PLATINUM2023

Rio Grande Community Farm

A land-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization operating on Los Poblanos Fields Open Space in Albuquerque's North Valley.

Albuquerque, NM   |  https://www.riograndefarm.org

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Rio Grande Community Farm

EIN: 74-2833329


Mission

Our Statement of Purpose (we no longer use "mission") is: Providing diverse and underserved communities with equitable access to urban farmland and education in sustainable agriculture prioritizing food justice, biodiversity, and climate resilience.

Ruling year info

1998

Board President

Bruce Milne

Executive Director

Robyn Wagoner

Main address

1701 Montaño Rd. NW

Albuquerque, NM 87107 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

74-2833329

Subject area info

Biodiversity

Agriculture

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Ethnic and racial groups

Religious groups

Immigrants and migrants

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

1. Access to urban farmland is limited by economic factors. 2. People who live in Albuquerque but come from other counties may not have access to their own native foods and this impacts their health and emotional sense of belonging. 3. Conventional agriculture is destroying topsoil, emitting greenhouse gasses; poisoning land, water, and living beings; creating super weeds that obliterate farmland and ecosystems. 4. Urban children do not have access to green spaces to learn about nature firsthand and to exercise. 5. Urban communities are fragmented and houses have tall fences that prevent routine collaborative outdoor activities that build neighbor rapport, and community bonds. 6. Agriculture is a mystery to urban populations who buy their food from the store. 7. Farmworkers are underpaid. 8. Wildlife habitat is destroyed by agriculture and urban sprawl. 9. Women, LGBTQIA+, neurodiverse, disabled, and BIPOC people are disempowered and underrepresented in agricultural management positio

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Garden

Rio Grande Community farm operates the largest community garden in the State of New Mexico. The rows are 150 sq ft and include irrigation, hand tools, compost, and gardener support for only $135 per year.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Neighbors within two miles of our farm can drop off their orgaic waste for free to be composted and returned to the soil through community gardens.

Population(s) Served

Aspiring farmers, families, organizations, cooperatives, and collectives are invited to lease 1/8 of an acre of urban farmland at a low cost of $135 per year. This price includes surface water irrigation and support from our Farm staff. After the first year, additional acreage is available to lease - up to two acres total.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups

We provide education in sustainable and regenerative agriculture practices including garden climate adaptation, as well as wildlife habitat and land stewardship.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

We offer opportunities for community members to learn new skills and connect with others in an urban farm setting.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Farmers
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Farmers
Children and youth

Hosting agritourism events that educate our community about sustainable farming and celebrate our unique agricultural heritage.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

We reserve 25% of our land to conserve native and migrating species by planting forage crops and establishing permanent habitat. We implement regenerative agriculture practices to conserve biodiversity above and below the soil. We established a 1/4-acre pollinator garden 22 years ago that is thriving. We deployed bat houses and bird houses and bee houses across our property.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Maximum number of participants allowed on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Small class sizes increase effectiveness.

Area of land, in hectares, indirectly controlled by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Area of land, in hectares, indirectly controlled by the organization and under sustainable cultivation or sustainable stewardship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

MicroFarm Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Acres of land leased, purchased, or put into easement

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Acres of land managed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Acres of farmland protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Urban populations growing pesticide-free food to feed themselves and their families, while stewarding the land.
2. Individuals who were born in other countries growing their own native foods and experiencing improved health and emotional sense of belonging.
3. Inspired conventional farmers change to regenerative farming methods when they see us: improve soil health, tilth, and crumb; sequester greenhouse gasses; clean the water as it percolates into the aquifer.
4. Children learn about nature firsthand and exercise, and become stewards of the land.
5. Urban communities gather in our gardens for routine collaborative outdoor activities that build neighbor rapport, and community bonds.
6. Urban populations are educated about the science behind regenerative agriculture and celebrate our unique agricultural heritage.
7. Researchers generate important data on sustainable farm technologies that revolutionize the field.
8. Our farm workers live comfortable on their wages.
9. Connected wildlife habitat is integrated into the agricultural landscape and maintained.
10. Women, LGBTQIA+, neurodiverse, disabled, and BIPOC people are empowered and represented in agricultural management positions.

1. Increase access to urban farmland by making it affordable and offering sponsorships for underserved and diverse urban populations to farm sustainably and produce their own fresh, healthy food.
2. Provide land for people who live in Albuquerque but come from other counties to grow their own native foods and improve their health and emotional sense of belonging.
3. Demonstrate regenerative agriculture as an alternative to conventional agriculture by building topsoil, sequestering greenhouse gasses; replenishing the land, cleaning the water, and nourishing living beings.
4. Provide access to green spaces and education for children to learn about nature firsthand and to exercise.
5. Gather urban communities in our gardens to encourage routine collaborative outdoor activities that build neighbor rapport, and community bonds.
6. Offer classes by donation to urban populations about the science behind regenerative agriculture and celebrate our unique agricultural heritage.
7. Implement and demonstrate sustainable farm technologies and provide opportunities for research in these fields.
8. Pay a living wage to our farm workers.
9. Prioritize agricultural resource access for BIPOC, women, and the LGBTQIA+, neurodiverse, and disabled communities.

We lease 27 acres of land from the City of Albuquerque Open Space Division and have a close and trusting working relationship with them that has been developed over the past 27 years. The City also procured water rights for our land. We have a well, a barn, a production greenhouse, and a large array of farm equipment such as tractors, mowers, balers, no-till drill, etc.

We have two farmer/educators who are trained in regenerative and sustainable farming methods. One is a Nigerian refugee with a bachelor's degree in sustainability and crop science and the other is a lifelong farmer degreed in agricultural science with 15 years of experience.

We have an Executive Director with a masters degree in environmental studies/sustainability/climate change adaptation and permaculture design certification, and certification in cultural competency. She is also degreed in media productoin with a background in marketing and management with a food cooperative and an international non-profit permaculture organization.

We have a board that includes farmers, professors, lecturers, and PhD students from the Geography and Environment and Sustainability Studies departments at University of New Mexico; an engineer, a computer technician from Sandia National Laboratories, and a children's education professional.

Of the 27 acres we farm, two acres are devoted to a Community Garden where we host 68 gardeners on 150-ft rows including immigrants form Polynesia. We sublease 1/8-acre plots to 38 MicroFarmers including a refugee resettlement program and a neurodiverse farming collective. We offer these yearly subleases for only $135 and include irrigation, and free classes. We offer sponsorships for those who cannot afford that amount by selling special memberships for $500 or $1000 that include the gift of land to a grower-in-need.

We host two agritourism events each year that bring in 17,000 attendees for an average of less than $15 per person and educate people about our unique agricultural heritage. These events increase economic prosperity for small local vendors.

We practice regenerative agriculture using no-till methods, cover crops, Integrated Pest Management, crop rotation, and living roots. Our soil has measured 3-5% carbon which is at maximum capacity. We maintain 25% of our land for wildlife forage and habitat.

We created a stakeholder survey that will help us assess our client's an community's needs and allow us to implement programs to fulfill those needs.

We have a new Executive Director who is certified in Cultural Competency and a Board member who has undergone extensive training in DEI through her role at the University of New Mexico. These individuals are strategizing ways to interact with other organizations that are working on food justice ans social justice issues. We are developing a DEI Committee of the Board to implement trainings, and we are prioritizing BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ and disabled candidates for our BOD.



How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Rio Grande Community Farm
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Average of 0.20 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Average of 0.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Rio Grande Community Farm

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Rio Grande Community Farm

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Rio Grande Community Farm

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Rio Grande Community Farm’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2011 2012 2013
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $26,851 $18,610 -$9,168
As % of expenses 8.5% 5.6% -3.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$9,586 -$2,708 -$25,285
As % of expenses -2.7% -0.8% -9.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $342,022 $341,080 $249,455
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% -0.3% -26.9%
Program services revenue 32.6% 32.7% 24.0%
Membership dues 2.0% 1.1% 2.1%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 44.1% 52.2% 56.4%
All other grants and contributions 21.2% 14.0% 17.5%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $315,171 $333,469 $258,680
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 5.8% -22.4%
Personnel 56.0% 62.8% 68.8%
Professional fees 3.2% 1.1% 1.2%
Occupancy 1.4% 2.2% 2.6%
Interest 0.2% 0.2% 0.2%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 23.1% 33.6% 27.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2011 2012 2013
Total expenses (after depreciation) $351,608 $354,787 $274,797
One month of savings $26,264 $27,789 $21,557
Debt principal payment $2,500 $6,500 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $380,372 $389,076 $296,354

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2011 2012 2013
Months of cash 0.0 0.7 0.9
Months of cash and investments 0.0 0.7 0.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.1 0.8 0.5
Balance sheet composition info 2011 2012 2013
Cash $0 $19,646 $19,768
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $30,548 $12,601 $1,315
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $184,573 $183,749 $185,681
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 53.6% 64.7% 72.7%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 23.1% 10.8% 14.5%
Unrestricted net assets $89,365 $86,657 $61,372
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $89,365 $86,657 $61,372

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2011 2012 2013
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Board President

Bruce Milne

Bruce T. Milne is a landscape ecologist and Professor Emeritus of Biology, University of New Mexico (1986-2020).  In 2023 he was ranked among the top 2,000 Best Ecology and Evolution Scientists in the United States. His research is about landscape, regional, and global complexity in stream networks, vegetation, endangered species habitat, human group sizes and global ecological footprints. In 2004 he founded the Sustainability Studies Program and held the W.K. Kellogg Chair in Sustainable Environmental and Food Systems.  In 2006, the International Association for Landscape Ecology recognized him as Distinguished Landscape Ecologist.  From 2007-2011 he led FoodPrintNM, a community of professionals dedicated to developing a localized food system. From 2010-12 he led a USDA-funded summer foodshed field school.  In 2017, his team conducted a US Department of State Young African Leaders Institute that brought 25 sub-Saharan leaders to New Mexico to learn about sustainability in business.  

Executive Director

Robyn Wagoner

A 30-year New Mexico resident, Robyn grew up in Albuquerque's North Valley where she learned to garden from her father, a third generation farmer from Nebraska. Robyn comes to us with two decades of experience in the non-profit food justice sector with Northwest Permaculture Convergence and Olympia Food Co-op. She holds a master's degree in Environmental Studies, and has earned certifications in Permaculture Design and Cultural Competency. Robyn holds a bachelor's degree in Cinematic Arts from UNM. She is working to increase the visibility of the Farm and our many accomplishments while building our reputation as leaders in community supported agriculture and biodiversity conservation. Don't hesitate to contact her with your thoughts about how the Farm can best serve our community.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Rio Grande Community Farm

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Rio Grande Community Farm

Board of directors
as of 12/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Bruce Milne

Amber Terrasas

Chris Sylan

Bruce Milne

Paul Wright

Cassidy Tawse-Garcia

Becca Marshall

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Non-binary
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/19/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.