PLATINUM2023

Nome Community Center Inc

serving elders, families, and youth since 1910

Nome, AK   |  www.nomecc.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Nome Community Center Inc

EIN: 92-0039475


Mission

NOME COMMUNITY CENTER'S PRIMARY OBJECTIVES ARE TO PROVIDE HEALTH, EDUCATIONAL, AND SOCIAL SERVICES TO RESIDENTS OF THE BERING STRAITS REGION OF ALASKA.

Notes from the nonprofit

Partnerships Nome Community Center supports non-profit coordination networks and civic coalitions in Nome region and Statewide level partnerships and alliances to make its actions more rights based, effective, collaborative, and sustainable. At the community, tribe, City, Borough, Region and State level of action we practice a high commitment to State and donor regulations, coordination mechanisms among community of action groups and coalitions of advocacies allowing us to serve the best interest for all Alaskans. NCC is licensed with the state for the operation of our residential home for children. We are accredited through CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) for quality performance improvement. We are members of the Association of Homes for Children and members of several coalitions in the region. Nome Community Center has been able to establish and nurture good relationships with key donors to strengthen our grants portfolio.

Ruling year info

1972

Principal Officer

Kimberly Bishop

Main address

104 Division Street

Nome, AK 99762 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

92-0039475

Subject area info

Human services

Population served info

Families

Parents

Non-adult children

Caregivers

Ethnic and racial groups

NTEE code info

Neighborhood Center, Settlement House (P28)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Culturally-Connection: NCC is focused on offering programs and services with demonstrated community need, positive impact, and that most importantly align closely with the priorities of united Women in Faith and the legacy of serving elders, families and youth. Driven the Mission: Contributing to Nome’s safety net translates to addressing current community challenges today such as services focused on elders, youth programs, substance misuse, and housing and homelessness, acknowledging that future development in Nome will Community Partnership-Based: As a recognized catalyst for positive change, NCC is a convener and facilitator in building support for the formation of meaningful partnerships with the community, government, nonprofits and tribal entities. Sustainably-Supported: NCC continues to thrive, working to enhance its governance foundation, strengthen new executive leadership, and build a solid financial foundation for the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

NEST began in response to several freezing deaths on the streets of Nome. Creating a shelter was a community grassroots effort to prevent exposure related death by providing a warm, safe place to sleep for anyone in need. With no operating funds and donated space in a local church; an entirely volunteer staff, NEST opened its doors on nights when the weather was predicted to reach -10 F, or -20 F wind-chill, the temperature zone of highest risk of exposure-related death. Funded through State and federal grants, local donations and support from the City of Nome, the shelter located at the Karmun Center of Nazarene Church now operates for six of the coldest months of the year. Local churches provide delicious soups each night to provide a warm meal to our shelter guests.
This homeless program is a “wet shelter” or full tolerance policy for hopeless chronically dependent alcoholics or individuals with drug induced altered consciousness.

Population(s) Served
Alaskan Natives
American Indians
Multiracial people
Widows and widowers
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United Women in Faith 1970

Citygate Network 2022

The Foraker Group 2020

GuideStar 2020

Givebutter 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have the skills necessary to maintain personal health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of children registered in Boys and Girls Club program who were able to show how to put into action a series of basic hygiene procedures like, washing of hands and feet and brushing teeth

Number of children who have the ability to use eye-hand coordination, strength, and motor control to use age-appropriate tools and utensils effectively

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Non-adult children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children who have the ability to understand and comprehend communication

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of children who have an innate motivation to master and control their environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of students who demonstrate writing ability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homebuyers/tenants with low incomes receiving housing subsidies as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of community residents in the area reporting a positive image toward the housing complex

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Average age of first-time, full-time, first-year registrants in direct entry programs continuing to the following year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of administrators and staff who plan and experience professional development activities together

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth service participants who have involvement in juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have the ability to use language for expression and to communicate with others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Non-adult children, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of students per classroom during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of applications for housing received from targeted population

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students enrolled in service-learning courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of homeowners/tenants rating their feeling of safety in and around their homes as satisfactory

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

STRONG GOVERNANCE
9. Review Bylaws and consider revisions to include consideration of a smaller board size
10. Schedule annual board training sessions/retreat depending on the board’s training needs at the time – board roles and responsibilities, financial literacy, effective meetings, etc.
11. Board to review and discuss annual findings from the Board Self-Assessment
12. Board to establish an annual E.D. Evaluation process:
• Identifying performance objectives in line with the strategic plan
• Develop a Performance Contract
13. Incorporate a formal practice of completing Compensation Review every three years for all staff positions (Executive Director or Business Manager)

ENGAGED EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP
14. Complete Executive Leadership Succession
• Form Ad-Hoc Committee to oversee ED Search
• Create/post advertisements locally and within the state for six weeks
o If necessary, expand search nationally
• Review applicants, make recommendations for interviews
• Create timeline and operational plan with and without successor ED

SOLID FINANCIAL FOUNDATION
15. Maintain monthly program report format as part of sharing financial statements (Executive Director, Accountant, Treasurer)
16. Focus on attracting significant, unrestricted, non-state income sources to grow NCC’s revenue diversity
17. Create a Business Plan to prepare NCC for long-term sustainability
18. Establish Operating Reserve Policy covering the accumulation and spending of reserve funds, investment, and long-term savings

STRATEGIC OPERATING PRIORITIES (2022 – 2024)
(with Objectives and Implementations Details)

PRIORITY – Culturally-Connected: NCC is focused on offering programs and services with demonstrated community need, positive impact, and that most importantly align closely with the priorities of united Women in Faith and the legacy of serving elders, families and youth.

1. Explore the possibility of sponsorship or ownership for management of certain programs/services
2. Complete the process of internal program evaluation – determine categories:
• Nurture, expand
• Maintain
• Let go
3. Establish formal criteria for new NCC programming, considering the following
• Does it fit within NCC’s mission?
• Is it a duplication of existing programs/services within an existing agency?
• Likelihood of long-term sustainability

PRIORITY – Mission-Driven: Contributing to Nome’s safety net translates to addressing current community challenges today such as services focused on elders, youth programs, substance misuse, and housing and homelessness, acknowledging that future development in Nome will bring potential safety net challenges.

4. Staff to complete, and board to discuss, a “Cost-Benefit Sustainability Analysis” for each program
5. Explore the potential for a shift from the current residential model for youth, to a group home model
• Investigate funding options for construction of a new building
6. Establish priorities for housing and homeless initiatives
• HomePlate Nome, LLC – complete project and consider having a management company take over
• Evaluate options for new housing programs to support chronic homelessness
• Maintain scattered permanent supportive housing sites

PRIORITY – Community Partnership-Based: As a recognized catalyst for positive change, NCC is a convener and facilitator in building support for the formation of meaningful partnerships with the community, government, nonprofits and tribal entities.

7. Board/staff to assess current NCC partnerships, determining which to grow, stop, renew and/or start
8. Board/staff to work to increase partner engagement by convening and facilitating discussions with tribal organizations, potentially establishing formal MOA-type partnerships

PRIORITY – Sustainably-Supported: NCC continues to thrive, working to enhance its governance foundation, strengthen new executive leadership, and build a solid financial foundation for the future.

Grants Management
Transparent management of the funding resources is a sacred trust, not just for accountability and strengthening partnerships with our donors, but more importantly because of our calling to respond to the needs of community members and to fill service gaps not supplied by other agencies in Nome. One of our top priorities is to be the trusted partner of choice, in the non-profit sector, leveraging our financial resources for positive and lasting impact.
Our partnership with The Foraker Group provides support for financial and internal control following guidelines on grants management and expenditure based on Generally Acceptable Accounting Principles (GAAPs). Combined with our experience in Alaska with government funding, institutional donors and supporting corporate partners, NCC is strategically positioned as an organization with strong financial management, donor compliance, ensuring the highest levels of accountability and risk management.

Partnerships
Nome Community Center supports non-profit coordination networks and civic coalitions in Nome region and Statewide level partnerships and alliances to make its actions more rights based, effective, collaborative, and sustainable. At the community, tribe, City, Borough, Region and State level of action we practice a high commitment to State and donor regulations, coordination mechanisms among community of action groups and coalitions of advocacies allowing us to serve the best interest for all Alaskans. NCC is licensed with the state for the operation of our residential home for children. We are accredited through CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) for quality performance improvement. We are members of the Association of Homes for Children and members of several coalitions in the region.
Nome Community Center has been able to establish and nurture good relationships with key donors to strengthen the grants portfolio. In spite of a difficult funding environment, NCC was able to attract funding of an estimated $13 million, and reaching hundreds of beneficiaries between 2020-2023. Major funders include the following with many additional financial supporters with smaller contributions:
1. State of Alaska
2. USDA- United States Department of Agriculture
3. AHFC- Alaska Housing Finance Corporation
4. City of Nome
5. Food Bank of Alaska
6. US Department of Housing & Urban Development
7. NSHC- Norton Sound Health Corporation
8. NSEDC- Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation
9. BSNC- Bering Straits Native Corporation
10. SNC- Sitnasuak Native Corporation
11. UWF- United Women in Faith
12. Alaska Mental Health Trust
13. Rasmuson Foundation
14. Alaska Department of Transportation
15. RuralCap
16. Alaska Children’s Trust

(NEST) Nome Emergency Shelter Team
NEST began in response to several freezing deaths on the streets of Nome. Creating a shelter was a community grassroots effort to prevent exposure related death by providing a warm, safe place to sleep for anyone in need. With no operating funds and donated space in a local church; an entirely volunteer staff, NEST opened its doors on nights when the weather was predicted to reach -10 F, or wind-chill of -10, the temperature zone of highest risk of exposure-related death. Funded through State and federal grants, local donations and community support, the shelter located at the Karmun Center of Nazarene Church, now operates for six of the coldest months of the year. Local churches provide hot soups each night to provide a warm meal to our shelter guests.
This homeless program is a “wet shelter” for chronically unhoused, many of whom are dependent upon substance use to cope with mental and physical health challenges, repeated trauma and poverty. The shelter serves an average of 40-45 individuals each night with nearly 250 unique individuals among those who use the shelter during the season.
Family Services
Family Services is an agency referral program that assists parents and families. Family Service Coordinators work directly with the Alaska Office of Children’s Services to assist families who are at risk of separation from their children. Parenting support groups are a major focus of our work in identifying what is strong, not wrong. We believe that we all have within us the wisdom and cultural competency to manage even the most difficult challenges that confronts families. With the support and encouragement found in these groups, we can tap into a deep knowledge reservoir to help us discover practical applications to grow and strengthen the most important to us - our families.
Parenting workshops offer practical application to help individual men, women and couples develop skills. These workshops are modular and can be adapted to large groups, small groups and one-on-one. Sessions have been held at the state correctional facility, domestic violence shelter, half-way house and for those in the community who want to strengthen their competence as parents.
The caseload of at-risk families averages 30 each year. In addition, parenting workshops are attended by over 50 parents each year impacting more than 100 children.
(Extra Years of Zest) XYZ Senior Center
The XYZ Senior Center functions to offer much-needed services to our community’s elders. These services include meals, transportation, shower facilities, and laundry facilities. Occasionally, special services such as vaccination clinics and nutrition seminars are also offered. Activities are available during the day, with staff supervision, including falls prevention and strength exercising, outings, cultural activities, nutritional and health monitoring in partnership with Norton Sound Health Corporation, fishing, and berry picking.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Nome Community Center Inc
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.76

Average of 5.15 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.7

Average of 4.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Nome Community Center Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Nome Community Center Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Nome Community Center Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Nome Community Center Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$1,114,624 $73,392 $76,924 $376,490 $219,763
As % of expenses -45.6% 4.6% 4.1% 20.9% 10.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$1,137,396 $44,904 $43,550 $340,567 $161,724
As % of expenses -46.2% 2.7% 2.3% 18.5% 7.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,305,395 $1,847,930 $2,178,221 $2,345,532 $2,575,451
Total revenue, % change over prior year -16.8% 41.6% 17.9% 7.7% 9.8%
Program services revenue 12.7% 11.6% 17.0% 28.7% 25.7%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 68.3% 57.1% 43.6% 51.5% 45.8%
All other grants and contributions 17.6% 29.6% 39.1% 19.0% 28.2%
Other revenue 1.3% 1.6% 0.3% 0.8% 0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,441,736 $1,610,212 $1,874,482 $1,800,941 $2,023,182
Total expenses, % change over prior year 62.8% -34.1% 16.4% -3.9% 12.3%
Personnel 42.7% 68.4% 68.1% 67.1% 66.9%
Professional fees 1.4% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 14.7% 12.7% 12.3% 13.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 55.9% 16.8% 19.2% 20.6% 19.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,464,508 $1,638,700 $1,907,856 $1,836,864 $2,081,221
One month of savings $203,478 $134,184 $156,207 $150,078 $168,599
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $75,775 $82,172 $0 $191,873 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,743,761 $1,855,056 $2,064,063 $2,178,815 $2,249,820

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.1 4.9 5.3 7.4 11.7
Months of cash and investments 3.1 4.9 5.3 7.4 11.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.5 3.7 3.7 4.9 5.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $635,123 $661,655 $832,236 $1,103,616 $1,978,372
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $135,857 $280,433 $441,476 $514,900 $320,594
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $395,512 $477,685 $477,685 $669,558 $674,857
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 69.8% 63.8% 70.8% 55.9% 64.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 9.5% 11.3% 11.2% 8.9% 12.4%
Unrestricted net assets $627,192 $672,096 $715,646 $1,023,469 $1,185,193
Temporarily restricted net assets $185,120 $349,446 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $185,120 $349,446 $576,261 $744,362 $1,076,868
Total net assets $812,312 $1,021,542 $1,291,907 $1,767,831 $2,262,061

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Kimberly Bishop

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Nome Community Center Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Nome Community Center Inc

Board of directors
as of 09/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Margaret Thomas

Bertha Koweluk Vice President

United Methodist Church

Melissa Ford Treasurer

Nome Sweet Homes

Jett Raeshawndra Secretary

Constituency

Garrick Fuller At Large

UMC

Joy Morgan Community Expertise

Private

Bridie Trainor Community Expertise

Kawerak, Inc

Jessica Lemaire Community Expertise

Nome Kennel Club

Veronica Alviso Community Expertise

Bering Sea Vision

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/06/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.