis an opportunity to acquire emergency supplemental groceries for their family. In addition, clients agree to complete an intake with a case coach to assess for additional services that address root causes of hunger in order to regain self sufficiency and long-term success. The market approach now assists people during crisis while also cutting down on food waste, improving our use of resources and empowering people with a sense of dignity and choice.

Community Cafes are located in Fort Myers and Fort Myers Beach. The site in Fort Myers, formerly known as the Soup Kitchen, has served the hungry and homeless since 1984. We provide healthy meals to those experiencing or facing homelessness served in a compassionate environment while connecting clients to case coaches, education classes, homeless outreach, and other services and referrals. Cafe Education opportunities include financial literacy, health, and wellness, and employment classes. Connection and assessment for other services and referrals for contributing causes of hunger such as mental health, substance abuse, medical issues and other matters are available.

The Mobile Pantry Program provides food and connections to services to food insecure and underserved neighborhoods throughout Lee County. In 2017, ten different mobile sites were provided services. The mobile pantries increase access to services and fresh food for households residing in more isolated areas and increase our capacity to reach more people in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Meals On Wheels Program delivers one hot, nutritious meal six days a week, with an extra meal for Sunday to Lee County residents who are elderly, ill, or disabled and are unable to shop or prepare their own food. This service prepares and delivers meals to homes by a team of over 200 volunteer drivers and kitchen help, providing daily nutrition and contact for homebound residents, thus preserving the independence and preventing isolation of our customers while being cost effective for our community. Additional connections to social services and Case Coach assessment is available by referral. In 2017, 660 seniors were provided food and services. Additional services such as Case Coach follow up for social services, supplemental grocery program for the lowest income clients, and pet food delivery for those clients with companion pets are also provided to Meals On Wheels clients.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with disabilities

CCI provides social services, case coaching, and referrals for households experiencing or facing hunger and homelessness. We partner with Lee County School District to directly reach at-risk children and their caregivers. We partner with other community organizations and the United Way to offer comprehensive and unduplicated services. We provided over 7,000 clients with services in 2017.

Homeless Outreach provides services to the more chronic homeless. Services including ACCESS for Medicaid and Food Stamp Applications, serve as a general mail delivery site for homeless individuals, offer social services and education opportunities, replace picture identification, provide hygiene items, blankets and more.

Cafe Education works with the Social Services Team to provide opportunities for adults to learn employment and financial skills, self-development and goal setting and to engage in a variety of other classes on health and wellness topics that offer individuals an opportunity to gain the tools and knowledge to move forward and achieve positive life change.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Growing Healthy Kids provides food and services directly to children and their caregivers through supplemental groceries at mobile food pantries and school programs providing healthy snacks and education. Food Literacy In Preschool provides education about healthy eating and provides a healthy snack using a piece of fresh produce.

Without supplemental food, many children would not get the nutrition they need to thrive. Experts agree that good nutrition during childhood is critical to a child's ability to learn. When children miss out on eating key food groups, they are deprived of essential nutrients needed for optimal cognitive functioning. We feed the brain so the brain is ready to learn come Monday morning.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Infants and toddlers

Food Outreach implements food rescue to reduce food waste which has become an epidemic in our communities. In the U.S. alone, about 40 percent of all edible food goes to waste equating to a $165 billion a year loss according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). This fact is inexcusable considering that 50 million Americans are currently classified as food insecure. CCI's Food Rescue Program partners with smaller food producers, restaurants, and caterers who have perishable and prepared food that would otherwise end up in a landfill and use this food to feed the hungry. Food Rescue saves money, increases access to fresh food for low income families, cuts down on waste and lessens the footprint Lee County leaves on our environment.

Our Able Garden provides a sustainable fresh food source for all our emergency food programs. Fresh fruits and vegetables are used as ingredients in meals or additions to supplemental groceries. The garden also provides a great volunteer opportunity for clients and community members to become involved in giving back.

CCI partners with local growers and urban gardens to increase access to and provide more fresh produce in low-income neighborhoods resulting in healthy people, healthy environments, and healthy economies.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Social Services, Homeless Outreach & Cafe Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed/maintained healthy eating habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Growing Healthy Kids & Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our Food Literacy In Preschool teaches healthy eating habits. In 2021, due to the pandemic, classes were temporarily suspended. Classes resumed in 2022.

Number of adults over age 65 with a source of ongoing care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Meals On Wheels

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric tracks adults over the age of 62. Numbers in 2020 significantly increased due to the impact of COVID-19 on seniors.

Number of snacks served for students participating in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Growing Healthy Kids & Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Food Literacy In Preschool was suspended in 2020 due to safety concerns from COVID-19. Classes resumed in 2022.

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes all food units from all food programs. Numbers evened out in 2021 as the economy returned to normal since the pandemic.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Social Services, Homeless Outreach & Cafe Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

44 families were served by our Building Stronger Families program in 2021. Fewer families were served in 2021 due to the additional government stimulus funding available to families.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We serve meals to food-insecure individuals at Sam's Community Cafe & Kitchen and for homebound, food-insecure seniors through Meals on Wheels.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCI's goal is to end hunger in Lee County by providing emergency food to those in need during crisis and then empowering customers with the tools and resources for making positive change resulting in long-term solutions to hunger.

Our agency will provide a broad variety of food delivery systems in order to overcome barriers to food access and availability. These programs will specifically target high-risk groups including seniors, children, working poor, unemployed, and the chronic homeless.

Moreover, CCI will deepen the integration of broad social services and education opportunities into the food delivery systems.

As an organization we will strengthen organizational capacity to support the strategic plan and future growth in order to remain a sustainable agency for those in southwest Florida.

Our strategies for achieving agency goals include tailoring emergency food programs to meet the needs of different vulnerable populations such as children, seniors, families, unemployed, and working poor and then connecting these individuals to additional services addressing root causes. We will help clients set goals that will bring them closer to achieving family and financial stability and long-term success.

The following objectives have been set as a strategy for achieving success:
~80% of Meals On Wheels clients will report improved quality of life due to the program's home-delivered meals and additional services.
~75% of Food Literacy In Preschool students will report a better understanding of healthy eating choices
~At least 70% of Sam's Cafe & Kitchen clients will state they feel less hungry due to cafe meals.
~80% of families report feeling more food secure due to supplemental food from the Community Market
~80% of families report increased access to fresh food due to the Mobile Pantries.
~80% of families report feeling more food secure due to supplemental food from mobile pantries.
~80% of families report that the food from school mobile pantries helps their child be more prepared to learn at school.
~70% of Building Stronger Families/Case Management clients will achieve financial goals leading to self-sufficiency.
~70% of Building Stronger Families/Case Management clients will achieve their goal of food stability.

Community Cooperative has been in existence in Lee County since 1984 and incorporated as a 501(c)3 in 1985. We began serving meals to the homeless as the Fort Myers Soup Kitchen and expanded to become
Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc. (CCMI) in 2006. CCMI included Meals On Wheels, the Community Cafe & Market, and Social Services. In 2014 we changed our name to Community Cooperative, Inc. with the
tagline "Feeding People, Nourishing Lives". The name change illustrates refocused effort on providing healthy, nutritious food and connections to services that address root causes of homelessness. We created a
strong network of community partners including businesses, faith-based organizations, service providers, government agencies and individuals with a unified mission of improving the quality of life of vulnerable
populations.

Our Social Workers provided 37,182 social services and referrals in 2023. Our cafe served 25,055 meals, our market provided groceries to 7,225 households, mobile pantries served 40,089 emergency groceries to individuals & Meals On Wheels delivered 113,412 meals to seniors.

We will continue to work toward meeting the hunger need and monitor progress according to how programs are meeting their objectives.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

43.20

Average of 12.73 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.2

Average of 2.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13%

Average of 14% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $365,329 $491,305 $1,587,354 $1,034,088 $765,191
As % of expenses 12.0% 15.2% 33.7% 28.1% 17.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $259,323 $364,742 $1,429,827 $856,777 $583,611
As % of expenses 8.3% 10.9% 29.4% 22.2% 12.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,418,312 $3,829,582 $6,436,192 $4,780,992 $5,994,211
Total revenue, % change over prior year -0.3% 12.0% 68.1% -25.7% 25.4%
Program services revenue 8.6% 11.9% 7.1% 9.1% 9.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.5% 0.6%
Government grants 4.3% 3.4% 12.6% 4.1% 2.5%
All other grants and contributions 86.9% 84.0% 79.5% 85.1% 88.3%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.4% 0.6% 1.1% -0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,033,713 $3,230,194 $4,710,350 $3,674,905 $4,419,859
Total expenses, % change over prior year -2.1% 6.5% 45.8% -22.0% 20.3%
Personnel 37.8% 38.4% 27.4% 35.2% 32.0%
Professional fees 1.0% 0.8% 0.8% 1.1% 1.1%
Occupancy 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 1.6% 1.8% 2.1% 6.9%
All other expenses 60.9% 58.8% 69.8% 61.3% 59.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,139,719 $3,356,757 $4,867,877 $3,852,216 $4,601,439
One month of savings $252,809 $269,183 $392,529 $306,242 $368,322
Debt principal payment $0 $26,354 $27,402 $28,317 $0
Fixed asset additions $185,627 $515,899 $175,110 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $3,578,155 $4,168,193 $5,462,918 $4,186,775 $4,969,761

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.4 1.3 4.4 8.4 8.2
Months of cash and investments 2.9 3.2 5.9 10.8 12.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.5 2.2 5.1 9.6 9.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $359,135 $356,887 $1,724,398 $2,573,484 $3,025,719
Investments $374,679 $494,426 $586,525 $727,409 $1,660,366
Receivables $65,062 $102,513 $89,168 $122,855 $162,077
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,690,526 $2,141,300 $2,260,986 $2,334,918 $2,409,107
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 49.4% 41.9% 44.2% 49.6% 54.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 9.0% 8.6% 4.3% 1.4% 1.8%
Unrestricted net assets $1,476,644 $1,841,386 $3,271,213 $4,127,990 $4,711,601
Temporarily restricted net assets $30,573 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $112,761 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $143,334 $251,465 $408,805 $500,109 $1,219,380
Total net assets $1,619,978 $2,092,851 $3,680,018 $4,628,099 $5,930,981

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Stefanie Ink-Edwards

Chief Executive Officer- Community Cooperative, Inc. 2021-Present Chief Development and Operations Officer- Community Cooperative, Inc. 2014-2021 Leadership, management of multiple teams, strategic planning, operational oversight, budgeting, coordination and priority setting for engagement and retention and relationship building of current and prospective fund holders. Development, management and execution of all marketing and public relations. Grant management, special event management and oversight of volunteer programs and campus projects. Founder and Vice President- South Florida Mud Run 2011-2016 Created and managed a non-profit organization focused on raising funds to support local charities. Operational management, fiscal oversight, marketing, event management and volunteer management. Financial Advisor- Alliance Financial Group 2008-2014 Financial planning and advancement of asset performance for managed clients, maximizing efficiency in cash flows, proper protections and retir

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE, INC

Board of directors
as of 01/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Keith Banasiak,

Waste Pro

Term: 2017 - 2024

Steve Shimp

Honorary Lifetime Member

Wayne Kirkwood

Honorary Lifetime Member

John Klaas

Honorary Lifetime Member

Sybil Edgar

Honorary Lifetime Member

Helen Fallert

Honorary Lifetime Member

Richard Grady

Honorary Lifetime Member

Christine Larson

Honorary Lifetime Member

John McGee

Honorary Lifetime Member

Sam Galloway

Founder & Honorary Lifetime Member

Keith Banasiak

Waste Pro

Charlotte Miller

FPL

Ty Roland

Aloia, Roland, Lubell, PLLC

Ryan VanHorn

Custome Packing & Products, Inc.

Ryan Carter

Scottlynn Transport, LLC

Noelle Branning

Director, Lee County Tax Collector

Robert Galloway

Sam Galloway Ford-Lincoln

Julie Klein

CRS Technology Consultants

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.