PLATINUM2023

HOPE Atlanta

aka HOPE Atlanta   |   Atlanta, GA   |  www.hopeatlanta.org
GuideStar Charity Check

HOPE Atlanta

EIN: 58-0566247


Mission

Our mission is to prevent and end homelessness by empowering clients to achieve stability and self-sufficiency. Founded in 1900 as part of the Travelers Aid Movement, HOPE Atlanta is one of the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive providers of housing services to low-income, vulnerable people in the greater Atlanta area. The organization offers prevention services, street outreach, emergency shelter solutions, rapid re-housing and permanent supportive housing with specialized programs dedicated to helping veterans and those who are HIV+ or living with AIDS. In 2021, HOPE Atlanta combined programs and operations with Action Ministries. Today, the combined organization serves approximately 7,000 people annually and provides 500,000 pounds of food.

Ruling year info

1942

Chief Executive Officer

Julio Carrillo

Main address

458 Ponce de Leon Ave NE Building B, Terrace Level

Atlanta, GA 30308 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-0566247

Subject area info

Human services

Basic and emergency aid

Housing for the homeless

Homeless services

Travelers' aid

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

People with HIV/AIDS

Veterans

NTEE code info

Travelers' Aid (P61)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Housing Expense Reduction Support, Rent Assistance (L82)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Atlanta, housing prices have risen more than twice as fast as incomes. As a result, the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s annual “Out of Reach” study finds that a minimum wage worker in Georgia would have to work 116 hours/week, earning $43,618, to be able to afford a two-bedroom apartment. According to the coalition, only about 10% of all of Atlanta’s apartments are affordable to low-income workers. The shortage of affordable housing results in an excessive cost burden of housing for low-income workers. This means that the costs of housing (including utilities) are more than 30% of a family’s take-home pay. To pay these costs, workers are often forced to go without other necessities. Using a Housing First Model, the overall goal of HOPE Atlanta is to assist those who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness and living in subsistence to move to stability and self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

The permanent supportive housing (PSH) program provides housing for people with mental and/or physical disabilities at multiple community-based sites in the greater Atlanta area including Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett and other surrounding counties. The program provides case management and other supportive services. It promotes self-sufficiency, and clients are connected to community partners to access other beneficial services including HOPE Atlanta's hunger relief services.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Homeless people

The Special Needs Housing Program (SNHP) assists people living with HIV/AIDS with housing, hunger, and self-sufficiency in a safe and secure environment. It provides emergency services, crisis intervention, and permanent housing to people living with HIV/AIDS. Clients are connected to the care services they need including medical, mental health, substance abuse treatment, hunger relief, and other supportive services through case management. The program also focuses on income generation through job readiness and placement and efforts to overcome barriers to self-sufficiency. HOPE Atlanta's serves as the central intake coordinator for all agencies participating in the HOPWA program in the greater Atlanta area and surrounding counties.

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Homeless people

The Outreach Program assists unsheltered people by engaging them where they are, ensuring they have access to any treatment they need for physical or mental illnesses like substance use disorder, and placing them in housing coupled with case management. The team builds trust by repeatedly talking with people sleeping on the streets, in parks, and in other places not meant for human habitation and inviting them to enroll in HOPE Atlanta’s housing programs. In particular, the program targets the chronically homeless and those suffering from severe mental illness in Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett, and Hall Counties.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

The Supportive Services for Veterans and their Families (SSVF) program began in 2012 in 13 metro Atlanta counties and has expanded to 28 counties. It provides rapid re-housing and homelessness prevention assistance to veteran households. SSVF is primarily funded by Veterans Affairs grants to provide supportive services to extremely low or very low-income veterans and veterans with families residing in or transitioning to permanent housing. Veterans served by the program are also eligible for HOPE Atlanta hunger rellief assistance.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Homeless people

The reunification program assists homeless residents and stranded travelers who need transportation assistance to return to their home communities and/or support systems when remaining in the Atlanta area is not in their best interest. HOPE provides travel accommodations to verified locations where clients’ families and loved ones are present to meet them.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Refugees and displaced people
Internally displaced people

The Homeless Prevent and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) provides financial and other assistance and case management to clients experiencing or at risk of homelessness in the greater Atlanta area including Fulton, DeKalb, Cobb, Gwinnett, and surrounding counties. Some clients served have been given eviction notices and need help in the form of past due rent to resolve a temporary financial crisis. Other clients are homeless and in need of temporary support and assistance to move beyond their current crisis. This may include assistance with security deposits, moving assistance, temporary rental support, food support, and referrals to other services to assist them with stability.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

HOPE Atlanta addresses food insecurity through the distribution of food boxes to its housing clients and through a community outreach center operated since 1984 from our 458 Ponce de Leon Ave location as a Women's Community Kitchen. The Women's Community Kitchen (WCK) in Atlanta provides hot meals three days each week and seeks to expand to five days/week and to serving community men in 2024. Wrap-around services in conjunction with local community partners are provided at the kitchen and seasonal items (such as blankets or coats) as well as staples such as hygiene kits are distributed to those in need.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Families, Homeless people

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The total number served by one of our programs in FY 2107 was 4584. 1325 represents the number of individual or heads of household we were able to get stably housed through one of our programs.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans, People with HIV/AIDS

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of veterans and their families provided case management, eviction prevention, and rapid re-housing assistance to help remain housed or get off the streets and into stable housing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Supportive Services for Veterans and their Families (SSVF)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless persons living w/HIV/AIDS provided w/a full continuum of housing focused services including intensive case management, emergency lodging, transitional housing, & permanent support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, People with HIV/AIDS

Related Program

Special Needs Housing Program - Housing Support for People who are HIV+

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of victims of domestic violence avoid homelessness and find safe haven

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Reunification

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households who were provided with safe, stable, and affordable housing through our transitional, permanent, and supportive housing programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households received financial assistance and case management to move out of homelessness and into their own homes (Rapid Re-Housing), or to avoid eviction (Prevention)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Reunification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households provided with temporary emergency lodging that allowed families and individuals to get off the streets and begin to work toward self-sufficiency and stable housing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Reunification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HOPE Atlanta aims to prevent and end homelessness and hunger in Georgia by providing support and services to allow people to move toward economic stability. Through outreach programs throughout the city, we engage people experiencing homelessness where they are. We follow the evidence-based Housing First practice, recognizing that safe and stable housing is a fundamental need of all we serve. We aim to help those we serve through food distribution programs so that low-income Georgians are not forced to choose between their housing and hunger needs.

HOPE Atlanta's Strategic Plan for the next five years identifies 4 strategies for accomplishing our mission of preventing and ending homelessness:

I. The HOPE Atlanta Way: We will serve as a seamless bridge to self-sufficiency for our clients by ensuring basic needs are met; assisting clients to navigate community resources to build their resiliency; and investing in HOPE’s capacity as a behavioral healthcare provider, developing in-house behavioral health services for those we serve.

II. Place-Based Transformation: We will implement neighborhood and site focused initiatives that harness local assets, insights, and partnerships to promote economic mobility and self-sufficiency for those experiencing housing insecurity.

III. People-Focused: We will champion a culture where clients progress from survival to self-sufficiency and team members achieve balanced well-being, reflecting our unwavering commitment to the holistic growth of our community.

IV. Operational Excellence: Through a steadfast commitment to continuous improvement, harnessing best practices, and adopting innovative approaches to ensure sustained organizational impact, we will set the standard for operational excellence.

HOPE Atlanta has assisted over one million individuals since 1900. HOPE Atlanta is the oldest and longest serving homelessness program in the Atlanta area. The staff has a tremendous amount of experience in this field, and some members are former clients who can relate to current clients, contributing lived experience.

The organization works in and through the Atlanta, Fulton County, and Dekalb County Continuums of Care. In addition, through the "Balance of State" Continuum of Care, HOPE Atlanta serves the people of Gwinnett County as well. Our Special Needs Housing Program and our Veterans Services programs serve a broader geographic footprint, extending support to more than two dozen counties surrounding Atlanta.
 
In recognition of the agency's expertise, HOPE receives funding from local, state, and federal government agencies and a variety of private sources.

The organization distinguishes itself among the crowded field of homelessness service providers through its accreditation by CARF International, an independent review body. The CARF accreditation signifies HOPE Atlanta’s adherence to a specific set of best practices in service delivery and business processes that demonstrate a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement.

As one of the oldest and most respected social service agencies in metro Atlanta, HOPE Atlanta has assisted over one million individuals since 1900.

The organization is a leader in providing services to the area's veterans. In 1941, the Travelers Aid movement with which the organization was affiliated accepted the call of President Franklin Roosevelt to assist troops in transit, thus becoming part of the original United Service Organization (U.S.O.). Honoring those roots, the organization continues to work closely with the Veterans Administration and to serve a large number of veterans annually. Further, HOPE Atlanta also signed on to President Obama's initiative to end veteran homelessness nationwide and helped make Atlanta one of the first cities to achieve the initiative's goals.

Through street outreach teams that ride the MARTA rails, go into the Hartsfield International Airport, and visit city encampments, the organization has significantly contributed to reducing the number of people experiencing chronic homelessness in the metro area as well.

HOPE will continue to support people experiencing and at risk of homelessness through outreach and housing coupled with best-in-class intensive case management until the vision of transforming lives and communities by ending homelessness is realized.

Financials

HOPE Atlanta
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.86

Average of 1.03 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.3

Average of 0.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 19% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

HOPE Atlanta

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HOPE Atlanta

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HOPE Atlanta

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of HOPE Atlanta’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $13,598 $281,331 $775,783 -$288,944 $2,621,153
As % of expenses 0.2% 3.2% 7.4% -2.4% 14.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$24,990 $236,873 $733,110 -$330,592 $2,579,317
As % of expenses -0.3% 2.7% 6.9% -2.7% 13.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $7,483,546 $8,972,519 $11,214,150 $11,963,095 $21,344,786
Total revenue, % change over prior year -1.5% 19.9% 25.0% 6.7% 78.4%
Program services revenue 4.1% 2.9% 2.3% 1.6% 0.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 79.4% 82.0% 81.7% 82.4% 69.4%
All other grants and contributions 16.5% 14.6% 14.9% 15.8% 29.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.5% 1.1% 0.1% 0.6%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $7,341,834 $8,735,966 $10,544,638 $12,249,082 $18,719,406
Total expenses, % change over prior year -1.5% 19.0% 20.7% 16.2% 52.8%
Personnel 46.2% 42.3% 39.2% 38.1% 34.5%
Professional fees 3.1% 3.9% 3.1% 2.3% 5.2%
Occupancy 2.5% 2.3% 2.1% 1.8% 1.5%
Interest 0.1% 0.1% 0.2% 0.3% 0.3%
Pass-through 42.7% 46.2% 50.8% 52.0% 54.7%
All other expenses 5.4% 5.1% 4.5% 5.5% 3.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total expenses (after depreciation) $7,380,422 $8,780,424 $10,587,311 $12,290,730 $18,761,242
One month of savings $611,820 $727,997 $878,720 $1,020,757 $1,559,951
Debt principal payment $17,710 $18,796 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $42,137 $0 $0 $0 $204,780
Total full costs (estimated) $8,052,089 $9,527,217 $11,466,031 $13,311,487 $20,525,973

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Months of cash 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.8 0.3
Months of cash and investments 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.8 1.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.1 0.5 1.3 0.8 2.2
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Cash $289,248 $424,514 $339,111 $829,451 $396,089
Investments $1,062 $3,837 $2,380 $24,098 $1,517,839
Receivables $772,788 $750,880 $2,240,557 $2,792,190 $4,820,233
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $488,349 $442,988 $329,098 $336,850 $540,684
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 59.8% 61.4% 61.2% 72.4% 52.7%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 74.0% 61.8% 57.8% 78.1% 51.6%
Unrestricted net assets $151,036 $424,996 $1,158,106 $827,514 $3,406,831
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $106,218 $0 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $106,218 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $339,159 $531,214 $1,158,106 $827,514 $3,406,831

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Material data errors Yes No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Julio Carrillo

Julio Carrillo has more than 17 years of nonpofit management experience and is passionate about bringing strategic business thinking to Georgia’s nonprofit sector and driving measurable impact for organizations addressing issues that affect the stability and success of at-risk youth and families in low-opportunity communities. Julio most recently served as Chief Operating Officer for Families First, an Atlanta nonprofit that provides a spectrum of services for youth, individuals and families and has held executive leadership positions at TechBridge and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta. Julio has a strong track record as a change-maker and leader in Metro Atlanta. He was selected to serve on the Leadership Atlanta Board of Directors, twice named one of Atlanta magazine’s “Most Powerful Leaders,” recognized as one of 50 Most Influential Latinos in Georgia and appointed to the Forbes Nonprofit Coun

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

HOPE Atlanta

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

HOPE Atlanta

Board of directors
as of 11/09/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Rocky Atkins

Rocky Atkins

City of Atlanta (ret.)

Alex Idichandy

Wells Fargo

Ellen Brooks

PwC

Kenneth Abele

Ernst & Young

Laura Diesley

Walker Diesley Strategic Consulting

Jerry Getant

Berkadia

Bob Greene

Robert Kadoori

CBRE

Angela Kolar

Colonial Pipeline

Ashley Luft

Home Depot

Jaza Marina

Kaiser Permanente

Cheryl Naja

Alston & Bird

Karthik Ramasamy

Georgia-Pacific

Stephanie Small

INROADS

Martina Jimenez Sperry

JPMorgan Chase

Rhonda Taylor

Consultant

Matt Westmoreland

City of Atlanta

Qaadirah Abdur-Rahim

BlackRock

Sarah Cash

Georgia Power Company

Robert Cotes

Emory School of Medicine

Alexis Nicole White

Genuine Parts

Cesar Wurm

IHG

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/31/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.