PLATINUM2024

International Institute of Los Angeles

Over a Century of Service for Citizens of the World

aka IILA   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  https://www.iilosangeles.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

International Institute of Los Angeles

EIN: 95-1641446


Mission

Founded in 1914 to help newly-arrived immigrants integrate into their new lives in Los Angeles, the International Institute of Los Angeles provides assistance to refugees and immigrants securing their first job, getting legal help, or finding child care providers so they can work outside the home. At IILA, our mission is to help families become self-sufficient and to promote cross-cultural understanding. For over a century, IILA has empowered hundreds of thousands of immigrants, refugees, and survivors of human trafficking with skills, abilities, and resources to successfully start new lives in Southern California.

Ruling year info

1939

President and CEO

Cambria Tortorelli

Main address

3845 Selig Place

Los Angeles, CA 90031 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

95-1641446

Subject area info

Community service

Social rights

Human services

Family services

Population served info

Infants and toddlers

Families

Parents

Immigrants and migrants

Victims and oppressed people

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

International Institute of Los Angeles provides refugees, immigrants, and survivors of human trafficking with the skills, abilities, and resources they need to become self-sufficient and start their new lives in Southern California. When newly-arrived individuals are able to secure their first jobs, get legal help, and find child care that works for their families, they are able to fully participate in and contribute to our communities. Our dedicated staff provides a wide range of social, legal, and child care services to support the most critical needs of our communities. With a special focus on assisting limited-English proficient and low-income individuals, our staff provides free or low-cost child care, transportation to critical services, nutrition, reuniting and strengthening families, legal assistance, help navigating federal immigration policies and procedures, resettlement of refugees and asylum applicants, among other services for immigrants and refugees.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Local Integration & Family Empowerment (LIFE) Division - Immigrant & Refugee Services

RECEPTION & PLACEMENT
Comprehensive resettlement services for qualifying refugees who have local family and friends (US ties)

MATCHING GRANT
Specialized case management for accelerated employment for qualifying new arrivals

SURVIVORS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
In depth and trauma-informed case management for survivors and their families

FIRST 5 REFUGEE FAMILY SUPPORT
Case managements and funding for refugees, SIVs, or humanitarian parolees from any country in LA County with children 0-5 or a pregnant member

AFGHAN HEALTH PROMOTION
Help accessing health care, scheduling appointments, arranging transportation and more for qualifying Afghans

AFGHAN INTEGRATION & RESETTLEMENT SERVICES
Case management services for qualifying Afghans who currently live in LA or Orange counties

OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH
Services to unaccompanied minors that support reunification and aide integration

PREFERRED COMMUNITIES
Extended case management for vulnerable populations to aide acclamation and integration

Population(s) Served
Refugees and displaced people
Asylum seekers
Victims and oppressed people

Through our childcare centers and subsidized programs, the Child Development Division (CDD) provides the flexibility vital for parents working nontraditional hours, looking for a job, going to school, or looking for housing.

CHILD CARE SUBSIDY
Administers child care through voucher-based programs for low income families. Reimburses the cost of child care for children up to 13 yrs for low-income families through CalWORKS Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3, or AP Program.

FAMILY CHILD CARE HOME EDUCATION NETWORK
Subsidized in-home child care for eligible families and ongoing professional development for caregivers through partner organization FCCHEN

PRESCHOOL & EDUCATIONAL NETWORK
Provides free or low-cost preschool education for children 2-5 years old. Part-day and full-day programs prepare children for success by providing high quality childcare and education using the high scope curriculum, which is based on active learning and a child’s positive interactions with adults and peers.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Children and youth
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

ADULT REMOVAL DEFENSE
Full representation for immigrants facing a removal hearing in Immigration Court for those seeking asylum, cancellation of removal, or other remedies

UNACCOMPANIED MINORS
Representation for unaccompanied minors seeking asylum before the USCIS, or in Immigration Court and those same clients seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJS) orders in either Family Court or Probate Court

IMMIGRATION DETENTION
Free assistance with bond and detention cases

AFGHAN LEGAL REPRESENTATION PROJECT
Assistance with asylum applications, family petitions, assistance with SIV applications, TPS applications and other forms of immigration relief for Afghan humanitarian parolees, SIV applicants, asylum seekers and asylees

IILA provides a full range of other immigration services. We represent a limited number of these cases free-of-charge and may charge low-cost community prices for applicants who do not qualify for our free services.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Victims and oppressed people
Children and youth
Detainees
Family relationships

METRO’S LOW-INCOME FARE IS EASY (LIFE)
Enrollment assistance for low-income individuals in LA County for LA Metro fare subsidies and several transit agencies or free regional ride options

TRANSITIONAL SUBSIDIZED EMPLOYMENT
Subsidized job opportunities for CalWORKs participants. Clients are assigned to public agencies or non-profits where they gain paid work experience and on-the-job training.

TELECOMMUNICATION EDUCATION ASSISTANCE IN MULTIPLE-LANGUAGES (TEAM)
Free services for those not proficient in English to assist with questions, concerns, or to resolve phone bill complaints or fraud disputes.

COMMUNITY HELP & AWARENESS OF NATURAL GAS & ELECTRICITY SERVICES
Free service for those not proficient in English to assist with questions, concerns, or to resolve gas and electric bill issues and complaints.

COUNTY COMMUNITY EQUITY FUND
Case management to any person or family to reduce the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 in communities where health disparities from COVID-19 persist.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Unemployed people
Low-income people
Working poor
Immigrants and migrants

IILA's Nutrition Division provides child care programs across Los Angeles with healthy meals for children to set them up for a lifetime of health and success. By instilling healthy eating habits from an early age, we can significantly increase children’s chances of avoiding many health issues later in life. Furthermore, optimal health and nutrition can help low-income and underserved children close the achievement gap through better performance at school and in life.

We serve meals “family style,” an approach affirmed by experts as the ideal way to help young ones develop social skills that will assist them throughout their lives.

IILA serves hot meals that we cook from scratch. Our on-site state-of-the-art commercial kitchen prepares one million freshly-cooked breakfasts, lunches, and snacks each year to child care programs across L.A. By modeling healthy practices and making mealtimes enjoyable and social, we can lay the groundwork for a lifetime of healthy habits.

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers
Families
Parents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition for Outstanding Committment to the South Coast Communities 2009

United States House of Representatives

Certificate of Recognition for 92 Years of Service and Dedication to the City of Los Angeles 2007

City of Los Angeles

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Development Division

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Immigration Legal Services Division

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Local Integration & Family Empowerment (LIFE) Division - Social Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

While much of our funding comes from an array of government contracts, IILA is seeking private support to raise unrestricted donations that provide us with the flexibility to address the problems facing newly-arrived immigrants and low-income families.

Private support will allow our staff to serve more clients, expand our reach, and implement new programs to meet the urgent and ever-changing needs of our communities.

IILA seeks to help our most vulnerable community members overcome the obstacles they face so that they may thrive, find justice and equity, care for their families, and become contributing members of society.

International Institute of Los Angeles (IILA) provides comprehensive services to immigrants, refugees and asylees through our Reception & Placement, Human Trafficking and Family Strengthening programs. We link these groups with local families or friends who work with us to find them housing and secure their first job here in the United States.

We also provide free or low cost preschool education for children. We prepare children for school readiness and success in life by providing early education and high quality services using the High Scope curriculum. We also have a commercial kitchen that prepares and delivers one million cooked breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks to various child care programs throughout Los Angeles County.

The Institute employs over 130 dedicated, multicultural staff providing child care, transportation, immigration legal assistance, nutrition and refugee services in over 25 centers and offices throughout Southern California.

Founded in 1914, as a branch of the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association), the International Institute of Los Angeles aimed to help immigrant women adapt to life in the United States. The Institute offered a place for immigrants to gather for special events and holidays in the courtyard (pictured here in 1932) to foster greater cross-cultural understanding.

For over a century IILA has offered a wide range of services to assist limited-English proficient and low-income individuals achieve self-sufficiency. In the 1960s, offerings were expanded to include a wide array of legal assistance, resettlement of refugees and asylum applicants, survivors of human trafficking, and free or low-cost child care and transportation.

1900s
Established by the YWCA to serve women and girls coming from Europe and Asia

1930s
During the Depression, IILA provided relief to immigrant communities through the Family Welfare Association

1940s
Opposed forced relocation and helped more than 1,500 Japanese Americans submit applications for certificates of identity and developed programs for education and social services in the Japanese relocation camps
After World War II helped resettle Soviet refugees under the Displaced Persons Act

1950s
Resettled refugees who came to Los Angeles fleeing the Cuban Revolution

1970s
Senior Services program, funded by the California State Office on Aging, provided nutritious meals, social service information, referral and socialization for seniors in East Los Angeles
Began resettlement of South East Asian refugees in 1975

1990s
Launched Immediate Needs Transportation program in wake of 1992 civil unrest
Central Valley offices were opened to provide refugee services to newly arriving Hmong refugees from Laos

2000s
Opened Adult Respite Care Program
Purchased commercial kitchen for child nutrition and adjoining two-flat residence for refugees
Began Refugee Employment services in Glendale office–currently home to six refugee programs
Built a commercial kitchen at Selig corporate office to provide meals to increased number of children
Launched Post Placement program to assist undocumented foster children
Began Victims of Trafficking program through US Committee for Refugees & Immigrants

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.08

Average of 2.39 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.2

Average of 2.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

29%

Average of 33% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

International Institute of Los Angeles

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

International Institute of Los Angeles

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

International Institute of Los Angeles

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of International Institute of Los Angeles’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$39,564 -$76,298 -$20,870 -$362,510 $2,081,066
As % of expenses -0.3% -0.5% -0.1% -2.5% 11.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$135,251 -$175,498 -$116,565 -$431,728 $2,032,556
As % of expenses -0.9% -1.2% -0.8% -2.9% 10.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $15,155,632 $14,669,221 $14,456,488 $14,413,283 $21,718,932
Total revenue, % change over prior year -2.5% -3.2% -1.5% -0.3% 50.7%
Program services revenue 8.7% 9.5% 10.9% 5.2% 6.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.4% 0.4% 0.8% 2.2% 9.3%
Government grants 88.8% 88.4% 87.4% 88.8% 77.4%
All other grants and contributions 1.3% 1.0% 0.3% 0.8% 4.6%
Other revenue 0.8% 0.7% 0.6% 3.0% 1.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $15,216,456 $14,763,267 $14,483,236 $14,780,946 $18,583,565
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.2% -3.0% -1.9% 2.1% 25.7%
Personnel 39.2% 42.5% 41.2% 40.1% 44.8%
Professional fees 0.3% 0.4% 0.9% 1.4% 1.4%
Occupancy 0.6% 0.6% 0.8% 0.6% 0.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.5% 1.7%
All other expenses 59.9% 56.5% 57.1% 57.3% 51.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $15,312,143 $14,862,467 $14,578,931 $14,850,164 $18,632,075
One month of savings $1,268,038 $1,230,272 $1,206,936 $1,231,746 $1,548,630
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $856,565
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $204,081
Total full costs (estimated) $16,580,181 $16,092,739 $15,785,867 $16,081,910 $21,241,351

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.0 3.0 4.5 3.9 2.2
Months of cash and investments 4.1 4.2 5.8 5.4 4.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.4 3.5 4.2 3.8 3.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $3,805,593 $3,749,788 $5,485,122 $4,766,479 $3,414,789
Investments $1,357,262 $1,374,364 $1,522,945 $1,841,115 $2,751,471
Receivables $1,089,408 $1,098,653 $733,508 $1,626,763 $2,823,727
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,018,581 $3,046,104 $3,109,154 $3,063,064 $2,211,441
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 66.0% 68.6% 70.3% 74.2% 57.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 26.7% 28.0% 41.9% 49.3% 29.5%
Unrestricted net assets $5,378,090 $5,202,592 $5,086,027 $4,654,299 $6,686,855
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $396,094
Total net assets $5,378,090 $5,202,592 $5,086,027 $4,654,299 $7,082,949

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and CEO

Cambria Tortorelli

Cambria Tortorelli has had a career in nonprofits spanning more than 27 years, including 15 years in nonprofit leadership. Before joining IILA in May 2021, she previously worked as the Parish Life Director at Holy Family Church in South Pasadena for 13 years, where she was the first lay person to lead the parish. Prior to Holy Family, Cambria served for two years as the President/CEO at Valley Interfaith Council and for 12 years at the Volunteer Center of Los Angeles, where she was Assistant Executive Director. Cambria has extensive experience in building interagency collaborations, securing and managing government contracts, fundraising, and public relations. Cambria has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Language and Literature from Somerville College, Oxford University, and a Master of Arts degree in Religious Studies from Mount St. Mary’s University in Los Angeles.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

International Institute of Los Angeles

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

International Institute of Los Angeles

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

International Institute of Los Angeles

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Stephen Holt

Stephen James Holt

Wilson Tang

John D. O'Malley

Louis A. Gordon

Thomas Lenz

Sharon Yen

Pritha Gupta

MD

Angela Efros

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/16/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.