PLATINUM2024

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Honoring the Past - Protecting the Future

aka MCHE   |   Overland Park, KS   |  https://mchekc.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

EIN: 48-1127376


Mission

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education (MCHE) teaches the history of the Holocaust, applying its lessons to counter indifference, intolerance, and genocide.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director/CEO

Jessica Rockhold

Main address

5801 W. 115th St. Suite 106

Overland Park, KS 66211 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

48-1127376

Subject area info

History

Education services

Diversity and intergroup relations

Population served info

Adolescents

Adults

Religious groups

Jewish people

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education teaches the history of the Holocaust, applying its lessons to counter indifference, intolerance, and genocide. Through the lessons of the Holocaust we address issues of othering (including but not limited to current antisemitism), information literacy and the dangers of propaganda, and personal and societal responsibility for intervention in human rights issues. MCHE also seeks to collect and preserve the testimony of Holocaust survivors, making it accessible for all people in the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Teacher Education

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education engages professional educators as volunteers in the Isak Federman Holocaust Teaching Cadre as our ambassadors of Holocaust education. Meeting monthly, they have served as teacher trainers, curriculum designers, bloggers, and as an educational focus group. In addition, MCHE offers graduate level courses and after-school workshops covering both pedagogy and historical content.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education offers a free multi-part monthly program series featuring films that focus on a particular Holocaust theme.  We welcome sponsors for either the series ($500-$1,000) or for individual films ($150).

Population(s) Served
Adults

In February 2016, MCHE offered its first adult education series, taught for 5 consecutive weeks by our public historian, Dr. Shelly Cline. The topic that year focused on ghettos. Based on demand, we are offering both a fall and spring course this year. We are completing the fall course that examined various types of documents. The spring course, which we expect to be fully subscribed, is "Auschwitz and Beyond: A Comparative Look at the Camp System."

Population(s) Served
Adults

Adult children of Holocaust survivors describe their parents' experiences, either at individual schools or as a panel presentation for school groups at the Jewish Community Campus. Many incorporate Power Points and/or portions of their parents' narratives in their presentations, thus personalizing the accounts by reflecting the faces and voices of the survivors.Individual presentations are also offered for civic, corporate and religious groups upon request.  There is no charge to the schools for programs at their institutions. Twice annually, MCHE offers Second Generation panels at our location, and for this, the schools are charged a minimal fee per student to assure their attendance. The program budget allows for those to be presented in the White Theatre of the Jewish Community Center, where there are additional costs.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

This annual contest, launched in 1995, encourages students in grades 8 through 12 to submit document-based essays of up to 1,200 words on a given theme, which changes annually. Essays and documentaries are judged in two age divisions 8-9 grade and 10-12. From the preliminary round, ten finalists advance to the blue ribbon round and from there, the top winners in each category are determined at a conference of judges. Contestants and their teachers are honored at a reception in May.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The lessons of the Holocaust require us to look at human nature. As Primo Levi reminds us, "Monsters exist, but they are too few in number to be truly dangerous. More dangerous are the common men, the functionaries ready to believe and to act without asking questions."

This workshop explores the spectrum of responsibility represented by the bystanders, collaborators, and perpetrators of the Holocaust and engages audiences in an exploration of what those lessons mean in our world today.

Each presentation is customized to the audience and we currently have programs developed for adult audiences, school groups, law enforcement, faith-based audiences, and corporate and business groups interested in diversity, equity and inclusion.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Religious groups
Academics
Military personnel
Emergency responders

Where we work

Accreditations

Jewish Foundation for the Righteous Center of Excellence 2021

Awards

J.E.D.I. Award Recipient (Justice/Equity/Diversity/Inclusion) 2021

Perspective Group, LLC

Affiliations & memberships

Jewish Foundation for the Righteous Center of Excellence 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track first time members in each fiscal year beginning in 2020.

Number of website sessions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As measured in Google Analytics. We lost 6 months of data in 2023 so do not have report for that year.

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As measured in Google Analytics. We lost 6 months of data in 2023 so do not have report for that year.

Number of new website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As measured in Google Analytics. We lost 6 months of data in 2023 so do not have report for that year.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric went into use in 2020

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Having achieved an all time high in 2021 as we supported a major traveling exhibition we have sustained this level of programming.

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals attending in-person events or attending an online event during the original presentation. This does not include individuals who access our website or video programs.

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Teachers participating directly in professional development programs or community educational programs which will enhance their ability to deliver Holocaust Education in the classroom.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education seeks to:
1. Collect and preserve the testimony of Holocaust survivors.
2. Teach the lessons of the Holocaust to students in grades 7-university.
3. Engage adult learners in Holocaust history and discussions of current relevance.
4. Commemorate the experience of both survivors and victims of the Holocaust.
5. Secure financial assets to support this work.

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education offers diverse programming to serve people of all faiths and cultures in Kansas, western Missouri and throughout the Midwest. Our programs are specially designed to serve teachers, students (primarily grades seven through university) and adult civic and community groups to meet their unique needs and learning styles. These programs include Second Generation and survivor speakers, student research contests, educator professional development courses, hosting special exhibitions, film series, lunch and learns, and presentations by noted historians and authors.

The Witnesses to the Holocaust Archive is MCHE's repository of survivor testimony - all of which if publicly available to all patrons. This collection of resources is continually updated to current media platforms and supplemented with historical resources and teaching materials to ensure it's viability as a current teaching resource.

MCHE conducts four annual commemorative events to ensure the transmission of memory of our regional survivor community. These events are an International Holocaust Remembrance Day in January, and Yom Hashoah every spring, an Operation Barbarossa commemoration in June, and a Kristallnacht commemoration in November.

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education is the only Holocaust center in the state of Kansas and we serve the entirety of the Midwest. MCHE was founded in 1993 by Holocaust survivors Jack Mandelbaum and Isak Federman. We teach the history of the Holocaust, applying its lessons to counter indifference, intolerance, and genocide.

Jack and Isak’s founding vision was of an outreach center focusing all resources on education. Because of this, MCHE is not a museum, but rather a nimble, responsive organization that is able to adapt to the audience and their need.

Though a small staff of 4, MCHE's team includes a credentialed European Historian and an Executive Director with 20 years of experience in Holocaust education and a degree in non-profit management.

Our work is supported by a committed board of directors and the financial contributions of many Foundations and loyal members.

MCHE has built a stellar reputation in the Kansas City metro area for providing quality educational programming. On an annual basis our programs reach thousands of students, educators, and adult learners. We have also enjoyed 27 years of substantive partnerships with educational institutions like the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Truman Presidential Library and Museum, the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum, the National Archives, the National WWI Museum and over 50 other regional partners.

Having built a robust local presence, MCHE now seeks to expand our programming regionally into rural communities throughout the Midwest. Many of these communities have no Jewish presence and have limited or no formalized Holocaust education in their schools or community organizations. By building a digital-first model of programming MCHE seeks to offer access to high quality programming with no geographic boundaries.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.24

Average of 25.04 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.3

Average of 2.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 11% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $291,750 -$29,207 $189,163 $77,777 $111,426
As % of expenses 62.1% -7.5% 55.4% 18.7% 26.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $291,750 -$29,207 $189,163 $77,777 $111,426
As % of expenses 62.1% -7.5% 55.4% 18.7% 26.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $646,089 $375,335 $317,632 $416,442 $378,427
Total revenue, % change over prior year 80.3% -41.9% -15.4% 31.1% -9.1%
Program services revenue 0.8% 0.9% 1.6% 3.2% 1.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 7.2% 11.7% 11.8% 9.5% 13.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 16.7% 10.5% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 82.1% 96.3% 94.7% 83.7% 81.1%
Other revenue 9.9% -9.0% -24.7% -6.8% 4.5%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $470,066 $387,585 $341,262 $416,701 $418,911
Total expenses, % change over prior year 14.0% -17.5% -12.0% 22.1% 0.5%
Personnel 64.4% 59.7% 67.7% 60.2% 70.3%
Professional fees 9.2% 16.6% 16.9% 7.8% 10.2%
Occupancy 0.0% 7.6% 4.1% 7.3% 6.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 26.4% 16.1% 11.3% 24.6% 13.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $470,066 $387,585 $341,262 $416,701 $418,911
One month of savings $39,172 $32,299 $28,439 $34,725 $34,909
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $9,429 $43,571 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $509,238 $419,884 $379,130 $494,997 $453,820

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 0.9 3.0 4.3 2.7 2.3
Months of cash and investments 72.5 92.7 126.3 92.2 97.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 22.3 26.1 36.3 32.0 35.0
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $37,132 $96,024 $121,583 $94,988 $80,844
Investments $2,802,447 $2,899,048 $3,471,382 $3,108,177 $3,320,622
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $227,552 $227,552 $227,552 $227,552 $227,552
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.2% 2.1% 1.2% 0.1% 0.3%
Unrestricted net assets $872,523 $843,316 $1,032,479 $1,110,256 $1,221,682
Temporarily restricted net assets $164,193 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $1,814,596 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,978,789 $2,131,901 $2,559,790 $2,093,109 $2,171,164
Total net assets $2,851,312 $2,975,217 $3,592,269 $3,203,365 $3,392,846

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director/CEO

Jessica Rockhold

Jessica Rockhold earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Kansas. She served as the research assistant to the Senior Historian of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum before joining the staff of MCHE in June 2003. At MCHE she served as the Director of Education and the Associate Director before being named Executive Director in 2020.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/21/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Steve Cole

Retired

Term: 2022 - 2025

Karl Zobrist

Dentons

Rita Sudhalter

Retired Educator

Steve Cole

retired

Robynn Andracsek

Burns and McDonnell

Stacy Benson

Educator

Jackie Hermanson

American Century Investments

Brian Goodman

Kurt Graham

Truman Library

Mirra Klausner

Menorah Heritage Foundation

Rosanne Rosen

Stewart Stein

retired

Marvin Szneler

retired

Reggie Fink

Debbie Coe

realtor

Allen Gutovitz

retired

Lowell Tilzer

retired physician

Andrew Bergerson

professor

Alan Edelman

retired

Chuck Udell

Bill Tammeus

journalist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/12/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.