PLATINUM2023

Fort Bend Family Promise

Helping Families Changing Lives

aka FBFP   |   Missouri City, TX   |  www.fortbendfamilypromise.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Fort Bend Family Promise

EIN: 20-3263469


Mission

The mission of Fort Bend Family Promise is to meet the immediate needs of homeless families while empowering them toward self-sufficiency.

Notes from the nonprofit

Fort Bend Family Promise is the only organization within Fort Bend County Texas that addresses entire families experiencing a temporary episode of homelessness. Many of our families have no where else to turn. Examples of our family units since January 1, 2013:

A single mother with seven children including a 19 year old son attending college.
A husband and wife with two daughters aged 14 and 18.
A single father with three children under the age of 12.
A single mother with her adult sister and two sons under the age of 10.
A grandmother, a mother, and three children aged 8 thru 13.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Ms. Vera L Johnson

Main address

4645 Cartwright Rd

Missouri City, TX 77459 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-3263469

Subject area info

Homeless shelters

Homeless services

Population served info

Families

Homeless people

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To meet the immediate needs of homeless families while empowering them at attain self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fort Bend Family Promise

Fort Bend Family Promise provides life changing services to homeless families in Fort Bend County Texas. In 2019, we served 47 families consisting of 185 family members with a makeup that includes 105 school age children. In addition, through Information & Referral (I&R), 234 families consisting of 871 of their disadvantaged children and family members from Fort Bend County will receive information and referral services for housing, food, school services, rental/utility assistance, transportation, etc.

With finite resources available through our host congregations, staff and finances, or goal in 2020 is not to merely increase the number of families housed, but to serve a greater percentage of families with school age children. Area shelters and HUD housing options are more suited for families with young children but it is very challenging for fathers and mothers with older children to find other housing arrangements.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter 1988

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Adults

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Our program to return families to self sufficiency is developed as a partnership with both the families and our 3-piece Approach Team to ensure sustainability.

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

96.97% of families obtain permanent housing within an average of 30-60 days in our program.

Number of people no longer couch surfing or doubling up with others as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As a result of Fort Bend Family Promise's program, 182 individuals are no longer couch surfing or doubling up with others, but instead on a path to self sufficiency.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have a dedicated program called the Youth Empowerment Planning (YEP!) program that specifically meets the needs of children in families experiencing episodic homelessness.

Number of active church partnerships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An Interfaith Hospitality Network partnership is a unique relationship we have with our local churches to provide hospitality for our families, while in our program.

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Fort Bend Family Promise

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Although the average length of stay in our program is anywhere between 30-60 days, we continue to support our families with case management services in order to sustain their self sufficiency.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision an informed community where coordinated resources of many organizations and individuals meet the immediate needs of families in crises, and where throughout Fort Bend County, families experiencing homelessness are equipped and empowered to safe, independent living.

Track family outcomes and maintain the excellence of existing programs. Build new programs and partnerships. Expand programs to serve more families.

Sustain existing host and support congregations. Grow the FBFP network by recruiting additional churches. Establish a second full network of churches west of the Brazos River.

Maintain current paid staff; engage current volunteers. Recruit and train new volunteers. Provide training for on-going family mentors.

Build awareness of homelessness needs and services in Ft. Bend County. Grow the number of stakeholders who support Ft. Bend Family Promise. Be recognized as a leader in the war on hidden homelessness in Ft. Bend County.

Institute a regular giving program to support the on-going costs of the Day Center. Identify new funding sources to support new program. Establish a trust fund to sustain the expanded programs of Ft. Bend Family Promise.

Update the bylaws, establish organizational reporting & monitoring. Institute an advisory council to capture and leverage institutional knowledge. Prepare the Board to govern an expanded organization

The public of Fort Bend County effectively refers families in crisis to Fort Bend Family Promise and supports the program.

All homeless families in Fort Bend County that meet program criteria have access to the services of Fort Bend Family Promise.

All clients have immediate needs met upon entering the program.

All clients are effectively evaluated and presented an individualized program that helps prepare them for self-sufficiency.

All clients effectively apply the skills and/or knowledge from the program to be successfully self-sufficient upon completion.

Ongoing relationships with organizations (public & private, profit & nonprofit) in Fort Bend County allow Fort Bend Family Promise to achieve its mission in a cost effective manner.

The Public in Fort Bend County is well-informed about the fact and realities of homelessness in our service area.

OUR CALLING

As people of faith, we are called to help our Fort Bend County neighbors in crisis. We are passionate about helping homeless families with children get back on their feet.

Inspired by our mission and vision, as well as plans to move into our new permanent day center in Missouri City this year, we have crafted a strategic plan to guide the Board’s leadership actions in the next five years. This plan has emerged from an assessment of our current state and discussions of our shared hopes and dreams to expand the mission of Fort Bend Family Promise to parts of the county less served by our current programs. Specifically, we have examined our organizational strengths and concerns, as well as opportunities and uncertainties in the external environment.

We are excited about the future possibility of having a larger impact on homelessness in Fort Bend County, while mindful of our prime mission to serve the families who depend on our current program. Therefore, we have developed a shaping plan that prepares us for future expansion with an initial focus on strengthening our infrastructure before positioning ourselves for growth. We have identified six strategic areas of focus, as well as the linkages between them. We expect the Board to assess progress against this plan annually, and adjust action plans to achieve our long term goals.

Additionally, our strategic plan is grounded in the following core principles.


CORE PRINCIPLES

The essence of our program is to build self-sufficiency in homeless families with children.
Fort Bend Family Promise accepts families regardless of race or religion.
Our inter-faith network of congregations is the key to executing our mission.
Our reputation as an effective local non-profit sustains our funding and volunteer involvement.
Future growth and expansion must not have any negative impact on current programs.
Sustainable funding comes from a balanced mix of grants, annual giving, and a permanent trust fund / endowment.
The Board governs with faith, compassion, trust and transparency.

Programs: Tracked family outcomes and maintained the excellence of existing programs. Built new programs and partnerships. Expanded programs to serve more families.

Network: Sustained existing host and support congregations. Grew the FBFP network by recruiting additional churches. Established a second network of churches west of the Brazos River.

Staff & Volunteers: Maintained current paid staff and engaged current volunteers. Recruited and trained new staff and volunteers.

Awareness: Built awareness of homelessness needs and services in Ft. Bend County. Grew the number of stakeholders who support Fort Bend Family Promise. Recognized as a leader in the war on hidden homelessness and keeping families together in Ft. Bend County.

Stewardship: Instituted a regular giving program to support the on-going costs of the Day Center. Identified new funding sources to support new programs. Established a trust fund to sustain the expanded programs of Fort Bend Family Promise.

Governance: Updated the bylaws and established organizational reporting and monitoring. Instituted an advisory council to capture and leverage institutional knowledge. Prepared and empowered the Board to govern an expanded organization.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    families experiencing experiencing homelessness, and also families that are facing homelessness.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Monthly Diversity and Inclusion focus group both on National and local levels.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Gives them ownership and empowers them to know that their voices are heard and they have a direct impact on the services we provide.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

33.85

Average of 137.49 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.5

Average of 12 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 6% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Fort Bend Family Promise

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Fort Bend Family Promise

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Fort Bend Family Promise

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of Fort Bend Family Promise’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $292,882 -$20,916 $5,333 $74,192 -$37,313
As % of expenses 96.7% -7.7% 1.8% 19.8% -7.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $292,226 -$36,431 -$10,182 $56,765 -$60,476
As % of expenses 96.3% -12.7% -3.3% 14.5% -11.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $392,668 $308,273 $324,765 $450,833 $371,232
Total revenue, % change over prior year -5.0% -21.5% 5.3% 38.8% -17.7%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 99.9% 99.8%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $302,758 $270,481 $289,902 $373,897 $491,055
Total expenses, % change over prior year 35.4% -10.7% 7.2% 29.0% 31.3%
Personnel 37.2% 32.0% 51.3% 54.3% 38.5%
Professional fees 11.3% 17.6% 2.1% 1.6% 17.4%
Occupancy 3.0% 5.6% 7.0% 7.1% 8.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 48.5% 44.1% 39.6% 36.9% 35.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total expenses (after depreciation) $303,414 $285,996 $305,417 $391,324 $514,218
One month of savings $25,230 $22,540 $24,159 $31,158 $40,921
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $306,220 $0 $0 $38,240 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $634,864 $308,536 $329,576 $460,722 $555,139

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Months of cash 10.9 13.6 14.4 11.8 6.5
Months of cash and investments 10.9 13.6 14.4 11.8 6.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.4 8.5 8.1 7.5 4.8
Balance sheet composition info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Cash $274,484 $306,890 $346,722 $369,037 $266,311
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $9,361 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,032,704 $1,032,704 $1,032,704 $1,070,944 $1,070,944
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 2.6% 4.1% 5.6% 7.1% 9.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.6% 0.2% 0.5% 0.0% 0.6%
Unrestricted net assets $1,217,454 $1,181,023 $1,170,841 $1,227,606 $1,167,130
Temporarily restricted net assets $55,000 $113,708 $143,238 $145,982 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $55,000 $113,708 $143,238 $145,982 $63,340
Total net assets $1,272,454 $1,294,731 $1,314,079 $1,373,588 $1,230,470

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Vera L Johnson

Vera L. Johnson is the current Executive Director for Fort Bend Family Promise, serving since 2011. Johnson came to Fort Bend Family Promise with nearly twenty years of experience in the non-profit sector. Most recently, she served as vice president of program operations for the Coalition for the Homeless Houston & Harris County and preceding that position, for fifteen years as the vice president of client services with AIDS Foundation Houston.

Ms. Johnson was born in San Antonio Texas and after being held as a newborn in 1967 by First Lady of the United States, Claudia Alta "Lady Bird" Taylor Johnson (wife of President Lyndon B. Johnson) -- thereafter she became known to her family and friends as "Lady Bird."Ms. Johnson's father is Marion Johnson, who worked as a Derrickman and Tool Pusher for a local Texas based Oil Company. Her mother, Joyce Brawley, worked in the area of children protective services. Her parents were emergency based foster care parents and Ms. Johnson had one hundred (100) plus sisters and brothers over her childhood years at home.

At an early age, Ms. Johnson's mother instilled the basis of faith in our heavenly Father, love of family and to alway offer a helping hand to your fellow man. She graduated magna cum laude from Stroman High School in Victoria, Texas. She then achieved her Bachelor's of Science from Texas College and her Master's of Science from Texas Southern University. Ms. Johnson and her 19-year-old son reside in Sugar Land and have been Fort Bend County residents for twenty plus years. Ms. Johnson has a deep, grounded sensitivity and passion for this interfaith work with children and families in crisis.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Fort Bend Family Promise

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Fort Bend Family Promise

Board of directors
as of 02/01/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Jim Uschkrat

ABB Engineering

Term: 2020 - 2027


Board co-chair

Mrs. Karen Jennings

FBISD

Term: 2017 - 2027

Karen Jennings

Fort Bend Independent School District

Edward Brasher

Texas Instruments

Doug Earle

John Tipton

Amegy Bank

Rashmi Sheel

CMIT Solutions

Kirby Bledsoe

Capital Bank

Oscar Telfair

The Telfair Firm

Denise Lloyd

Christian Becerra

Fort Bend County Government

Johnathan Phillips

Magellan International LP

JaPaula Kemp

JKemp Law

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/12/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.