PLATINUM2023

Center for Global Health Innovation

CGHI exists to advance global health equity by promoting and facilitating collaboration to drive impactful innovation.

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.cghi.org
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Center for Global Health Innovation

EIN: 58-1849665


Mission

The Center for Global Health Innovation brings together diverse Global Health, Health Technology, and Life Sciences entities to collaborate, innovate and activate solutions to enhance human health outcomes around the world. At its core, CGHI will orchestrate programs that promote cross-discipline cooperation to strengthen capabilities, accelerate problem solving and respond to global health crises.

Ruling year info

1989

President & Ceo

Maria Thacker-Goethe

Main address

999 Peachtree St NE Ste 1800

Atlanta, GA 30309 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Georgia Biomedical Partnership Inc

EIN

58-1849665

Subject area info

STEM education

Public health

Biomedicine

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

Health

NTEE code info

Biomedicine, Bioengineering (G92)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Center for Global Health Innovation identifies, champions and addresses the health problems we face in our world that need the most attention. These are big challenges that no one person, no one organization can solve alone.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education & Workforce Development

CGHI carries out initiatives in education and workforce development to accelerate the alignment of Georgia’s current and future workforce with the needs of its Life Sciences Industry. The workforce development programming focuses on connecting education and career pathway development with Georgia’s Work Ready Program, and places it in an industry-focused context led by an industry network. Activities include career awareness programs, curricula development and implementation, teacher trainings, a mentoring program, solutions design, and execution. With support from the state of Georgia, CGHI launched the first teacher training program in the country specific to STEM education serving 30 counties in rural Georgia. 233 teachers were trained, impacting nearly 38,000 students (75% in Title 1 Schools). CGHI also operates an Equipment Depot to support STEM education by providing free STEM supplies and equipment to classrooms throughout the state.

Population(s) Served

Since its formation in early 2020, CGHI’s Office of Health Equity and Crisis Coordination (OHECC) has led private-public partnerships and developed public health technology assets during our nation’s largest public health crisis in over a century. Programs include Back2School, the Workshop Action Coalition, and the COVID Vaccine and Information Equity Demand (COVIED) program. These programs have served over 5000 students in the Atlanta area, over 50 houses of worship of various faiths throughout the country, and have served to increase access to the latest and most effective vaccine information for groups with increased rates of vaccine hesitancy across the country. OHECC has also deployed a free online database (PAVE) across all fifty states to aid in optimizing vaccine allocation. OHECC is currently leading a HRSA-funded to train and deploy over 120 community health workers across seven states to increase trust and combat vaccine hesitancy in high-risk communities.

Population(s) Served

CGHI works to advance the growth of Georgia’s life sciences industry and foster strategic partnerships that can create a healthier world and strengthen economic development in the region. Initiatives and programs include public policy information forums, executive roundtables, educational panels on industry trends and innovations, capital forums, and entrepreneurial trainings. The annual conference is largest life sciences conference in the southeast and showcases the most advanced life science research and product developments not only in biomedicine and medical devices, but also in agriculture and bioenergy. Meetings and events are open to company executives, university administrators and scientists, government leaders, investors and public policy experts. This summit, along with many other meetings, panel discussions, seminars and other events throughout the year, provides a network for the exchange of ideas, information, and opportunities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of touchpoints around vaccine awareness and education in at-risk communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Health Equity and Crisis Coordination

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Fostering collaboration to solve public health problems in order to promote a healthier, more equitable society. The Center for Global Health Innovation is committed to solving the health and societal inequities highlighted by the pandemic and to ensure communities across the globe are better able to meet the needs of the next global health crisis.

Building Trust: Trust enables understanding, drives collaboration, and fuels innovation. Without it, the best ideas fail. With it, anything is possible. We are building trust by fostering personal relationships among historically fragmented sectors, breaking down barriers to collaboration, extending those relationships authentically into community, and engaging community members directly to design and deliver health solutions that work.

The Center for Global Health Innovation’s District: The Innovation District will be a physical hub of community, discovery, and invention for Georgia’s global health, health technology, and life sciences sectors. Georgia is home to the largest and most impactful life sciences and global public health entities in the world, which are major economic drivers in our state.

Workforce Development: K-12 Teacher training and free science equipment for Title 1 schools
Address workforce shortages limiting our research universities and industry from health innovation progress
1st of its kind life sciences career training dedicated to minority representation in science workforce

Economic Development: Provide sorely needed research labs and collaborative workspace currently absent from Atlanta’s ecosystem

Health Equity: 70,000 of Atlanta’s most underserved citizens provided with health education and access to care. 5,000+ students served across KIPP Atlanta; K-12.

By organizing, accelerating and supporting talented people and successful companies to innovate around these problems, The Center works to improve health outcomes for every community, every individual around the globe. And by focusing on equity in the process, these life-saving innovations create economic impact, build new industries, create more jobs, and open new global marketplaces to further empower community success.

Only through rigorous, strategic and active collaboration, designed to deliver sustainable and profitable innovations, will humanity overcome the Global Health challenges we face.

Since its formation in early 2020, CGHI’s Office of Health Equity and Crisis Coordination (OHECC) has led private-public partnerships and developed public health technology assets during our nation’s largest public health crisis in over a century. Programs include Back2School, the Workshop Action Coalition, and the COVID Vaccine and Information Equity Demand (COVIED) program. These programs have served over 5000 students in the Atlanta area, over 50 houses of worship of various faiths throughout the country, and have served to increase access to the latest and most effective vaccine information for groups with increased rates of vaccine hesitancy across the country. OHECC has also deployed a free online database (PAVE) across all fifty states to aid in optimizing vaccine allocation. OHECC is currently leading a HRSA-funded to train and deploy over 120 community health workers across seven states to increase trust and combat vaccine hesitancy in high-risk communities.

CGHI carries out initiatives in education and workforce development to accelerate the alignment of Georgia’s current and future workforce with the needs of its Life Sciences Industry. The workforce development programming focuses on connecting education and career pathway development with Georgia’s Work Ready Program, and places it in an industry-focused context led by an industry network. Activities include career awareness programs, curricula development and implementation, teacher trainings, a mentoring program, solutions design, and execution. With support from the state of Georgia, CGHI launched the first teacher training program in the country specific to STEM education serving 30 counties in rural Georgia. 233 teachers were trained, impacting nearly 38,000 students (75% in Title 1 Schools). CGHI also operates an Equipment Depot to support STEM education by providing free STEM supplies and equipment to classrooms throughout the state, with over $280,000 of supplies and equipment donated in 2021 for distribution to teachers and school. CGHI is leading an initiative funded by NSF to operate and scale a Biotechnician Assistant Credentialing Exam (BACE) program. Global Health programming is focused on education and community awareness of global health partners and their activities, supporting and advising the Women in Global Health chapter, and the Becoming Better Ancestors project which focuses on lessons learned from past successes in disease eradication and how society can better respond to future health crises. This initiative will result in an educational video series to be globally distributed in 2022.

CGHI works to advance the growth of Georgia’s life sciences industry to foster strategic partnerships that can create a healthier world and strengthen economic development in the region. Initiatives and programs include public policy information forums, executive roundtables, educational panels on industry trends and innovations, capital forums, and entrepreneurial trainings.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Center for Global Health Innovation
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2021 A-133 Single Audit 2021 2021 Audited Financial Statements 2020 2020 Audited Financial Statement
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.04

Average of 0.88 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.9

Average of 1.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Center for Global Health Innovation

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Center for Global Health Innovation

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Center for Global Health Innovation

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Center for Global Health Innovation’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $95,981 -$142,131 $721,823 $24,096 -$4,413,553
As % of expenses 10.3% -12.6% 29.0% 0.4% -26.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $95,981 -$142,131 $691,861 -$125,773 -$4,637,922
As % of expenses 10.3% -12.6% 27.5% -2.0% -27.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,024,272 $985,550 $3,462,171 $6,063,430 $11,925,707
Total revenue, % change over prior year 7.0% -3.8% 251.3% 75.1% 96.7%
Program services revenue 20.6% 25.2% 23.9% 13.3% 8.1%
Membership dues 35.1% 19.7% 4.2% 3.0% 0.8%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 3.5% 0.5% 2.1% 56.1% 81.7%
All other grants and contributions 40.7% 54.6% 69.8% 27.6% 9.4%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $928,291 $1,127,681 $2,485,250 $6,085,552 $16,499,809
Total expenses, % change over prior year -1.0% 21.5% 120.4% 144.9% 171.1%
Personnel 53.6% 32.1% 21.8% 10.3% 7.3%
Professional fees 8.5% 12.6% 46.8% 70.9% 17.4%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 1.3% 8.0% 27.5%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.9% 0.4%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 37.8% 55.2% 30.1% 10.1% 47.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $928,291 $1,127,681 $2,515,212 $6,235,421 $16,724,178
One month of savings $77,358 $93,973 $207,104 $507,129 $1,374,984
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $426,515 $35,264,654 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,005,649 $1,221,654 $3,148,831 $42,007,204 $18,099,162

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.3 0.9 3.5 3.1 0.9
Months of cash and investments 1.3 0.9 3.5 3.1 0.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.2 -0.5 1.6 -68.8 -3.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $98,010 $82,823 $718,941 $1,574,114 $1,172,057
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $89,014 $100 $93,290 $168,933 $280,600
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $34,788 $34,788 $465,577 $35,730,232 $853,195
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 14.8% 0.6% 4.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 50.5% 159.7% 19.2% 97.6% 110.7%
Unrestricted net assets $92,624 -$49,507 $642,354 $516,581 -$4,121,341
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $431,050 $384,832 $224,283
Total net assets $92,624 -$49,507 $1,073,404 $901,413 -$3,897,058

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President & Ceo

Maria Thacker-Goethe

Maria Thacker-Goethe has more than 13 years of experience in non-profit management and development. She was appointed president and CEO for Georgia Bio and the Georgia BioEd Institute in February 2019. Maria has helped build the organization into one of the top state bioscience and Medtech associations through her community outreach and engagement, member development, and leadership on various special projects and programs to increase community connections and resources. Additionally, she had been responsible for conceiving, developing, and executing a comprehensive internal and external communications strategy. Maria received her Master in Public Health in health education/communication, and maternal and child health from Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Sweet Briar College.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Center for Global Health Innovation

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Center for Global Health Innovation

Board of directors
as of 02/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Russell Medford

Joey Bakal

Deloitte

Sherri Berger

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Deb Bruner

Emory University

Clark Dean

Transwestern

Patricia Fritz

UCB, Inc.

Chaarles Fogelgren

Quest Diagnostics

Shay Foley

Alcon

David Hartnett

Metro Atlanta Chamber

Russell Medford

Covanos

Anil Menon

Sharecare

Judy Monroe

CDC Foundation

Mike Pasilla

J.P. Morgan (former)

Charles Redding

Medshare

Gary Reedy

American Cancer Society (former)

David Ross

The Task Force for Global Health

Maria Thacker-Goethe

Center for Global Health Innovation

Louis Sullivan

Morehouse School of Medicine

Bill Warren

Eversheds Sutherland

Nicky Gouveia Wilmington

Global 1 Connect

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/6/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/06/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.