PLATINUM2023

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

For Every Fish - For Every Angler - For Every Water - For Over 80 Years

aka I.G.F.A.   |   Dania Beach, FL   |  www.igfa.org
GuideStar Charity Check

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

EIN: 23-7231048


Mission

The IGFA is a nonprofit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and the promotion of responsible, ethical angling practices through science, education, rulemaking, record keeping, and recognition of outstanding accomplishments in the field of angling.

Ruling year info

1976

President

Mr. Jason Schratwieser

Main address

300 Gulf Stream Way

Dania Beach, FL 33004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7231048

Subject area info

Wildlife biodiversity

Aquatic wildlife protection

Population served info

Children

Work status and occupations

NTEE code info

Fisheries (D33)

Natural History, Natural Science Museums (A56)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Around the world, natural habitats and the species essential to their health and function are disappearing at an alarming rate. Fish, our aquatic system’s most familiar residents, are especially imperiled due to circumstances like overexploitation and habitat loss. While many species are known for being sources of food, driving our economies, and supporting our cultures; fish are also important to the balance of our oceans, rivers, lakes, and streams. Playing a critical role, fish are an invaluable part of the aquatic ecosystem. They do everything from transfer energy up and down the food chain, to facilitating ecosystem processes. To say that fish are essential to aquatic habitats is an understatement; they are a key biological resource critical to our planet. As a conservation-based recreational angling organization, the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) works diligently to ensure that the game fish we revere, and the habitats they call home, are preserved for the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

IGFA Research, Science and Education

International Game Fish Association

Around the world, natural habitats and the species essential to their health and function are disappearing at an alarming rate. Fish, our aquatic system’s most familiar residents, are especially imperiled due to circumstances like overexploitation and habitat loss. While many species are known for being sources of food, driving our economies, and supporting our cultures; fish are also important to the balance of our oceans, rivers, lakes, and streams. Playing a critical role, fish are an invaluable part of the aquatic ecosystem. They do everything from transfer energy up and down the food chain, to facilitating ecosystem processes. To say that fish are essential to aquatic habitats is an understatement; they are a key biological resource critical to our planet. As a conservation-based recreational angling organization, the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) works diligently to ensure that the game fish we revere, and the habitats they call home, are preserved for future generations.

IGFA Conservation Programs
Billfish Conservation. The IGFA Great Marlin Race is our renowned “citizen-science” collaboration with Stanford University that pairs recreational anglers with satellite tag technology to learn more about the basic biology of billfish and how they utilize their open ocean habitat.
Forage Fish Conservation. The IGFA serves as the lead organization for the Florida Forage Fish Coalition, which studies and advocates for forage fish (bait fish) species conservation.
Golden Dorado Research Initiative. In partnership with the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the initiative aims to ascertain species population structure and vulnerability and promote conservation, while maximizing regional economic gain through a sustainable recreational fishery in South America.
Everglades Restoration. The IGFA supports critical projects that help to restore the Florida Everglades, fix local water quality issues, and prevent further damage to the wetland’s fisheries.
Fisheries Policy & Advocacy. The IGFA advocates for socially responsible and scientifically credible fish conservation and promotes science-based policy that benefits anglers and fish.

IGFA Education Programs
Passports to Fishing. Known for its “fishing clinics in a box” and our Teach 100,000 Kids to Fish initiative, the Passports to Fishing program is the IGFA’s signature hands-on and interactive method of teaching youth around the world the basics of fishing.
Online Angling Learning Courses. Available to the public at no charge, the courses provide young and/or novice anglers a strong foundation of knowledge, giving them the confidence to get out and go fishing in a responsible and ethical way. Home to our new Fishing Florida: Virtual Field Trips project.
Youth Education Partnerships. The IGFA is proud to partner with respected leaders in youth angling education whose curriculum and programs align with our mission and vision.
School of Sportfishing. From novice anglers to seasoned professionals, the IGFA’s School of Sportfishing Seminars offer expert fishing advice that will benefit anglers of all experience and skill levels.

Worldwide Anglers Relief Fund (WARF)
Provides financial support to charter captains, guides, and crew in the wake of major natural disasters.

IGFA Collaborative Initiatives

There are an increasing number of collaborative initiatives that carry out conservation research and education in locations of environmental concern. These partnerships play a crucial role in conservation by uncovering new knowledge about species and their habitats, as well as, raising awareness through their education, outreach, and advocacy efforts. At the IGFA, collaborative initiatives are the cornerstone of our research

efforts; most notable is our partnership with Stanford University for the IGFA Great Marlin Race, and our partnership with the University of Massachusetts Amherst for the Golden Dorado Research Initiative.

IGFA Great Marlin Race Partner - Stanford University
As the oldest marine laboratory on the west coast - and the third oldest in the U.S - the Hopkins Marine Station at Stanford University is the home of SeaNet, the Miller Library, The David Epel Microscopy Center, the Marine Life Observatory, and Dr. Barbara Block & The Block Lab. Research at Hopkins Marine Station addresses important questions in marine biology at scales ranging from DNA to ecosystems, at locations from laboratories to field sites around the world. The vast array of research topics are divided into three themes: 1) How plants and animals’ function; this is the realm of physiology and biomechanics; 2) How organisms change as they grow, and species change as they evolve; research here is focused on development and evolution; and 3) How plants and animals interact with each other, their environment, and society; these are the subjects of ecology and conservation biology, including the broad field of population biology.

Project Lead - Barbara Block, Ph.D., Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Professor in Marine Sciences, Stanford University

Golden Dorado Research Initiative Partner - University of Massachusetts Amherst
Located within the UMass School of Earth & Sustainability, the Department of Environmental Conservation (ECo) is passionate about their mission - the stewardship of healthy and sustainable ecosystems that provide important human and community benefits - and deeply committed to training the next generation of scholars and practitioners. The ECo’s diverse focus areas includes: sustainable building and construction, natural resource ecology and management (e.g., forests, fish, wildlife, wetlands, watersheds, plants), sustainability, renewable energy, environmental governance and decision-making, global climate change, urban forestry, and conservation. The unifying focus of all these activities is on the stewardship of healthy and sustainable ecosystems that provide important human and community benefits.

Project Lead: Andy Danylchuk, Ph.D., Professor of Fish Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Project Background & Description

Healthy fisheries mean more than just abundant populations of fish - they mean food security, job opportunities, recreation, and culture for communities around the world. They also mean functioning ecosystems that are directly linked to the health of our planet. At the IGFA, conserving fish biodiversity, restoring exploited fish populations, and advocating for sustainable fishing around the world is a primary focus of our work. Two species of critical importance are billfish and golden dorado. As top-level predators, these species have profound effects throughout their ecosystems. They influence the overall structure by controlling the distribution, abundance, and diversity of their prey, thereby regulating lower species in the food chain. They also help to provide ecological stability, both by consuming prey and by altering prey behavior and habitat selection. However, as is the case with most predators, billfish and golden dorado are becoming increasingly vulnerable to a variety of anthropogenic threats. To help predict the ecological consequences, and potential future declines, the IGFA spearheads research that is vital to the fisheries management of these indispensable marine predators.

Billfish Conservation
The term billfish refers to a group of predatory fish characterized by prominent bills, or rostra, and by their large size. Billfish - sailfish, marlin, and spearfish - are highly migratory, apex predators that are found in all oceans, although they usually inhabit tropical and subtropical waters. Globally, most billfish populations are poorly studied and are in a depleted state; as such, it is vital that we learn more about the migration patterns

of these imperiled species and the oceanographic conditions that drive these patterns. By increasing our understanding of where these animals go and how they utilize their habitat, we can provide valuable information to scientists and resource managers to help ensure their long-term conservation.

IGFA Great Marlin Race
The IGFA Great Marlin Race (IGMR) is a partnership between the IGFA and Stanford University that pairs recreational anglers with cutting-edge satellite tag technology to learn more about the basic biology of billfish and how they utilize their open ocean habitat. This renowned “citizen science” global marlin tagging campaign has three primary goals: 1.) Increasing understanding of the distribution and behavior of billfish species in relation to their environment to better inform fishery management, 2.) Increasing the participation of recreational billfish anglers worldwide in electronic tagging science; and 3.) Providing free, open access billfish tag data to scientists throughout the world to be used in scientific research.

Golden Dorado Conservation
Golden dorado are a potadromous species native to Neotropical South America, including the countries of Brazil, Bolivia, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Argentina. As demand increases for this apex predator as a catch and release recreational species, so do the potential benefits for local communities and regional economies. However, little formal research has been conducted on most aspects of golden dorado, including their basic biology, ecology, and response to disturbance. Anecdotally, golden dorado appear to be facing growing anthropogenic pressures such as vulnerability to overharvest, habitat degradation and impacts to movement pathways. Considering the potential threats to their population, as well as the broader impact on regional biodiversity, it is imperative we learn more about this important species and its habitats.

Golden Dorado Research Initiative
In 2019, the IGFA partnered with the University of Massachusetts, Amherst to study the population structure of golden dorado and facilitate the adoption of best practices in fisheries management. The four-year research project targets two critical knowledge gaps that can help inform conservation and management, as well as maximize the potential economic gain local and regional communities can achieve through a sustainable recreational fishery for golden dorado. First, studying the population structure and related ‘units to conserve’ will provide valuable guidance as to the most effective policy and management frameworks for the species. Second, understanding the factors driving demand for golden dorado will help identify mismatches between economic and conservation goals. Collectively, filling the gaps related to population structure and social practices related to golden dorado will contribute greatly to the development of a sustainable recreational fishery in South America.

Population(s) Served
Age groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled in service-learning courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

IGFA Research, Science and Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Available to the public at no charge, the IGFA’s online resources offer an immersive curriculum covering angling basics and safety, aquatic and marine biology, fish anatomy, environmental stewardship.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

IGFA Research, Science and Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The IGFA created the Passports to Fishing program as our main hands-on educational program to reach youth around the world. These kits include everything needed to educate youth at a clinic.

Number of research studies that use methods that alleviate or minimize potential pain, suffering, or distress and enhance animal welfare for the animals used

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

IGFA Research, Science and Education

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Understanding where these animals go and how they utilize their habitat provides invaluable data to scientists and resource managers to help ensure long-term billfish conservation. TAGS DEPLOYED

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of the IGFA is to drive a sustainable relationship between game fish and anglers through conservation.

1. Expand the IGFA’s Conservation and Education efforts to include more work in habitat
conservation and restoration projects.
2. Leverage the IGFA’s International network (e.g., members, Representatives, Regional
Councils, etc.) to better and more efficiently deliver on the IGFA’s mission and vision.
Continue the IGFA’s reputation as a leading international authority for game fish conservation,
advocacy and research
3. Continue IGFA’s legacy as an established conservation player in the saltwater community.
4. Broaden the geographic scope of IGFA’s conservation work in both freshwater and inshore
marine locales with a focus on regions/fisheries historically underrepresented by IGFA and other
recreational angling/conservation groups
5. Continue existing and cultivate new cooperative relationships with other national and
international recreational fishing/conservation organizations, funding agencies, and academic
institutions
6. Continue IGFA’s role as a disseminator of recreational fisheries‐relevant, technical and scientific
information in a manner that recreational anglers can readily understand.
7. Continue to advocate for fisheries policies and management techniques that benefit both
recreational anglers and aquatic resources
8. Develop robust, internationally focused initiatives and programs that appeal to a broad
demographic of anglers and promote long‐term retention, education and engagement.
9. Package the IGFA’s education curriculum in a manner that allows for easy online access and physical
replication throughout the world.
10. Continue to establish mutually beneficial relationships with other national and international
organizations and institutions to further the IGFA’s education programs.
11. Continue to host premier youth‐based education and fishing opportunities in south Florida to
capitalize on the IGFA’s local presence and to determine which programs and activities are most
suitable for expansion into international locations.

CONSERVATION STRATEGY:
Identify and activate conservation activities and projects that will 1) result in productive science and fisheries conservation 2) geographically broaden IGFA’s conservation presence and 3) make IGFA more internationally relevant to members.

EDUCATION STRATEGY:
Develop initiatives and programs that promote ethical angling practices, empower the IGFA's international network, and inspire participation in recreational angling around the world.

ANGLER RECOGNITION STRATEGY:
Leverage the competitive spirit of angling to acquire, educate, inspire and activate a new generation of IGFA anglers.

To succeed in our goals, the IGFA developed fundraising strategies focusing on increasing membership, corporate partners, event revenue, and donors.

CORPORATE RELATIONS STRATEGY:
Identify significant long-term corporate partners who support the IGFA’s vision and mission and have an interest in collaborating on key IGFA programs and initiatives in the fields of conservation, education, and angler recognition.

MEMBERSHIP STRATEGY
Create a compelling marketing campaign that clearly communicates the emotional and rational benefits of joining the IGFA.

DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
Create a healthy and growing community of IGFA financial supporters to provide sustained funding for association programs and initiatives

Please review the IGFA's most recent program report to read about our progress against strategy which can be found at:

https://igfa.org/program-report/

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

International Game Fish Association, Inc.
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30
Financial documents
2021 2020-21 Financial Statements and 990 2018 IGFA 990 and Audit
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.74

Average of 0.84 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.3

Average of 1.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 10% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of International Game Fish Association, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$633,132 -$853,717 -$195,203 -$26,132 -$573,647
As % of expenses -17.0% -25.9% -7.0% -0.9% -15.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$757,776 -$976,677 -$317,030 -$143,886 -$689,857
As % of expenses -19.7% -28.6% -10.9% -4.6% -18.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,332,154 $2,451,781 $2,577,909 $3,113,785 $3,152,444
Total revenue, % change over prior year -20.7% -26.4% 5.1% 20.8% 1.2%
Program services revenue 11.2% 1.8% 6.4% 9.6% 13.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 14.9% 11.9% 12.5%
Investment income 1.0% 1.0% 0.9% 0.6% 0.7%
Government grants 8.8% 0.0% 0.0% 21.7% 6.9%
All other grants and contributions 82.0% 105.5% 84.0% 59.7% 73.9%
Other revenue -3.0% -8.3% -6.2% -3.5% -7.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,724,757 $3,296,827 $2,780,242 $3,035,876 $3,701,150
Total expenses, % change over prior year -12.6% -11.5% -15.7% 9.2% 21.9%
Personnel 41.3% 46.8% 52.4% 49.9% 43.0%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 2.0% 1.9% 2.0% 1.7% 1.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.6% 0.8% 0.3% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.9% 1.1% 1.0% 2.5%
All other expenses 56.6% 49.8% 43.7% 47.0% 53.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,849,401 $3,419,787 $2,902,069 $3,153,630 $3,817,360
One month of savings $310,396 $274,736 $231,687 $252,990 $308,429
Debt principal payment $0 $88,991 $0 $222,757 $53,713
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $4,159,797 $3,783,514 $3,133,756 $3,629,377 $4,179,502

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.9 0.1 1.6 1.7 1.3
Months of cash and investments 0.9 0.1 1.6 1.7 1.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.1 -0.5 1.5 2.0 0.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $266,019 $32,378 $375,228 $426,996 $409,175
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $146,457 $76,600 $90,572 $134,470 $125,678
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $35,633,573 $35,633,573 $35,633,573 $35,633,573 $35,633,573
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 37.6% 39.3% 40.9% 42.5% 44.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.8% 2.9% 3.4% 2.4% 2.9%
Unrestricted net assets $22,369,242 $21,392,565 $21,075,535 $20,906,065 $20,216,208
Temporarily restricted net assets $206,855 $222,047 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $965,679 $977,341 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,172,534 $1,199,388 $1,173,378 $1,505,367 $1,414,076
Total net assets $23,541,776 $22,591,953 $22,248,913 $22,411,432 $21,630,284

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Mr. Jason Schratwieser

Jason Schratweiser is President of the International Game Fish Association (IGFA), an 81-year-old world-renowned not-for-profit organization committed to the conservation of game fish and the promotion of responsible, ethical, angling practices through science, education, rule making, and record keeping. IGFA accomplishes its mission by enlisting the voice of 280 official IGFA representatives in nearly 100 countries, and members around the globe. Mr. Schratwieser began his appointment in October 2018 and is responsible for overseeing all IGFA programs and promoting gamefish conservation around the world.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

International Game Fish Association, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Roy Cunningham Jr.

William Shedd

Jose "Pepe" Anton

Terri K. Andrews

Massimo Brogna

Gary Carter

Tim Choate

Robert Cunningham

Mark Davis

Juan Pablo Gozio

Robert Kurz

Andy Mill

Chase Offield

Amanda Sabin

Ralph Vicente

Stephanie Choate- Oppenheimer

Brett Cleary

Roy Cronacher Jr.

Molly Fleming

Nassim Joaquin

Nathanial Linville

Johan Zietsman

John Barrett

Chad Moss

Sam Peters

Ilya Sherbovich

Ryan Seiders

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/17/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/17/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.