PLATINUM2023

The Harvest Fund

#FutureFemaleFarmer

aka The Harvest Fund   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.theharvestfund.org
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The Harvest Fund

EIN: 84-3031919


Mission

Our mission is to better the lives of female farmers through improved income, food security, and nutrition.

Ruling year info

2019

Executive Director

Michelle Kurian

Technical Director

Ackson Mwanza

Main address

1802 Vernon Street NW, #1103 ATTN: Michelle Kurian

Washington, DC 20009 USA

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EIN

84-3031919

Subject area info

Climate change

Agriculture, fishing and forestry

Economic development

Microfinance

Social enterprise

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Population served info

Women

Parents

People of African descent

Extremely poor people

Farmers

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

International Agricultural Development (Q31)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

AGPower: The Harvest Fund's Core Model

We work with women's farming cooperatives in southern Zambia, a country that ranks in the bottom 20th percentiles for hunger and economic development. Due to our cooperatives' rural location, they lack basic necessities. Since 2019, we have provided training in climate-smart agriculture and solar-powered irrigation systems for year-round farming. The cooperatives also receive fertilizer, agrochemicals, and seed/seedlings for legumes, maize/corn, and tomatoes. We also help them access markets and share their revenue which goes towards input and equipment loan repayment. Our long-term goal is to help the cooperatives add value to their crops by processing or freezing the crop (e.g. converting the maize into maize meal or powdering the tomatoes into tomato powder).

Even with an annual budget of less than $200,000 and only 4 full-time staff members, 75% of whom are women, we have successfully scaled from 15 to 200 women farmers in just 3 years, despite a pandemic.

Population(s) Served

Oftentimes, agricultural development programs focus solely on technical skills, but our organization recognizes the importance of mindset shifts and soft-skills training for marginalized women. For each of the farmers in our cooperative, we provide support in leadership, problem-solving, budgeting, and planning skills alongside agricultural training. We prioritize each cooperative member ensuring that everyone feels valued and supported, leading to increased confidence and prosperity. Because of our efforts, 30% of women have started to explore alternative income-generating opportunities, moving beyond subsistence levels. By teaching women how to generate additional income and providing opportunities to repay loans, 10% of women have been able to stop relying on government assistance programs. The ultimate aim of our program is to increase each farmer's income by 5X, ensure access to a nutritious diet, and enable all of the women's children to attend school full-time.

Population(s) Served

Many of the farmers with whom we work reside in straw-thatched huts and face challenges such as unreliable access to running water, electricity, and cellular connectivity. Additionally, the majority of our farmers are widows and serve as the family matriarchs.

To address these issues, we collaborate with cooperatives that have limited access to water, who often rely on hand-dug wells that frequently run dry. Our program involves drilling a borehole for each cooperative and installing a solar-powered irrigation system. We also provide a hose and supplies to build a fence around the irrigated plot.

Unlike other farms in the region that use diesel to power their water pumps, we promote a climate-smart approach by sourcing solar-powered water pumps. These pumps efficiently lift water and deliver it to the cooperative's plot. By implementing solar-powered irrigation, the farmers are able to cultivate crops throughout the year, so that food security remains at 100%

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Farmers
Women and girls
Farmers
People of African descent
Widows and widowers
Extremely poor people
Women and girls
Farmers
People of African descent
Widows and widowers
Extremely poor people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of target crop harvested

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AGPower: The Harvest Fund's Core Model

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Financials

The Harvest Fund
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The Harvest Fund

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Harvest Fund

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Michelle Kurian

Michelle's expertise extends to her tenure at Gates Ventures (formerly Global Good), TechnoServe, and Digital Green, where she played pivotal roles in driving impactful initiatives and making a tangible difference in the field of agriculture. A former strategy consultant, she uses her management skills to lead The Harvest Fund. Michelle's educational background further solidifies her qualifications. She holds an MBA from Columbia University, which has equipped her with the tools to navigate complex business landscapes. Additionally, her Bachelor's degree in Economics from Duke University serves as the foundation for her deep understanding of economic principles and their implications for rural African development. She currently sits on the board of the Chazen Institute for Global Business at Columbia University. With her exceptional leadership abilities, Michelle Kurian is committed to driving positive change and fostering sustainable growth for the Zambian economy and beyond.

Technical Director

Ackson Mwanza

With over 10 years of experience in small-scale farmer extension, Ackson is a dedicated changemaker in smallholder communities. He has served as an Agriculture Programme Advisor for the Irish NGO Self-Help Africa, a Senior Agricultural Officer with the Zambian Ministry of Agriculture, and a Trainee with Zambia Sugar. Leveraging his expertise in conservation agriculture, he serves on the board of the Green Agriculture Youth Organization. Moreover, he goes above and beyond for his community, even serving as a board member of a local disaster relief organization, Abel Musumali Foundation. With a Bachelor's of Science in Agronomy from the University of Zambia and a Master's of Professional Services in International Agricultural and Rural Development from Cornell University in the United States, Ackson possesses a strong educational background that sets him apart as a Technical Director. As a Mandela Youth Fellow and Humphrey Fellow, he has the leadership skills to grow The Harvest Fund.

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

The Harvest Fund

Board of directors
as of 12/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Michelle Kurian


Board co-chair

Ackson Mwanza

The Harvest Fund

Term: 2019 - 2029

Martha Haile

Hello Tractor

Ogo Ibok

Sence Agriculture

William Chilufya

Hivos

James Robbins

Trevor Maisiri

Food for the Hungry

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data