PLATINUM2024

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Cultivating awareness of and community response to combat sex trafficking through community education, survivor support services, and advocacy for change in social and judicial systems.

aka Meet Me at the Well   |   WILMINGTON, DE   |  www.thewellde.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

EIN: 47-1968538


Mission

Meet Me at the Well Foundation is a faith-based organization, committed to attaining the greatest outcomes in working alongside people that are healing from exploitation and human trafficking in their pursuit of independent living and meaningful employment.

Notes from the nonprofit

As a relatively young and growing non-profit, we realize the value of supportive and independent assessment. We are currently in the process of implementing the Outcomes for Human Trafficking Survivors (OHTS) Instrument. This evaluation instrument is designed to help comprehensive service programs monitor progress toward outcomes among victims and survivors of human trafficking. Once implemented, we look forward to sharing our outcomes with Candid.

Ruling year info

2015

Executive Director

Diana Suchodolski

President/Chairman

Marcia Ferranto

Main address

1601 MILLTOWN RD STE 8

WILMINGTON, DE 19808 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-1968538

Subject area info

Sexual assault victim services

Freedom from violence and torture

Freedom from slavery

Free goods distribution

Food delivery

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Preteens

Adolescents

Adults

People with psychosocial disabilities

People with intellectual disabilities

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Survivors of sex trafficking and exploitation face many challenges in their efforts to recover from the traumas they have experienced and develop a healthy life. They are likely to be impoverished, have little or no family support, suffer from mental health and substance abuse issues as well as educational deficits which limit their opportunities for self determination. They may also have legal issues which further limit their ability to obtain social supports. In addition, survivors often face a lack of understanding from the professionals they go to for help. This can lead to unrealistic expectations and inappropriate demands on survivors, often forcing these survivors to return to “the life” in order to meet their basic needs. It is our mission to address these social deficits through awareness and preventative education, professional training, and direct service opportunities, as well as through support and collaboration with other community agencies.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fresh Start

Goal: Assisting survivors in their efforts to safely leave sex trafficking and exploitation through the provision of household necessities, such as food and/or furnishings.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Social and economic status
Sex workers
Sexual identity

We offer a range of programming for survivors of sex trafficking and exploitation and the professionals who serve them, which focus on healthy living, empowerment, awareness and community leadership.
These offerings include public awareness sessions related to sex trafficking and exploitation in our community, training and supporting professionals about trauma informed and responsive care, and direct service empowering survivors to be aware of their worth. We also hope to create a network of peers who can support each other as they transition from living as victims to living as valued members of the community.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
Sexual identity
Sex workers
Adults

The Amy Day Scholarship supports survivors of sex trafficking in meeting their educational goals.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Trafficking Sheltered Alliance 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, Women and girls, LGBTQ people, At-risk youth

Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Through outreach efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic, we learned that trafficking had migrated further underground & online. As restrictions lessened, service recipients almost doubled.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hygiene kits distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

in 2021 there was a spike in requests for outreach and hygiene kits. This may have been related to the easing up of COVID-19 restrictions.

Number of clients who report feeling less isolated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We did not measure this before 2022.

Number of care packages delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers correspond to ($) dollar amount spent on care packages. Care packages consist of small gifts of comfort provided in times of great stress or a holiday. This was not measured before 2022.

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These number are the percentage (%). 2023 - 15 out of 17 2022 - 7 out of 8 2021 - 6 out of 7 2020 - 4 out of 5

Number of clients who show a measurable decrease in PTSD symptoms

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEAL Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

67% in 2022, we did not measure this before 2022.

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Amy Day Scholarship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Over $22,000 in academic support scholarships awarded in the last 4 years.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We want to raise public awareness and decrease vulnerability to the dangers of sex trafficking and exploitation. We want to serve survivors in their efforts to overcome the trauma of victimization, and achieve their independent living and educational goals. We want to help professionals understand the devastating effects of trauma and empower them to respond to survivors appropriately and effectively. We also want to partner with community agencies and provide mutual support in the mission of responding to sex trafficking.

We provide community training opportunities for sex trafficking and exploitation awareness and prevention. We offer training to professionals in trauma informed and responsive care. We offer direct support to survivors to meet needs for household goods, scholarships for their educational advancement and programming to support healthy relationships with self and others. We offer training opportunities for professionals, and hope to create an ongoing peer consultation network to promote best practices in trauma response. We collaborate with agencies in the community to immediately respond to survivors' needs for support.

We have a small but dedicated team of professionals who share a calling to respond to the realities of sex trafficking through awareness, prevention and service. Our team members have expertise in leadership, education, advocacy and trauma responsiveness. We have a program which provides for needs that are not otherwise being met in the community. We have forged strong partnerships with other agencies who respect and rely on us. We have expert mentorship helping us navigate the challenges we face.

Through our gracious donors, we have furnished (or helped furnish) living spaces for every survivor who has been referred to us who is moving into her own home, and we have provided scholarships to every survivor who has applied, to offset tuition and to cover other educational expenses. In partnership with other trafficking-response organizations and teams in our area, we have facilitated three day-long trafficking awareness conferences and are preparing to facilitate our fourth. We have facilitated numerous trafficking awareness, healthy relationship, and trauma-awareness sessions throughout our area. Additionally, we partnered with several organizations to sponsor a two-day complex-trauma response seminar for professionals who work with survivors of sex trafficking and other trauma.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It can be difficult to locate clients we have served due to transient tendecies.

Financials

Meet Me at the Well Foundation
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

127.11

Average of 63.55 over 2 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23.7

Average of 11.8 over 2 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 4% over 2 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Meet Me at the Well Foundation’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $135,782
As % of expenses 135.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $135,553
As % of expenses 135.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $235,907
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0%
Program services revenue 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0%
Investment income 0.2%
Government grants 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.6%
Other revenue 0.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $100,124
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0%
Personnel 38.7%
Professional fees 20.8%
Occupancy 9.6%
Interest 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0%
All other expenses 30.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $100,353
One month of savings $8,344
Debt principal payment $0
Fixed asset additions $0
Total full costs (estimated) $108,697

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2023
Months of cash 23.7
Months of cash and investments 23.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 23.5
Balance sheet composition info 2023
Cash $197,399
Investments $0
Receivables $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,600
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 42.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.8%
Unrestricted net assets $0
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A
Total restricted net assets $0
Total net assets $196,760

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2023
Material data errors No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Diana Suchodolski

Diana engages in trauma informed practices supporting survivors working towards life-changing goals. Diana has a Bachelor of Science in Public Policy & Public Service with a concentration in Leadership, is trained in the SERVE model to provide trauma responsive advocacy and has completed the 45-hour training with Pennsylvanias Domestic Violence Prevention Project for providing support in residential programs. Diana has served as Project Coordinator for Delawares Human Trafficking Interagency Coordinating Council (HTICC) and supports various state and non-profit agencies in developing and broadening Delawares response to human trafficking through victim support services, collection and evaluation of data, training, and public awareness efforts.

President/Chairman

Marcia Ferranto

Marcia Ferranto is known in the non-profit world for her reputation as a motivational and transformative leader. Much of her career has been focused on improving the non-profit business model. As an accomplished Senior Executive with international, national, and local experience, Marcia is dedicated to leading non-profits through launch, transition, and the enhancement of missions leading to greater fundability. By helping a wide variety of non-profit organizations, she has become instrumental in refocusing the non-profit business model to fit into todays ever-changing business environment. As a proven negotiator, relationship builder and team player, conversant in change management, turn-arounds, and government relations, Marcia has directly influenced positive outcomes related to how the non-profit business model has impacted international, national, and local initiatives and the lives and professions that have been enhanced by its efforts.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Meet Me at the Well Foundation

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Marcia Ferranto

Mashiya Williams

Secretary

David Wolanski

Treasurer

Suzanne Rouleau

Vice President

Cheri Collins

Member-at-Large

Diana Suchodolski

Executive Director

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.