GOLD2023

The National Humane Education Society Parent

The National Humane Education Society (NHES) is a private, nonprofit animal welfare organization with a central mission to foster a sentiment of kindness to animals in children and adults.

aka NHES   |   Charles Town, WV   |  http://www.nhes.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The National Humane Education Society

EIN: 54-0618244


Mission

In 1948, in response to our Nation’s constant killing of stray and abandoned companion animals, Mrs. Anna C. Briggs founded The National Humane Education Society (NHES) as a private, nonprofit animal welfare organization with a central mission “to foster a sentiment of kindness to animals in children and adults…” This mission stemmed from Mrs. Briggs’ philosophical belief system that “Animals have intrinsic value in and of themselves and are deserving of our protection.” Now, more than seventy years after its founding, without financial assistance from local, state, or federal governments, NHES continues to grow and to decrease animal suffering through its humane education & advocacy and animal care programs.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Mr. James D. Taylor

Main address

3731 Berryville Pike

Charles Town, WV 25414 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-0618244

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Population served info

Adults

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As a society, we kill an estimated 9,000 companion animals each day in our nation due primarily to irresponsible pet ownership that can be traced, in large part, to a lack of humane education; only 12 states require that some form of humane education be taught in their public schools. At NHES, we focus on humane education for both adults and children to help achieve a reduction in suffering.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Humane Education & Advocacy Program

The Humane Education & Advocacy Program serves to educate children and adults about proper animal stewardship through (1) creating and providing humane education presentations and programs; (2) providing informational services to supporters and the general public; (3) networking with other humane organizations; (4) creating and distributing humane education materials, both nationally and internationally; (5) creating, maintaining, and disseminating relevant information on the NHES website, social networking sites, and e-mail newsletters; and (6) advocating for animals by encouraging a multitude of private companies, law enforcement, regulatory agencies, and lawmakers—nationally and internationally—to adopt policies and laws that encompass the humane treatment of animals.
In 1954, Alice Morgan Wright, NHES board member and benefactress, wrote of NHES, “In 1948 we incorporated, a small group of us, to carry on what we think is one of the urgent needs of our time, Humane Education.” Today, the urgent need for humane education is still with us, and the NHES Humane Education & Advocacy Program is doing its part to meet this need—to provide humane education and create a more humane world.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Briggs Animal Adoption Center (BAAC) located on the NHES Campus is a truly special place. As NHES' flagship animal care facility--BAAC is a place of healing and learning--a haven where many a neglected or abused animal has come to know their first gentle touch from a human hand. It is a place where the visiting public can come an see a reverence for animal life and learn all they care to learn about proper animal stewardship.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Spay Today provides reduced-cost spay/neuter services through a network of participating veterinarians for people who understand the need to have their companion animal(s) spayed/neutered but who lack the financial resources to pay the normative fees that are charged for these services.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Rather than trying to do everything alone, NHES believes in the power of working with other reputable nonprofits to achieve an optimum reduction in animal suffering. To do so, NHES works cooperatively with and provides funding to select humane organizations whose work embodies the successful implementation of one of NHES' 12 Guiding Principles. Over the years, NHES has partnered with organizations in such states as Florida, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina and Delaware.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Top Rated 2021

Great Nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Professional Humane Educators 2022

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NHES seeks to foster a sentiment of kindness to animals by working to achieve an optimum reduction in animal suffering each year—based on available resources—and we accomplish this through our program services/goals:

1. Increasing NHES' Humane Education & Advocacy activities.
In 1954, Alice Morgan Wright, NHES board member, wrote of NHES' founding, “In 1948, we incorporated, a small group of us, to carry on what we think is one of the urgent needs of our time, Humane Education." Today, at NHES, this urgent need is still with us.

As a society, we kill an estimated 9,000 companion animals each day in our nation due primarily to irresponsible pet ownership that can be traced, in large part, to a lack of humane education; only 12 states require that some form of humane education be taught in their public schools. At NHES, we focus on humane education for both adults and children to help achieve a reduction in suffering.

2. Increasing the number of reduced-cost spay/neuter procedures provided by Spay Today.

Each year, thousands of companion animals remain unaltered and contribute to the already epidemic overpopulation and ensuing euthanasia of unwanted animals in our nation because their human companions cannot afford the normative fees charged by veterinarians to have their animals spayed or neutered. At NHES, we focus on increasing the number of spay/neuter procedures provided each year through our Spay Today program to help achieve a reduction in suffering.

3. Providing comprehensive rescue, rehabilitative and adoption services for animals that focus on quality first at NHES' flagship animal care facility, The Briggs Animal Adoption Center (BAAC).

Since its founding, NHES has consistently emphasized quality over quantity as part of the humane solution to achieving an optimum reduction in animal suffering. Simply put, BAAC believes a greater reduction in animal suffering is achieved through the comprehensive care and placement of one spayed or neutered animal with a family that will honor their lifelong commitments to him/her than is achieved by placing 10 animals with persons who are permitted to adopt an animal based solely on their ability to pay an adoption fee and who will readily sign a contract agreeing to have an animal spayed or neutered when, in reality, up to 50% fail to comply with such agreements, which only serves to perpetuate the overpopulation and continued suffering of companion animals.

4. Increasing the impact of NHES' alliance partnerships with other reputable animal welfare organizations.

NHES believes it is important to build working relationships with other reputable nonprofits to achieve an optimum reduction in suffering, and NHES has been participating in such partnership for over 20 years.

5. Increase distributions of emergency food stores and supplies to animals in need.

NHES operates a food bank and distributes food to individuals and organizations whose animals are in need of emergency relief.

NHES' strategies for achieving Goal 1, include:

a. Increasing snail mail and e-mail contacts with more elementary school administrators and teachers in advance of the school year to give adequate time for them to consider/include NHES' free humane education presentations in their planned activities.

b. Expand awareness of NHES' Humane Education & Advocacy Program via social media venues as a means of increasing requests for humane education materials and presentations nationwide.

NHES' strategies for achieving Goal 2, include:

a. Continuing a focused effort on advertising the availability of Spay Today's reduced-cost services throughout select areas of the quad-state region (WV, MD, VA, PA).

b. Utilize social media venues to drive more people to Spay Today's website.

c. Raise more restricted funds to provide spay/neuter assistance to the more impoverished members of our society.

NHES' strategies for achieving Goal 3, include:
a. Adhering to mandatory spay/neuter of all animals before adoption—including early-age spay/neuter of puppies and kittens and standardized veterinary medical care that includes:

- Dental Cleanings
- Lyme, Erlichia, Anaplasmosis & Heartworm tests for dogs
- Feline Leukemia and Feline AIDS tests for cats
- Rabies Vaccinations
- DHLPP & Bordetella Vaccinations for dogs
- FeLV & FVRCP Vaccinations for cats
- Fecal Checks & Dewormings (2 treatment minimum)
- Specialized medical care as required

b. Empowering staff to make adoption decisions that focus on matching an animal's predominant traits and characteristics with the lifestyles of applicants.

c. Conducting mandatory follow-up interviews with adoptive persons/families at intervals of 1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks, 6 months and 1 year to address any behavior problems.

d. Maintaining a return-rate (animals returned to BAAC after adoption) of 5% or less.

NHES' strategies for achieving Goal 4, include:

a. At present, NHES assists 3 reputable animal welfare organizations on the East Coast whose work embodies one of NHES' 12 Guiding Principles for the creation of a more humane world. NHES will try to build on these partnerships by increasing the amount of assistance provided or, as opportunity and funding permit, increase the number of alliance partners.

NHES's strategies for achieving Goal 5, include:

a. Making a concerted effort through in-person contacts and social media communications to make animal welfare organizations within reasonable driving distances of NHES Campus know that emergency food stores are available to individuals and organizations in need.

b. Contact human food banks and Meals on Wheels programs within select areas of the tristate region (WV, MD, VA) to see if additional food assistance for animals is needed.

c.Utilize volunteers to transport and deliver needed food supplies

Since 1948, NHES has faced many challenges and has withstood the test of time--thanks to dedicated supporters who share NHES' belief system that all animals have intrinsic value and who have given generously to support our programs. Beyond this, NHES' capabilities include for:

Goal 1, since 2010, NHES has achieved national approval from the Combined Federal Campaign for having provided meaningful and measurable programs services in a minimum of 16 states during each of the previous 3 year terms.

In addition, each year, NHES's 24-acre campus receives nearly 10,000 visitors and we strive to educate them about the actions that each of us can take to help reduce animal suffering and thereby create a more humane world. Beyond this, the current NHES humane education team is experienced and has successfully addressed thousands of students in more than 10 states in the U.S., and have developed a successful process for generating requests for presentations from elementary school administrators and teachers.

Goal 2, NHES took over the operation of Spay Today in 2001. In FY2019, Spay Today met a major milestone by surpassing 70,000 spay/neuter procedures performed since its creation.

As present, Spay Today partners with 24 participating veterinary hospitals and nonprofit spay/neuter facilities whose combined service areas include portions of VA, WV, MD, and PA.

For Goal 3, since BAAC became operational in October 2000, NHES has never deviated from its standard-setting adherence to “providing comprehensive rescue, rehabilitative and adoption services for animals that focus on quality first …."

Since 1950 through June 30, 2019, BAAC and its predecessor Peace Plantation have rescued, rehabilitated and placed 37,616 cats and dogs in their forever homes. While the number of annual adoptions are subject to fluctuation from year to year, the return rate has never gone above 7%, and adherence to comprehensive standards of care never changes.

For Goal 4, our Alliance Partnership program began over 20 years ago with our first partner, Operation Catnip of Gainesville, FL, which operates out of the University of Florida's School of Veterinary Medicine.

Today, Operation Catnip is our longest-tenured partner, and we have expanded our partnerships to include additional organizations such as The Network for Endangered Sea Turtles, and Friends of Felines—Hatteras Island, both located in North Carolina.

For Goal 5, NHES already operates a successful food bank program that distributes emergency animal food and supplies to individuals and organizations in need in portions of Virginia and West Virginia. For example, in FY 2019, NHES distributed over 5 tons of emergency food to individuals and animal rescue groups throughout the tristate and beyond that helped feed 1,350 cats and dogs.

For a national program with a very small budget, NHES is proud of its activities. For example, our accomplishments during FY 2019 are visible “By the Numbers":

In FY 2019, we:
Welcomed 8,591 visitors from Canada, Romania, 24 states and Washington, D.C. to the NHES campus.

Spread our humane message of treating animals with kindness and respect to 20,875 children and adults across the country.

Fed, spayed/neutered, microchipped, rescued, rehabilitated, released, placed in quality adoptive homes, or otherwise helped 8,039 cats and dogs, 57 sea turtles, and—unknown numbers of ground-nesting birds and monarch butterflies

Plus:
The Education Team distributed over 6,000 humane education guides, educational brochures, and informational posters to humane societies, service agencies, veterinary offices, schools, and rescue groups in 34 states.

The Education Team visited sixty-two schools in nine different states over the course of the school year, talking to children about the importance of being kind, responsible, and safe with all of the animals around them.

Spay Today provided 3,848 reduced-cost spay/neuter procedures.

The Briggs Animal Adoption Center placed 312 cats and dogs in quality adoptive homes with compassionate people who will fulfill their lifetime commitments to these deserving animals.

The BAAC Food Bank distributed over 5 tons of emergency food to individuals and animal rescue groups throughout the tristate and beyond that helped feed 1,350 cats and dogs.

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.10

Average of 0.89 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.1

Average of 1.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 18% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

The National Humane Education Society

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The National Humane Education Society

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The National Humane Education Society

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of The National Humane Education Society’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$84,388 $377,080 -$25,663 $274,711 $961,914
As % of expenses -2.4% 10.7% -0.7% 9.0% 33.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$195,805 $267,278 -$139,229 $156,746 $847,323
As % of expenses -5.4% 7.4% -3.8% 5.0% 28.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,335,505 $4,135,532 $3,332,549 $3,290,424 $4,660,821
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.8% 24.0% -19.4% -1.3% 41.6%
Program services revenue 17.5% 14.1% 17.1% 17.1% 12.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.8% 2.1% 0.7% 0.7% 0.4%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 79.8% 82.5% 80.6% 80.3% 78.9%
Other revenue 2.0% 1.3% 1.6% 1.8% 8.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,501,870 $3,516,291 $3,560,540 $3,048,316 $2,845,294
Total expenses, % change over prior year 3.1% 0.4% 1.3% -14.4% -6.7%
Personnel 36.7% 38.2% 37.6% 40.6% 42.5%
Professional fees 1.8% 1.7% 1.8% 1.1% 0.9%
Occupancy 1.9% 2.2% 1.9% 2.0% 2.0%
Interest 1.5% 1.5% 1.3% 1.7% 1.5%
Pass-through 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 57.9% 56.3% 57.4% 54.6% 53.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,613,287 $3,626,093 $3,674,106 $3,166,281 $2,959,885
One month of savings $291,823 $293,024 $296,712 $254,026 $237,108
Debt principal payment $50,433 $51,501 $62,432 $0 $150,537
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $3,955,543 $3,970,618 $4,033,250 $3,420,307 $3,347,530

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Months of cash 0.8 2.2 0.7 2.0 8.1
Months of cash and investments 4.0 5.3 4.1 5.1 12.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.4 4.3 3.8 5.1 9.0
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Cash $221,258 $656,442 $205,859 $508,623 $1,922,087
Investments $940,792 $910,030 $998,903 $793,709 $965,139
Receivables $50,580 $111,925 $146,985 $445,976 $545,624
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,523,096 $3,574,848 $3,615,874 $3,576,091 $3,600,236
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 45.0% 47.4% 49.7% 51.3% 53.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 46.8% 39.3% 41.7% 45.0% 27.6%
Unrestricted net assets $1,669,823 $1,937,101 $1,797,872 $1,954,618 $2,801,941
Temporarily restricted net assets $13,536 $237,399 $100,881 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $13,536 $237,399 $100,881 $2,045 $978,970
Total net assets $1,683,359 $2,174,500 $1,898,753 $1,956,663 $3,780,911

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Mr. James D. Taylor

Jim Taylor is the grandson of NHES founder, Anna C. Briggs. He began his career in the animal welfare field at a very young age by accompanying Mrs. Briggs on a wide variety of rescue missions along the East Coast states. One of the more notable missions was the rescue of more than 300 cats from within the catacomb of tunnels underneath Grand Central Station in New York City during the early 80's. Following the completion of his college education and work in the human services field, Jim returned to work with NHES in 1993 as the Program Services Director. Today, he serves as the Executive Director with a focus on growing NHES' resources in an effort to achieve an optimum reduction in animal suffering through NHES' programs and thereby help create a more humane world.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The National Humane Education Society

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

The National Humane Education Society

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

James Taylor

President

Term: 2018 - 2022

James Taylor

Christina Fernandez

Cynthia Taylor

Margaret Janes

Anne Small

Ernest Lico

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/30/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser