GOLD2023

Journeymen Triangle

Mentoring | Adventure | Transformation

GuideStar Charity Check

Journeymen Triangle

EIN: 45-3116233


Mission

We mentor teenage boys on their paths to becoming men of integrity. We do this by supporting self-awareness, community connection, and emotional growth in disconnected 12-19-year-olds through group mentoring, leadership development, and opportunities for community service.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Jordan Bowman

Program Director

Jacob Humphrey

Main address

1304 Cane Creek Drive

Garner, NC 27529 USA

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EIN

45-3116233

Subject area info

Leadership development

Youth development

Youth mentoring

Community service for youth

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Young adults

Single parents

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rites of Passage Adventure Weekend

Our signature initiatory experience—called the Rites Of Passage Adventure Weekend (ROPAW)—provides a ritualized opportunity for boys to acknowledge and honor who they are, to declare what kind of men they want to be and to offer a distinct threshold into manhood through which they can step with full awareness and integrity.

ROPAW is part of a greater worldwide movement that seeks to reintegrate rites of passage into our culture as a vital element in fostering sustainable communities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Community mentor groups or “J-Groups” are held twice each month for two hours with mentors and Journeymen, who we call “J-Men.” J-Group meetings are structured opportunities to explore aspects of healthy masculinity. Participants learn about accountability, integrity, personal responsibility, honest communication, emotional literacy, and the importance of discovering and articulating a sense of personal mission in the world.

These are safe and brave spaces in which J-Men are encouraged to talk about the events, emotions, and experiences of their lives. It is where they get to practice being fully alive and communicative among men and peers, and where mentors are challenged to model authenticity, vulnerability and other aspects of healthy masculinity.

For many of the boys, our meetings can be the first time they witness men being open, honest, and non-judgmental. This experience enables boys to develop positive decision-making skills, by learning how to analyze their choices and assess the consequences of their actions. We provide a place of belonging, an opportunity to be authentic, a way to interact with other boys and men emotionally. Our groups give boys a sense that community will always be there for them and that they can be in charge of their own life in powerful and generative ways.

Each community J-group group consists of 5-10 teenage boys, 1-2 trained facilitator(s), and 2-5 volunteer male mentors. We specifically work with 13-19-year-old teenage boys. Many of the boys in our program are considered, “at-risk” or otherwise disconnected, displaced, and/or without a supportive community. Many of the boys would not fall into this "at-risk" category but still benefit from this supportive community of men and boys.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Adolescent boys
At-risk youth
Young men

Virtual Journeymen Mentoring Groups or "J-groups" are a safe and brave space in which young men are encouraged to talk about the events, emotions, and experiences of their lives. It is where they get to practice being fully alive and communicative among men and peers, and where mentors model authenticity, vulnerability, and other aspects of healthy masculinity.

These mentoring circles have been happening weekly for the past 10 years in Raleigh and Asheville, NC. Due to the pandemics in 2020, we moved created virtual groups and have opened our programs up to young men across the state of North Carolina and across the country. Groups consist of 1-2 staff facilitator(s), 2-5 volunteer male mentors, and 5-15 teenage boys who are referred to Journeymen by teachers, parents, and out-patient therapy groups.

For many of the boys, our meetings can be the first time they witness men being open, honest, and non-judgmental. This experience enables boys to develop positive decision-making skills, by learning how to analyze their choices and assess the consequences of their actions. We provide a place of belonging, an opportunity to be authentic, a way to interact with other boys and men emotionally. Our groups give boys a sense that community will always be there for them and that they can be in charge of their own life in powerful and generative ways.

Population(s) Served
Adolescent boys
At-risk youth
Young men
Young adults

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Journeymen Triangle
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Journeymen Triangle

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Journeymen Triangle

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Jordan Bowman

Jordan cares deeply about creating a future that is rich in connection and compassion. He believes in leading from the heart and using business as a force for good. As a mentor, facilitator, and leader, he helps connect people more deeply to themselves, each other, and to the Earth. He is the Executive Director of a community organization called Journeymen, which mentors teenage boys on their journey to becoming men of integrity, developing tools of self-awareness and emotional intelligence along the way. As an Associate for the Business Sustainability Collaborative, Jordan works to make sure that social entrepreneurship is engrained at all levels of the business school and NC State University.

Program Director

Jacob Humphrey

Jake Humphrey, from Cary, North Carolina, has been involved with Journeymen Triangle for 10+ years. He participated in the Rites of Passage Adventure Weekend in 2010 and he has stayed involved with the community ever since. As a result of mentorship and leadership development from Journeymen, Jake has been able to step into a leadership role in many areas of his life. He has been a manager at Chick-fil-A as well as a foreman at Raleigh Reclaimed, a custom woodworking business in Raleigh, NC. He loves the work he does with Journeymen and is committed to serving the boys of today and tomorrow.

Journeymen Triangle

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Journeymen Triangle

Board of directors
as of 02/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

John Craichy

LCSW

Term: 2021 - 2023

Michael Citrini

WCPSS

Cheryl Humphrey

CPA

Liz Christman

LexisNexis

Miles Wobbleton

Smith Anderson

David Lancaster

Lowes

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/5/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data