PLATINUM2023

FAMILY CENTER INC

Keeping Families Stronger, Longer

aka TFC   |   Brooklyn, NY   |  www.thefamilycenter.org
GuideStar Charity Check

FAMILY CENTER INC

EIN: 13-3910716


Mission

The Family Center’s mission is to strengthen families affected by crisis, illness or loss to create a healthier and more secure present and future for their children. Improving child and family outcomes through programs that address the behavioral and social determinants of health is the focus of our work keeping vulnerable New Yorkers stronger, longer.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Ms. Ivy Gamble Cobb

Deputy Executive Director

Mrs. Jan Hudis

Main address

493 Nostrand Avenue 3rd Floor

Brooklyn, NY 11216 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3910716

Subject area info

Legal services

Human services

Family services

Child welfare

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

Caregivers

Ethnic and racial groups

Economically disadvantaged people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As NYC experiences the impact of growing inequality and gentrification, families living in poverty, and faced with a crisis, illness or loss, continue to face multiple stressors including substance abuse, depression, domestic violence, stigma and isolation. This well-documented set of challenges frequently leads to poor health outcomes for all family members. Neglectful, unstable, or impoverished living situations pose a threat to the capacity of these families to succeed in the community. Failure to address behavioral and emotional health challenges, and the environmental factors that sustain them, carries extremely costly consequences for children, families, neighborhoods, and even the larger NYC community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Operations

The Family Center’s signature interdisciplinary model includes social, legal, behavioral health and mental health services that address vulnerable New Yorker’s needs in multiple ways. Individuals with substance use disorders, severe mental illness, HIV, and other serious health conditions are provided with counseling, education, behavioral self-management support and help maintaining optimal health. Specialized services for children and caregivers address children’s mental and behavioral health needs, and provide parenting and and caregiver support and skill building. Coping with illness and addressing grief, loss and trauma are central to all of our work with New Yorkers and their families. The Family Center is also recognized throughout NYS and nationwide for pioneering the integration of civil legal and behavioral health services for New Yorkers with complex medical conditions.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
Caregivers
Adults
Children and youth

Our research has found that children are more likely to remain in safe, stable homes with their biological parents when developmental assessments have been conducted. Family Center social-service, health and early childhood experts conduct a wide variety of assessments in order to provide our client families with appropriate, high-quality services that keep them stronger, longer.

Family Center social workers and case managers adhere to the highest level of professionalism while collaborating with clients in respectful partnerships aimed at achieving long-term family stability. Generating proven results, our experts work with clients to achieve stability for themselves and their families.

Population(s) Served
Families
Ethnic and racial groups

Navigating legal issues such as eviction can be daunting. Family Center attorneys work to keep families stronger, longer by representing them in court and providing them with legal advice.

The Family Center achieves legal outcomes for families in the following substantive areas:
• Lifetime planning, such as standby guardianships and wills
• Family law, including child custody and visitation
• Income maintenance, such as HASA benefits and food stamps
• Housing, including eviction and repairs

Working to strengthen families in sustainable ways, our attorneys also conduct clinics and workshops on the topics listed above.

The Family Center Legal Services Internship Program allows our agency to leverage resources so we can keep more families stronger, longer.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Caregivers
Parents

The Irene LeeKong Health & Wellness Institute is The Family Center's Article 31 clinic providing pediatric and family mental healthcare services. This program specializes in child trauma and treating that trauma symptoms with evidence-based models of intervention. The Family Center's teams of expert health professionals work with children and their families to employ medication adherence techniques, and to access and maintain quality healthcare, so they and their families stay stronger, longer. Our experience communicating with clients’ providers and support systems has led to the joint-development of successful treatment plans and sustainable outcomes. Over 85% of all clients experience symptom reduction after six months of consistent engagement and care.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

Healthy Branches is The Family Center's Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (Article 32 clinic), which offers mental and behavioral health interventions and supports, as well as primary medical care screenings, to New Yorkers and families struggling with substance use/misuse and severe mental health challenges. This program provides not only Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and childcare to those clients accessing that service, but also NARCAN trainings and kits to the community. Healthy Branches is an Opioid Overdose Prevention Program working to address the impact of the opioid epidemic in New York City and Central Brooklyn.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Immigrants and migrants
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers, Families of origin, Families of choice

Related Program

General Operations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric reports on the number of children, teens and family members who receive psychological or psychiatric treatment in our Article 31 mental health clinic.

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Health

Related Program

Child & Caregiver Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Family Center brings people together for support and counseling as research shows that social connections also improve clients' health. Groups range from Anger Management to Cargeivers' Corner.

Percentage of legal cases won or with verdicts or settlements benefitting clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Family relationships, Health

Related Program

Legal Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric demonstrates how many cases Family Center attorneys win on behalf of clients, as well as how many are resolved (verdicts/ settlements) with a favorable outcome for our clients.

Total number of clients whose children have been removed from home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Child & Caregiver Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The Family Center Caregiver Program provides services to families whose children or teens are at-risk for out-of-home placement.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Family Center’s mission is to strengthen families affected by crisis, illness or loss to create a healthier and more secure present and future for their children and all family members. Improving child and family outcomes through programs that address the behavioral and social determinants of health is the focus of our work keeping vulnerable New Yorkers stronger, longer.

Beginning with our pioneering demonstration project focused on helping women with end-stage AIDS develop plans for who would care for their children, TFC has conducted rigorous evaluation of our service models in order to understand what about our services works well and what needs improvement. This tradition of data driven impact analysis leads to improved child and family outcomes and contributes to the development of best practices in the field.

Many Family Center programs are evidence-based models that are part of a research protocol. In addition, The Family Center’s current trauma-informed care initiative underscores our commitment to providing efficacious services in a safe, welcoming environment where they can have the greatest positive, sustainable impact.

The Family Center’s success in reaching marginalized communities with impactful programming for the past 25+ years is the result of a well-honed service model. We serve as an expert support system for New Yorkers confronting crisis, illness or loss of any kind. Our social service, legal, and health professionals address innumerable client issues in a comprehensive manner in order to ensure lasting stability.

Further, we use a team approach to serving clients and their families, and take special guidance from past clients who meet regularly as our Consumer Advisory Committee, which serves as a ongoing focus group for our agency. To continually improve The Family Center, we regularly evaluate our organization and assess needs in the communities we serve. By analyzing internal data and participating in independent research studies, we pinpoint the most effective strategies for our clients and their communities. The result is that Family Center programs target the right neighborhoods, address the right questions for clients, and help stabilize vulnerable communities.

The Family Center staff has published findings on service outcomes in over 40 peer review journal articles. Findings of note include:
• After 6 months of receiving our medical case management and treatment adherence support services, HIV-positive clients experience lower viral loads and higher CD4 counts. After 18 months of service, hospitalization rate also drops.
• Family Center attorneys annually win over 92% of cases with outcomes beneficial for our clients.
• The Family Center’s family-based interventions show a statistically significant, positive impact on parental depression and a child’s home environment. After receiving services through our child development and parenting program, parents and caregivers are less depressed and the home environment is more intellectually stimulating.
• In 2020, our attorneys won nearly $2.5M in verdicts, settlements, reinstated benefits for clients and savings to taxpayers -all this despite the NYS and NYC courts being closed due to Covid.

As The Family Center moves forward into our 25th year of serving NYC families, we are focused on expanding our offerings to present our clients with an even more comprehensive package of services. This expansion will include not only The Family Center’s expert mental and behavioral health programming, but also primary medical care and substance use disorder support services through our new Certified Community Behavioral Health Center. The Family Center is also diversifying our funding portfolio so that our agency is less reliant on government contracts and grants and more in line with NYS Medicaid Redesign which is shifting to a value-based payment system. Finally, we plan to continue improving our trauma-informed practice.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.15

Average of 2.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.1

Average of 2.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

24%

Average of 26% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

FAMILY CENTER INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAMILY CENTER INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAMILY CENTER INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of FAMILY CENTER INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $94,368 $280,123 $325,479 $604,885 -$39,051
As % of expenses 1.9% 4.7% 5.4% 10.0% -0.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $28,156 $236,124 $282,358 $530,505 -$144,120
As % of expenses 0.6% 3.9% 4.7% 8.7% -2.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $5,113,334 $6,435,030 $6,524,607 $7,091,645 $6,630,119
Total revenue, % change over prior year 10.3% 25.8% 1.4% 8.7% -6.5%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 8.3% 8.2% 6.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 84.6% 85.0% 75.1% 73.2% 75.6%
All other grants and contributions 15.4% 14.9% 16.4% 18.5% 18.2%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $5,039,589 $6,017,027 $6,027,893 $6,035,865 $6,472,846
Total expenses, % change over prior year 6.1% 19.4% 0.2% 0.1% 7.2%
Personnel 66.1% 64.7% 66.1% 64.1% 64.3%
Professional fees 16.0% 16.8% 16.5% 19.3% 19.0%
Occupancy 7.4% 8.1% 7.1% 9.6% 7.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 10.5% 10.4% 10.4% 7.0% 9.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $5,105,801 $6,061,026 $6,071,014 $6,110,245 $6,577,915
One month of savings $419,966 $501,419 $502,324 $502,989 $539,404
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $52,633 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $206,502 $330,917 $404,571 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $5,525,767 $6,768,947 $6,904,255 $7,070,438 $7,117,319

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.2 2.3 3.9 3.8 3.1
Months of cash and investments 2.2 2.3 3.9 3.8 3.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $942,698 $1,174,931 $1,942,803 $1,899,687 $1,650,570
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $999,510 $1,368,006 $1,235,217 $1,838,146 $2,335,082
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $463,576 $670,078 $1,000,995 $1,405,566 $1,484,257
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 87.3% 67.0% 49.1% 40.3% 45.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 20.7% 28.5% 33.4% 26.3% 28.4%
Unrestricted net assets $1,546,043 $1,782,167 $2,064,525 $2,595,030 $2,450,910
Temporarily restricted net assets $228,771 $366,651 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $228,771 $366,651 $537,886 $988,781 $1,185,105
Total net assets $1,774,814 $2,148,818 $2,602,411 $3,583,811 $3,636,015

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Ivy Gamble Cobb

Ivy Gamble Cobb, LMSW, is the Executive Director of The Family Center. Ms. Gamble Cobb was part of a team of four women who established The Family Center in 1994. Ms. Gamble Cobb is featured in the videos “A Gift for My Children: Families Talk about Custody Planning”, and “Remember the Sun”, one family’s story of loss and how The Family Center helped to keep the family together, has co-authored articles on the issue of families affected by parental illness and bereaved children. Ms. Gamble-Cobb and The Family Center have significant expertise in supporting children and families impacted by trauma and the agency has launched a Trauma-informed Care Initiative in the last year. Ms. Gamble Cobb received her Bachelors Degree from New York University, her Masters degree in Social Work from Hunter College School of Social Work and has completed all coursework towards a PhD in Social Welfare.

Deputy Executive Director

Jan Hudis

Another of our four founders, serves as The Family Center's Deputy Executive Director. Prior to founding The Family Center, she worked at the NYC Department of Social Services Division of AIDS Services as a Program Planner. Jan holds both an MPA and an MPH from Columbia University. She has also co-authored numerous articles on the issues faced by families affected by HIV/AIDS.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

FAMILY CENTER INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

FAMILY CENTER INC

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

FAMILY CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 10/12/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Joel M. Field, III

New York Life

Cory DeForrest

SPF Investment Management

Marika Pritchett-Casey

Morgan Stanley

Teresa Brady

Morgan Stanley

Maggie Jiang

Bank of China

Karin Levi

LinkedIn

Scott Melvin, MD

Montefiore Medical Center

Richard Osterweil

Carolynne Perine Lee

Ashley Sarokhan

KeyBank

Vikram Shankar

Davidson Kempner

Joel M. Field, III

New York Life

Carla Lisio, LMSW

Center on Addiction

Tina Armstrong

NY Therapeutic Communities

Alex Miller

Barclay's

Afia Babar

Memorial Sloan Kettering

Nandita Sahni

Via

Bryan Roberts

New York Life

Tony O'Callaghan

UBS

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/12/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser