PLATINUM2024

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

aka The Shane Center   |   Centerburg, OH   |  www.shanecenter.org
GuideStar Charity Check

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

EIN: 31-1389943


Mission

Located at Willow Farm in Centerburg, Ohio, and situated on 40 beautiful acres in scenic Knox County,The Shane Center for Therapeutic Horsemanship, Inc. is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities through innovative equestrian activities. Since its inception, no client has ever been denied services due to their financial circumstances. The Shane Center’s vision is to provide sustainable, exceptional equine programs that remain responsive to community needs, which are collaborative with community partners, and progressive in standards and effectiveness.

Notes from the nonprofit

The word "THERAPEUTIC" in the title was misspelled by the IRS and we have not been able to get it corrected. :)

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Mrs. Karen Sanchez

Main address

7908 Myers Rd

Centerburg, OH 43011 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Equine Assisted Therapy, Inc.

EIN

31-1389943

Subject area info

Rehabilitation

Animal therapy

Equestrianism

Population served info

Adults

People with disabilities

Children and youth

NTEE code info

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Founded in 1993 as Equine Assisted Therapy, Inc. by Karen and Joel Sanchez, The Shane Center is Central Ohio’s original therapeutic riding program and has a reputation for providing safe, quality, family-oriented services that are second to none! Since its inception, no client has ever been denied services due to their financial circumstances. Providing exciting and innovative therapeutic equestrian services with high quality programming has always been our goal.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Therapeutic Riding

Our flagship program uses the medically-acknowledged benefits of riding a horse and provides a fun approach to improving the physical, emotional, and cognitive well-being of our participants. This is no PONY RIDE! Riding a horse helps take our clients beyond the confines of their dis-abilities. Students use their abilities to learn the actual skills involved in riding a horse.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Designed for independent riders with special needs, as well as typical beginner and intermediate youth and adults. Lessons focus on learning natural horsemanship methods both on the ground and in the saddle. Classes emphasize learning to ride and focus on enabling students to be well rounded equestrians.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These numbers reflect the individuals who received services from our programs. Those individuals received over800 hours of services.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Seniors, Preteens, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This number is the approximate number of hours volunteers contribute to the center each year.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Children, Adolescents, Preteens

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This number reflects the collective number of times our horses stepped into the arena for a formal lesson.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Shane Center’s vision is to provide sustainable, exceptional equine programs that remain responsive to community needs, which are collaborative with community partners, and progressive in standards and effectiveness. From its humble beginnings 27 years ago, Willow Farm has evolved into a beautiful therapeutic equestrian facility due to the efforts of the board members, the staff, the volunteers, and the families whose lives we touch. It is widely recognized that equine-assisted activities and therapies have positive benefits on the physical, emotional, social, cognitive, behavioral and educational well being of people with disabilities. Equine-assisted activities provide benefits that participants cannot typically receive through other therapies. Therapeutic riding encourages the rider to use his/her entire body to guide and control the horse as well as maintain balance. In addition to these physical requirements, an emotional bond also develops between the horse and rider. Our goal is to provide the highest quality professional equestrian activities in a rural, country setting long after its founders have retired.

The Shane Center believes in offering the highest quality, progressive programs. We are always trying to make our best even better. We are never satisfied with the status quo. This type of community investment requires strong stewardship. This is why we have chosen to go through a stringent peer review process and in 2014, we obtained the highest status in our field of a "Premier Accredited Center" through PATH, International. Our program policies ensure that the center is operating as an efficient and effective steward of its resources. We require all of our instructors to be professionally certified, which includes continuing education. All of our staff and volunteers must complete a fingerprint background check. We spend the necessary time recruiting and training our volunteers so they take “ownership” of the center. This is why our board members are “hands on”; volunteering in the arena, at fundraising events, and cultivating potential donors. Our center is proud to invest in a positive and progressive horse training program, provide as natural a setting as possible to keep the living environment for the horses stress free and conducive for their physical and mental well-being. Such an environment makes for safer, happier, healthier partners (our equines) ready to interact with our precious participants.

Situated on 40 acres, The Shane Center has great potential for providing a relaxing, quiet venue for participants and their families to enjoy away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Our programs go beyond riding as we teach all of our students the basics of horse care with an emphasis on safety and handling the horse on the ground. Instructors work with participants one-on-one to establish short and long term goals that ensure the rider receives a fulfilling experience tailored to his or her needs. Individualized curriculum is developed to complement the lesson and focuses on building critical skills unique to each rider.

Currently, The Shane Center has four Path International professional Certified instructors, and collectively, bring over 57 years of experience. The Shane Center has mentored dozens of individuals who have gone on to become certified and are teaching in other facilities throughout Ohio. The addition of certified instructors will allow us to increase the number of individuals we can serve, in response to the needs of our community.

As we approach our third decade of providing high quality programing to our community, we have a new understanding of just how resilient and fortunate our organization is. As is true for the entire world, the current pandemic has made a new “normal” for us all. The past year has presented us with what seemed insurmountable challenges. Our community of donors, volunteers, board of directors, and staff rallied together, and we met those challenges, one by one, making changes and adjustments where needed in order to continue serving the most vulnerable people in our community . In 2020, The Shane Center provided three types of program services: Therapeutic Riding, Horsin’ Around, and Shane’s Cavalry; we engaged 29 volunteers, and served 45 participants. Our horses collectively stepped into a riding lesson over 600 times in 2020 offering a much needed sense of normalcy. Our special needs population has suffered greatly mentally, physically, and emotionally due to lack of activities during this difficult time. The active participation involved in therapeutic horseback riding improves the physical, emotional, and cognitive well-being of our participants. The Shane Center has been a staple in the community for 28 years and we will do our part to bring healing, strength, and growth to a population whose lives have been turned upside down during this pandemic.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16.31

Average of 24.41 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.4

Average of 5.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 10% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $5,808 -$14,612 $52,827 $24,490 $29,706
As % of expenses 3.9% -9.9% 33.5% 13.4% 13.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$3,887 -$23,472 $44,980 $11,400 $13,362
As % of expenses -2.4% -15.0% 27.2% 5.8% 5.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $156,570 $132,869 $210,286 $206,676 $245,535
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.3% -15.1% 58.3% -1.7% 18.8%
Program services revenue 39.1% 38.1% 20.1% 22.6% 23.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 7.2% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 38.1% 34.9% 45.5% 53.3% 48.3%
Other revenue 22.8% 27.0% 27.1% 24.1% 28.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $150,762 $147,481 $157,459 $182,186 $215,829
Total expenses, % change over prior year 9.0% -2.2% 6.8% 15.7% 18.5%
Personnel 50.8% 54.3% 55.7% 62.2% 61.4%
Professional fees 5.4% 4.3% 7.6% 6.0% 5.0%
Occupancy 27.0% 26.7% 24.6% 20.5% 17.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 16.8% 14.6% 12.1% 11.3% 15.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $160,457 $156,341 $165,306 $195,276 $232,173
One month of savings $12,564 $12,290 $13,122 $15,182 $17,986
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $19,501 $24,446
Total full costs (estimated) $173,021 $168,631 $178,428 $229,959 $274,605

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.4 4.4 7.6 7.0 6.4
Months of cash and investments 5.4 4.4 7.6 7.0 6.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.2 4.0 7.5 6.8 6.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $68,037 $53,987 $100,130 $106,355 $115,731
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $238,866 $231,827 $204,330 $223,093 $245,932
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 74.4% 76.9% 75.8% 75.0% 74.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.2% 4.5% 1.2% 1.8% 3.9%
Unrestricted net assets $126,312 $102,840 $147,820 $159,220 $172,582
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $126,312 $102,840 $147,820 $159,220 $172,582

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Mrs. Karen Sanchez

Karen has a Bachelor’s Degree in Education and is a professional CTRI (Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor) and ATRI (Advanced Therapeutic Riding Instructor) She is an accomplished horsewoman, served as an equestrian judge during the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, graduated at the “A” Level of the United States Pony Club, spent 10 years participating in 4-H, and served 5 years as the organizational advisor to the Savvy Riders 4-H Club of Licking County. She is studying Level 4 of the Parelli Savvy System and has studied with numerous top horseman including Ray Hunt, Walter Zettel, Jimmy Wofford, and Pat and Linda Parelli. Karen currently competes as an adult amateur in dressage competitions aboard her partner, Quarter Note.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

THE SHANE CENTER FOR THERAPRUTIC HORSEMANSHIP INC

Board of directors
as of 02/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Joel Sanchez

Retired, State of Ohio Department of Juvenile Corrections

Term: 1993 - 2026

John Hinton

Angie Kaiser

Tom Shovelton

Connect A Voice

Erin Humphrey

Laurie Gallitin

Countryside Veterinary Center

Krystina Carter

Jessica Kenimer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable