PLATINUM2024

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

8 Martial Arts Taught as 1

aka Oom Yung Doe Kirkland   |   KIRKLAND, WA   |  www.oomyungdoe-nw.com
GuideStar Charity Check

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

EIN: 82-2858274


Mission

Oom Yung Doe seeks to help people improve their condition and their lives through the practice of Traditional Martial Arts (Moo Doe). Over the centuries the movements and philosophies taught in the Moo Doe line have helped practitioners achieve longevity and a superb quality of life. The movements are taught in a holistic and balanced way that is transformational for students of any age or condition. Our mission is to promote Health and Wlellness in our community through Traditional Martial Arts.

Ruling year info

2018

President

Michelle Judy

Main address

8512 122ND AVE NE NO 67

KIRKLAND, WA 98033 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-2858274

Subject area info

Physical therapy

Community mental health care

Community recreation

Diversity and intergroup relations

Population served info

Children

Adolescents

Adults

LGBTQ people

Women and girls

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities (N30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

“Challenge life, don’t wait for life to challenge you”. It is our mission to accept life’s challenges as a way to improve one’s self, taking personal responsibility for our own destiny, while not blaming others for our faults. Through this mantra all can become united, and live a more meaningful life. We offer Traditional Martial Arts training programs to help our community address both physical issues such as limited movement, injury recovery, general fitness, weight loss and mental issues such as PTSD, Neuro-diversity, and Stress-Relief.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women's Self Defense

Women's Self-Defense courses are designed to quickly teach women and teen-girls a few movements that work well with a woman's natural strengths and can be quickly effective against an attacker.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Find Peace Within Yourself. With so much uncertainty in the world, whether it comes from job pressures or family dynamics or something else, stress is a factor in all of our lives. Now more than ever, it is important that we take a little bit of time for yourself, to find inner peace.

Oom Yung Doe offers a variety of seminars that support stress relief through Tai Chi and Iron Kim Moving Meditation programs. These movements are gentle on the body and easy to pick up but have tremendous ability to release stress and calm the mind.

With just one seminar, you will enjoy lower levels of stress and anxiety. With regular practice you may also see improvement in balance, flexibility, strength and stamina as well as lower blood pressure, improved heart health, reduction of inflammation, to a renewed body condition and overall physical and mental strength.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Health
Sexual identity

We offer a variety of children's camp programs using Traditional Martial Arts to help children build confidence in themselves, develop coordination in their bodies, and gain social skills to resist negative peer pressures. Our camps offer a variety of focuses including Anti-Bullying Training, Self-Defense, Personal Safety, and Youth Leadership skills.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students reaching 4th Section (1/2 way to Black Belt)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Young adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

4th Section marks halfway to 1st Degree Black Belt. It typically takes an adult 1 to 1.5 years to reach this, a teen student will take about 2 years, and a child student may take up to 3 years.

Number of Women completing self defense courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women

Related Program

Women's Self Defense

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children attending community programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Youth Camps

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Student who reach 1st Degree Black Belt

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Students achieving 1st Degree Black Belt are completing a program that takes between 2 and 5 years to complete.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Oom Yung Doe Kirkland seeks to help our community improve Health and Wellness through Traditional Martial Arts Training. Our goal is to provide opportunities for members of our community to benefit from the practice of Traditional Martial Arts through programs such as Women's Self Defense, Children's Anti-Bullying Training, Stress Relief Seminars in addition to the Traditional Martial Arts Black Belt Programs.

We offer Traditional Martial Arts training for community members seeking general fitness, mental focus, and improved physical condition. We offer free seminars to the community for children's safety, senior mobility, women's self-defense, stress relief, and more. Currently our Women's Self Defense and Stress Relief programs are offered every month and we are working to expand these so that more of our community can benefit. We are also working on expanding our children's programs for physical and mental benefit to include weeklong camp style programs at least three times over the year.

Over the past couple of years, we have been able to establish our core community programs in addition to our long term black belt training programs. Our next steps are to start making contacts with other organizations and business in our community to improve access to the programs and spread the word about the benefits that can be gained through Traditional Martial Arts. In addition to the growth in our community programs, we are also working on improving our instructional team and our systems for supporting our long term black belt programs across multiple physical locations.

The desire to see individuals achieve their most authentic, best self and through these individuals build a stronger more peaceful community. We see over and over again just how much the individuals who take training with us, whether it's for a day or for years, benefit from the programs we offer. The passion and dedication to plan for how we bring our programs to our broader community are all in place. Our biggest limiting factor is our ability to train new members of our Instructional team fast enough to meet the growing demand for our programs. We are working to update, improve, and formalize our training process to make it more accessible. With a stronger, more robust system in place to support our Instructional Team, we will be able to focus on the networking and marketing that will be necessary to expand our programs deeper into our community.

This past year (2022) marks our 5th year as a non-profit, though Traditional Martial Arts has been around longer. We can proudly say that while it's been a journey full of unexpected challenges and learning to grow in new directions, we are doing exactly that - growing. Even with the pandemic related setbacks and challenges for programs that rely heavily on in-person training, the individuals who connect with our programs consistently express how much they have benefited from the programs.

We are now operating our long term black belt training programs across multiple locations, including one location with over 100 active students. In addition to our long term programs, we have also increased access to our Women's Self-Defense courses by 19% over pre-pandemic levels and continue to grow our Stress Relief Community programs as well. These are really strong results and demonstrate the need for our programs. In order to continue this growth, we will need to make connections outside of our immediate schools and take the programs into large businesses and other organizations in our area.

This is a huge transition for us and we are excited to see others stepping in to help who share our passion. We are looking forward to continuing to build these programs and more in the coming years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

68.17

Average of 18.67 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.2

Average of 1.1 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $22,620 $18,534 $98,459
As % of expenses 9.5% 7.4% 22.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $22,620 $18,534 $98,459
As % of expenses 9.5% 7.4% 22.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $259,762 $268,694 $567,602
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 0.0% 111.2%
Program services revenue 87.9% 80.3% 53.8%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 8.7% 2.5%
All other grants and contributions 13.1% 12.0% 44.3%
Other revenue -1.0% -1.0% -0.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $237,142 $250,160 $434,343
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 0.0% 73.6%
Personnel 0.0% 8.1% 31.0%
Professional fees 1.8% 0.3% 4.9%
Occupancy 33.8% 25.3% 25.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 64.4% 66.2% 38.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $237,142 $250,160 $434,343
One month of savings $19,762 $20,847 $36,195
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $797 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $256,904 $271,804 $470,538

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.5 1.2 4.2
Months of cash and investments 1.5 1.2 4.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.4 1.2 3.4
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2021 2022
Cash $29,662 $25,215 $151,496
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $43 $2,401 $9,996
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,772 $3,569 $3,569
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 8.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.3% 5.6% 1.4%
Unrestricted net assets $31,420 $29,433 $127,573
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $34,800
Total net assets $31,420 $29,433 $162,373

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Michelle Judy

Michelle began her training in 2010 at the Kirkland school. Having taken several other hard styles of martial arts before, she originally stopped by the school because of an interest in the Kung Fu and weapons training. Once she started training, she soon saw the difference between Moo Doe and her previous martial arts experiences. Michelle became interested in teaching when she was invited to assist with a series of self-defense lesson at a local school. She discovered that she enjoyed helping students improve themselves and their understanding of martial arts and began training as an instructor. She has gone on to specialize in teaching Women's Self-Defense courses and Children's programs.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Oom Yung Doe@Kirkland

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Michelle Judy

Kirkland Oom Yung Doe

Term: 2021 - 2024

Jonathan Criddle

Tomas Grate

Robert Sawinski

Heather MacKenzie Graham

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/10/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.