PLATINUM2023

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Ending hunger starts with people.

aka The Hunger Project   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.thp.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

EIN: 94-2443282


Mission

The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. Our vision is a world without hunger. Our mission is to facilitate individual and collective action to transform the systems of inequity that create hunger and cause it to persist.

Ruling year info

1978

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Tim Prewitt

Main address

110 W 30th St Fl 6 - THP 6th floor

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

94-2443282

Subject area info

Education

Agriculture, fishing and forestry

Sustainable development

Rural development

Community organizing

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Rural (S32)

Women's Rights (R24)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Ending hunger and poverty by pioneering sustainable, grassroots, women-centered strategies and advocating for their widespread adoption in countries throughout the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Epicenter Strategy

Across nine countries in Africa, The Hunger Project's (THP) methodology is implemented through epicenters, clusters of rural villages where an average of 15,000 people are mobilized to become leaders of their own development, unlock local capacity for change and achieve progress on the Sustainable Development Goals.

Over an approximate 7-10 year period, an epicenter becomes self-reliant — meaning it is able to fund its own activities and no longer requires financial investment from THP.

The Epicenter Strategy focuses on women’s empowerment, reducing poverty, climate resilience, education & literacy, food security & reducing hunger, health & nutrition and water, sanitation & hygiene. Through the implementation of a community-led approach to monitoring and evaluation (M&E), our programs allow community members to identify their needs, set their own development priorities, and participate in tracking their progress on these goals over time.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Women bear almost all responsibility for meeting basic needs of the family, yet are systematically denied the resources, information and freedom of action they need to fulfill this responsibility.

Studies show that when women are mobilized, all of society benefits. Their families are healthier, more children go to school, agricultural productivity improves, and incomes increase. In short, communities become more resilient.

At The Hunger Project, we firmly believe that empowered women are key change agents to achieving the end of hunger and poverty. Wherever we work, our programs aim to mobilize women and build their capacity.

By providing women farmers easy access to credit, adequate training and instilling in them the importance of saving, our Microfinance Program enables women to engage in income-generating activities to increase their incomes and invest in their families and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Hunger is not just about food, it is inextricably linked to a nexus of issues including: economic equality, health, education, social justice, the rights of women and girls and climate change. To sustainably end hunger, communities, NGOs and government at all levels must holistically address the many facets that perpetuate conditions of hunger.

THP is spearheading a vibrant, inter-organizational gender-focused advocacy movement called The Movement for Community-led Development (MCLD).

More than 16 million are actively enrolled in their own development through partnership with The Hunger Project, successfully working collectively toward the goal of declaring sustainable self-reliance and taking complete ownership of local resources and development.

With more financial resources and partner organizations declaring a commitment to de-centralizing development through MCLD, THP can both elevate the visibility of community-led development and continue to deepen and expand programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of women participating in leadership training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Women's Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Global numbers

Estimated number of people our programs reached

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Global numbers

Number of participants in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) community meetings, workshops, and campaigns

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Global numbers

Number of participants in income generating and skills workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Global numbers

Number of participants in trained in climate adaptation workshops across Africa

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Epicenter Strategy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number of general community members and animators trained in climate adaptation across Africa.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have recognized these ten principles as being fundamental to The Hunger Project. We challenge ourselves to ensure that each strategy builds on these principles.

Human Dignity. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights, including the right to food, health, work, education. The inherent nature of every person is creative, resourceful, self-reliant, responsible and productive. We must not treat people living in conditions of hunger as beneficiaries, which can crush dignity, but rather as the key resource for ending hunger.

Gender Equality. An essential part of ending hunger must be to cause society-wide change towards gender equality. Women bear the major responsibility for meeting basic needs, yet are systematically denied the resources, freedom of action and voice in decision-making to fulfill that responsibility.

Empowerment. In the face of social suppression, focused and sustained action is required to awaken people to the possibility of self-reliance, to build confidence, and to organize communities to take charge of their own development.

Leverage. Ending chronic hunger requires action that catalyzes large-scale systemic change. We must regularly step back — assess our impact within the evolving social/political/economic environment — and launch the highest leverage actions we can to meet this challenge.

Interconnectedness. Our actions are shaped by, and affect, all other people and our natural environment. Hunger and poverty are not problems of one country or another but are global issues. We must solve them not as “donors and recipients” but as global citizens, working as coequal partners in a common front to end hunger.

Sustainability. Solutions to ending hunger must be sustainable locally, socially, economically and environmentally.

Social Transformation. People’s self-reliance is suppressed by conditions such as corruption, armed conflict, racism and the subjugation of women. These are all rooted in an age-old and nearly universal patriarchal mindset that must be transformed as part of a fundamental shift in the way society is organized.

Holistic Approach. Hunger is inextricably linked to a nexus of issues including decent work, health, education, environmental sustainability and social justice. Only in solving these together will any of them be solved on a sustainable basis.

Decentralization. Individual and community ownership of local development is critical. Actions are most successful if decisions are made close to the people. This requires effective national and local government working in partnership with the people.

Transformative Leadership. Ending hunger requires a new kind of leadership: not top-down, authority-based leadership, but leadership that awakens people to their own power — leadership “with” people rather than leadership “over” people.

In sum, world hunger can be ended, but not by merely doing more of the same. Ending hunger requires principles consistent with our shared humanity.

Our programs in over 12,000 communities throughout Africa, South Asia and Latin America are based on an innovative, holistic approach, which empowers women and men living in rural villages to become the agents of their own development and make sustainable progress in overcoming hunger and poverty.

While adapted to meet local challenges and opportunities wherever we work, all our programs have at their foundation these three essential elements:

1. Empowering women as key change agents
2. Mobilizing communities for self-reliant action
3. Fostering effective partnerships with local government

One of our first activities is a Vision, Commitment and Action Workshop, which serve as the foundation of our work, inspiring individuals to move from “I can't" to “I can" to “We can." Through participation in our training, people set a vision for their communities, and then lay out the actions they will take to achieve that vision. Read more about our innovative approach to ending hunger and poverty. Visit www.thp.org

350+ staff indigenous to the countries where we work.
Almost 500,000 volunteers globally
A state of the art Monitoring and Evaluation system designed in partnership with our community partners
Partnerships with local governments and institutions
Fundraising strategies that inspire both — our investors (donors) and community partners
Spearheading a vibrant, inter-organizational gender-focused advocacy movement called The Movement for Community-led Development

More than 16 million are actively enrolled in their own development through partnership with The Hunger Project, successfully working collectively toward the goal of declaring sustainable self-reliance and taking complete ownership of local resources and development.

With more financial resources and partner organizations declaring a commitment to de-centralizing development through the Movement for Community-led Development, THP can both elevate the visibility of community-led development and continue to deepen and expand programs in the communities in which we work. A powerful global network and proof of concept within self-reliant communities will lead to stronger government partnerships, causing further breakthroughs in ending hunger at both local and national levels.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.82

Average of 4.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.4

Average of 4.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

36%

Average of 17% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $158,754 $58,650 $894,931 $623,868 $442,253
As % of expenses 1.0% 0.3% 5.4% 3.8% 2.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$9,033 -$157,582 $644,143 $464,541 $333,743
As % of expenses -0.1% -0.9% 3.8% 2.8% 1.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $15,571,147 $17,635,171 $19,761,984 $18,515,873 $18,226,528
Total revenue, % change over prior year -12.8% 13.3% 12.1% -6.3% -1.6%
Program services revenue 0.7% 1.9% 1.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.9% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.1% 1.2%
All other grants and contributions 95.1% 94.3% 97.1% 94.4% 98.3%
Other revenue 2.3% 3.8% 1.7% 1.5% 0.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $15,513,175 $17,792,008 $16,484,568 $16,347,072 $17,501,078
Total expenses, % change over prior year -5.6% 14.7% -7.3% -0.8% 7.1%
Personnel 33.2% 37.5% 35.1% 40.4% 39.8%
Professional fees 10.8% 9.5% 6.9% 9.3% 7.5%
Occupancy 3.3% 2.5% 2.3% 3.9% 3.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 8.5% 12.1% 2.3% 2.3% 1.7%
All other expenses 44.3% 38.4% 53.4% 44.1% 47.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $15,680,962 $18,008,240 $16,735,356 $16,506,399 $17,609,588
One month of savings $1,292,765 $1,482,667 $1,373,714 $1,362,256 $1,458,423
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $660,967 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $339,342 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $16,973,727 $19,830,249 $18,109,070 $18,529,622 $19,068,011

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.6 2.4 4.0 4.6 5.4
Months of cash and investments 6.7 4.3 6.0 6.1 6.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.2 3.5 4.4 4.8 4.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $5,910,184 $3,540,919 $5,546,428 $6,330,805 $7,926,387
Investments $2,806,451 $2,782,324 $2,736,429 $1,930,472 $1,955,453
Receivables $6,377,633 $8,932,293 $8,922,436 $9,252,914 $8,459,818
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,388,183 $2,563,379 $2,518,357 $2,217,267 $1,525,690
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 71.3% 68.4% 73.1% 73.2% 83.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 16.8% 19.1% 16.2% 10.0% 12.7%
Unrestricted net assets $6,172,596 $6,015,014 $6,659,157 $7,123,698 $7,457,441
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $7,758,329 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $7,758,329 $7,520,655 $8,717,603 $9,489,671 $9,384,420
Total net assets $13,930,925 $13,535,669 $15,376,760 $16,613,369 $16,841,861

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Tim Prewitt

Tim Prewitt is an international executive with more than 20 years of experience in the field of policy-driven, community-led international development. He joined The Hunger Project as President and CEO on February 1, 2021. Previously, Tim served as CEO of International Development Enterprises (iDE) and, prior to joining iDE, worked in Nigeria with farmers, the private sector and the Nigerian government to increase farm yields and income, leading to a UN World Business Development Award. Tim has lived and worked in more than 30 countries, including in Hunger Project Program Countries such as India, Bangladesh, Malawi, Zambia, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Ghana, Burkina Faso and Uganda. He is a highly regarded speaker on agriculture, poverty and economic development, and has spoken at the World Economic Forum, Clinton Global Initiative and World Food Prize. He is also the author of the forthcoming book, Table for Ten Billion, which chronicles efforts around the world to feed our planet.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Global Hunger Project dba The Hunger Project

Board of directors
as of 10/10/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Sheree Stomberg

Global Head, Citi Shared Services and the Citi Service Center Network

Term: 2020 -

Prof. Amartya Sen

The Hunger Project

Sheree S. Stomberg

The Hunger Project

Charles Deull

The Hunger Project

Queen Noor of Jordan

The Hunger Project

M.S. Swaminathan

The Hunger Project

Joan Holmes

The Hunger Project

Steve Sherwood

The Hunger Project

Mirna Cunningham Kain

The Hunger Project

Syeda Hameed

The Hunger Project

Bineta Diop

The Hunger Project

Neera Nundy

The Hunger Project

Roger Massy-Greene

The Hunger Project

Koosum Kalyan

The Hunger Project

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser