PLATINUM2023

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

aka Assistance League of Phoenix   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  www.alphx.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

EIN: 86-0193883


Mission

Assistance League of Phoenix improves the lives of children through philanthropic programs that fulfill basic needs, foster self-esteem and enhance quality of life.

Ruling year info

1964

CEO

Ms. Aimee Runyon

Main address

9224 N. 5th St

Phoenix, AZ 85020 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0193883

Subject area info

Human services

Thrift shops

Population served info

Children and youth

Infants and toddlers

Economically disadvantaged people

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Thrift Shops (P29)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the Greater Phoenix area, there are over 140,000 children grades K-8, who qualify for the free reduced lunch program. These children attend both uniform and non-uniform schools. Our signature program, Operation School Bell, provides wardrobe packages for children who attend Title I schools that have 75%+ free/reduced lunch recipients. For over 30 years, we have been working to provide clothing/shoes/hygiene items for these youth. In 2013, we found a way to make our mobile, by converting a 40' city bus into a mobile clothing center. Outfitted with racks of clothing, 4 dressing rooms and a shoe fitting area, our Delivering Dreams bus was able to double the number of youth served within 2 years. We currently serve over 8,500 children each year. In 2019, we received grants to purchase (3) new buses. During 2020, we retrofitted the new buses, and by the time school started, we were able to hit the ground running. Our goal is to double the number of children we are serving.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Operation School Bell

Operation School Bell provides new school clothing, shoes, and hygiene kits to children grades K-8 that qualify for the free lunch program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Providing teddy bears to children in crisis through partnerships with first responders.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Providing layettes for babies born into poverty.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Distributing new and gently used books to Title I schools grades K-8 and social service agencies that serve children and families in need.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Operation School Bell

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children that received a wardrobe package of clothing/shoes/hygiene kit.

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Adolescents, Preteens

Related Program

Book Gifts

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children who received books.

Number of hygiene kits distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Adolescents, Preteens

Related Program

Operation School Bell

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Assistance League of Phoenix seeks to improve the lives of children in our community through philanthropic programs that fulfill basic needs, foster self-esteem and enhance quality of life. As highlighted in the Vision 2025 report from The Center for the Future of Arizona, one in five Arizonans lives in poverty, and the current poverty rate among children under 18 in Arizona is at 25.6%, almost 4% higher than the national average. That translates to thousands of children in Phoenix that need our help. We believe that parents should not have to choose between paying for essentials such as rent, milk or gas and purchasing clothing for their children or layettes for newborns. Yet sometimes those choices are very real for parents living at or below the poverty level. Assistance League of Phoenix works to serve our community in need by providing clothing, shoes, books and more to disadvantaged children who need our help.

Our mission statement guides six philanthropic programs which touch the lives of thousands of children each year. Our programs serve low-income and disadvantaged children in need by providing new school uniforms through our signature program Operation School Bell®, symphony field trips, children's books for Title I schools through Operation School Bell, Birthday Book Corner, and the Book Gifts Project, teddy bears for children in crisis through HUGS, and layettes for newborns born into poverty through the Wee Help program.

We are a non-profit, volunteer-driven organization, serving the Greater Phoenix community since 1961. Last year 230 members gave 26,858 volunteer hours, equaling the work of 13 full-time employees. We are pleased to say that 100% of Board Members, Advisory Council Members, employees, and Member Volunteers give financially -- and all do so without any requirements. Assistance League of Phoenix has an exceptional track record for providing services to children in our community that are most in need. With over a 90% return to the community, Assistance League of Phoenix operates efficiently to allow grant dollars to be maximized in our programs. During the 2014-2015 school year, Assistance League of Phoenix volunteers distributed over 57,000 units of service (including uniforms, layettes, books, teddy bears and more) to disadvantaged children in the Greater Phoenix area. Every penny donated is put back into our community to improve the lives of children.

Assistance League of Phoenix has accomplished so much in its first 55 years, growing from a 100% volunteer organization to a fiscally strong and capable non-profit with 4 staff members and a volunteer base of over 200 members. Partnering with local businesses to engage employee volunteers has increased capacity and allowed us to broaden our reach in the community each year, serving more children in need.

In 2013, a retrofitted bus turned into a mobile dressing area allowed us to greatly increase the number of children served through our signature program Operation School Bell and currently 64% of all children served are reached through our Delivering Dreams Bus. We are currently working to make improvements to the bus that will allow us to dress more children at each school visit, increasing the total number of children served by 30% in the next school year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jun 01 - May 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

33.90

Average of 48.91 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15.3

Average of 11.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 11% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jun 01 - May 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jun 01 - May 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jun 01 - May 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $135,880 $669,116 $805,230 $560,324 $123,556
As % of expenses 11.9% 61.4% 72.7% 36.4% 6.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $71,409 $607,089 $730,631 $470,389 $28,332
As % of expenses 5.9% 52.7% 61.8% 28.9% 1.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,284,369 $1,761,137 $1,776,465 $2,361,837 $2,257,918
Total revenue, % change over prior year 21.3% 37.1% 0.9% 33.0% -4.4%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 1.3% 1.0% 0.6% 0.7% 0.7%
Investment income 1.9% 1.6% 0.6% 8.6% 0.3%
Government grants 0.4% 2.2% 8.4% 11.5% 3.5%
All other grants and contributions 94.0% 92.4% 87.8% 77.1% 93.4%
Other revenue 2.4% 2.7% 2.6% 2.1% 2.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,139,136 $1,090,083 $1,108,364 $1,539,987 $1,785,552
Total expenses, % change over prior year -8.3% -4.3% 1.7% 38.9% 15.9%
Personnel 30.8% 36.8% 44.0% 36.9% 37.2%
Professional fees 4.4% 5.2% 4.6% 3.8% 4.2%
Occupancy 7.6% 6.4% 7.0% 5.2% 5.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 57.3% 51.6% 44.4% 54.2% 53.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,203,607 $1,152,110 $1,182,963 $1,629,922 $1,880,776
One month of savings $94,928 $90,840 $92,364 $128,332 $148,796
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $76,505 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $303,280 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,298,535 $1,546,230 $1,275,327 $1,834,759 $2,029,572

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 7.2 10.6 15.7 15.8 15.3
Months of cash and investments 17.4 21.4 27.8 24.1 22.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 20.1 25.0 33.0 27.9 24.6
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $687,541 $963,618 $1,446,146 $2,021,959 $2,282,187
Investments $963,333 $979,920 $1,125,183 $1,066,646 $1,061,282
Receivables $0 $1,000 $2,500 $3,125 $68,722
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,662,973 $2,966,251 $2,989,518 $3,006,914 $3,066,107
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 46.7% 44.0% 46.1% 48.6% 51.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.1% 2.6% 2.4% 1.9% 1.8%
Unrestricted net assets $3,324,494 $3,931,583 $4,662,214 $5,132,603 $5,160,935
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $340,000
Total net assets $3,324,494 $3,931,583 $4,662,214 $5,132,603 $5,500,935

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Ms. Aimee Runyon

Aimee Runyon, a native of Arizona, returned to be the Chief Executive Officer of Assistance League of Phoenix in 2018. Aimee was selected to be the 1st Executive Director for Assistance League of Phoenix as well as the first out of 122 Assistance League chapter’s nationwide back in 2012. In 2015, Aimee was recruited to be the CEO of notMYkid. After 26 years in the nonprofit industry, her return to Assistance League of Phoenix in 2018 came as a result of following her “why” for nonprofit service. Aimee also served as the 1st Executive Director for Matthew’s Crossing Food Bank, located in Chandler, Arizona. Aimee donates her time and resources to several nonprofit organizations in the Valley. Aimee served as Board President of ONE as well as serving as the President of the Chandler Non Profit Coalition. Additionally, she was on the steering committee that started Arizona Gives Day. Aimee was invited to sit on ASU President Crow’s Community Council as well as the first CoBiz C3 group.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Assistance League of Phoenix Arizona, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/22/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Barbara Hood


Board co-chair

Susan Frank

Patsy Nodilo

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Susan Frank

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Susan Thomas

Susan Bolls

Jim Nygren

Fry's Food Stores

Janet Bioletto

Judy Mullin

Teniesa Moline

Sara Fleury

Kitchell

Chris Orkild

BMO Bank

Joanne Winter

Dan Aspery

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/22/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser