SILVER2023

The Arc of the South Shore

Hingham, MA   |  https://arcsouthshore.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

The Arc of the South Shore

EIN: 04-2302069


Mission

Since 1951, The Arc of the South Shore has helped nearly 100,000 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including Autism, live their best lives and achieve high-quality outcomes. We are a family oriented, community-based non-profit based in Hingham, MA and offer information, referrals, and a range of community programs. Our mission is to empower families and individuals of all ages with disabilities to reach their fullest potential. We achieve this by providing high-quality individualized services and opportunities that foster independence, community inclusion, and advocacy. The Arc’s primary service area includes the cities and towns of Braintree, Cohasset, Hingham, Hull, Milton, Norwell, Quincy, Randolph, Scituate, and Weymouth.

Ruling year info

1954

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Abigail Parrilla

Main address

20 Pond Park Road Unit 113

Hingham, MA 02043 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2302069

Subject area info

Developmental disability services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Non-adult children

Caregivers

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Affiliations

See related organizations info

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One in five people in the US (approximately 57 million individuals) lives with a disability. With limitations in mobility, hearing, vision, cognition, and/or emotional or behavioral disorders, individuals with disabilities often experience challenges with major life activities, including communication, learning, self-help, and/or independent living. In response, The Arc of the South Shore serves nearly 4,000 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Autism Spectrum Disorder, each year from communities throughout the South Shore and beyond. We work to support and empower individuals throughout their lifespan, from our Autism Resource Center to early intervention for children and our day supports, employment services, and residential homes for adults. In addition to offering direct care, we also offer vital outreach, education, and advocacy services to ensure the full participation, visibility, and recognition of individuals with I/DD.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

First Early Intervention

First Early Intervention provides evaluation, education, referrals, supports, and therapeutic services including physical, occupational, speech, and language for children ages 0-3 who have developmental concerns due to biological, medical, or environmental factors. This program is often a child’s entry point to our services, and- if timed correctly- it can represent an exit from a lifetime of special needs services.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Infants and toddlers

The Day Habilitation program is a therapeutic, community-based program for adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities. We offer an array of clinical services, nursing support, and developmental skills training with the goal of keeping participants out of hospitals, long-term care facilities, and nursing homes. All participants engage in interactive learning experiences including speech therapy, occupational therapy, medical oversight, positive behavioral supports, and life skills/self-care. These services improve individuals’ level of independence, functional abilities, communication and relationships, behavioral skills, and community integration.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Pathways to Possibilities is a community-based day program that helps individuals to develop, maintain, and enhance their abilities and confidence in personal, social, and community activities. Individuals participate in skill development activities in the areas of communication, self-care, relationship building, and healthy living. A major focus of the program is community involvement; we support individuals who have employment as a goal but who may need more support and instruction in order to obtain a job. Others volunteer or participate in civic and recreational activities. Additional programming includes fitness and wellness instruction, music and art therapy, computer training, and self-advocacy training and participation.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

The Autism Resource Center provides information, referrals, and inclusive, community-based programming for children and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families in need of services and education. We do this by developing and building upon existing community collaborations, workshops, presentations, support groups, and therapeutic activities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Families

Personal Care Services provides individuals with a permanent or chronic disability to live in their own residence or community with needed support by a Personal Care Attendant (PCA). PCAs support individuals with activities of daily living including bathing, shopping, housekeeping, and meal preparation.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Adult Foster Care is for individuals who cannot safely live alone but who do not need full-time nursing care. Individuals live with their caregiver, who provides meals and snacks, assistance with personal care, medication reminders and assistance, behavior interventions as needed, shopping, laundry, housekeeping, and transportation to medical appointments and social visits.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

The Residential Supports program provides a wide range of housing options including apartments, condos, and single family homes for adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities. We work with each individual and their family to develop Individual and Family Support Plans. In conjunction with input from the individuals themselves, family members, the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services, and The Arc, these plans allow individuals with disabilities to live alone, with a roommate or family, or in one of our residential homes.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

The Employment Services program offers personalized employment services to individuals with developmental disabilities to help them find and maintain community jobs based on their skills, preferences, interests and strengths. We assist individuals to become members of the workforce through a job preparation curriculum, job skill acquisition, job preference/ability evaluation, job recruitment, on-the-job training, transportation and activities of daily living instruction.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to empower families and individuals of all ages with disabilities to reach their fullest potential, and we have six key organizational goals. They are to:

1. Empower people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) by giving them the tools, through education and training, to be as independent as they can be in order to live full, active, and integrated lives as valued and contributing members of their community. We believe that all people with disabilities are entitled to the same respect, dignity, and equality accorded to other members of society, and we work to achieve this goal.

2. Provide the resources and supports that the individuals and families we serve need to make decisions about their own lives and be heard on issues that affect their well-being. We strive to increase access to our programs and develop sustainability plans to ensure their long-term success. We also look to strengthen and expand our services in response to participant needs, allowing us to be the agency of choice for individuals with I/DD.

3. Advocate at the local, state, and federal level for those policies and activities that promote the full participation of those we support in their communities and uphold their civil and human rights. We also encourage and provide opportunities for participants to advocate on their own behalf and for legislative changes and funding that will benefit them. This includes adequate program rates for our government-funded initatives.

4. Collaborate with others to ensure community awareness, education, and partnerships. We believe that the individuals we support have the right to be fully included and actively participate in all aspects of their community. We work collaboratively with other community-based agencies to ensure coordinated care for the individuals we serve and are looking to increase engagement with our current supporters, local businesses, volunteers, and the families we serve.

5. Ensure a well-trained and committed workforce that is invested in our organizational mission, values, and the individuals and families we support. We value our employees and their contributions to the agency and will continue to improve our ability to recruit and retain the highest-quality employees, increase employee satisfaction, reduce turnover, and implement a leadership development and succession program.

6. Encourage and promote the highest ethical standards and hold ourselves accountable to achieve our organizational goals. We provide quality supports that are dynamic, innovative, and based on the changing needs and strengths of those we serve. We strive to continuously evaluate and improve the services we provide, and to this end, we are developing a robust quality assurance system that includes performance measurement metrics and will use this data to inform management decisions. We are also continuing to implement the use of an organization-wide database to ensure comprehensive, coordinated care.

The heart of the South Shore, our programs provide help, hope, and opportunity to individuals with disabilities and their families. They are vital in ensuring that we achieve the goals of our mission. They are:

First Early Intervention: We provide evaluation, education, referrals, supports, and therapeutic services for children who have developmental concerns. This program is often a child’s entry point to our services, and- if timed correctly- it can represent an exit from a lifetime of special needs services.

Day Habilitation and Community Based Day Services: We offer clinical services, nursing support, and developmental skills training for adults with I/DD. Services improve individuals’ level of independence, health, communication, behavioral skills, and community integration. Our programming also includes fitness and wellness instruction, music and art therapy, computer training, and self-advocacy training.

Autism Resource Center: We provide information, referrals, and inclusive, community-based programming for children and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their families. We do this by developing and building upon existing community collaborations and offering workshops, presentations, support groups, and therapeutic activities.

Personal Care Services and Adult Foster Care: Our Personal Care Attendants (PCA) allow individuals with a permanent or chronic disability to live in their own residence or community. PCAs support activities of daily living including bathing, shopping, housekeeping, and meal preparation. For those who need more intensive care, our Adult Foster Care program allows individuals to live 24/7 with a caregiver.

Residential Supports: We offer a wide range of housing options including apartments, condos, and single family homes for adults with I/DD. We work with each individual and their family to develop plans that allow individuals to live alone, with a roommate or family, or in one of our residential homes.

Employment Services: We offer personalized employment services to help individuals find and maintain community jobs based on their skills, interests, and strengths. We offer a job preparation curriculum, job skill acquisition, job preference/ability evaluation, job recruitment, on-the-job training, transportation, and activities of daily living instruction.

In addition to offering direct services, we have taken significant steps to ensure we are an employer of choice and to improve our technology, evaluation matrixes, and community engagement. For instance, we are in the process of increasing our starting wage to ensure a living wage for all employees, are developing and implementing a salary step structure and comprehensive orientation program, and are creating supports for staff to earn needed credentials. We are also implementing quality benchmarks across all of our programs and reviewing our technical needs to ensure we are prepared to address all future needs and meet state mandates.

Founded in 1951 by a group of parents, The Arc’s history is rooted in providing high-quality educational services, skills training, and advocacy for individuals with I/DD and their families. Over the course of our history, we have strategically developed opportunities that foster independence, community inclusion, and advocacy. We have expanded community-based services and championed policy changes that have advanced the rights of individuals with disabilities in education, employment, housing, and healthcare.

Based on our more than six decades of leadership, experience, and advocacy, our Board of Directors, dedicated staff, and volunteers work together to build a brighter future for individuals with disabilities. Our 15 Board members represent a range of organizations, including finance, business, technology, and local government, and many have a personal connection to our mission. The majority of our Board are the parent or relative of an individual with I/DD. For example, the Chair of our Board, Michael Wilcox, is the parent of two young men with Autism Spectrum Disorder, allowing Michael to lead our Board with both experience and gratitude for our programs. In addition, one of our Board members is a self-advocate who lives in one of our residential homes.

In addition to our Board, our employees are our greatest assets—they provide compassionate care and support to help our participants improve their health, safety, and independence. Each of our 225+ employees plays an important role in ensuring the success of the families and individuals we serve. We employ case managers, registered nurses, behavioral health clinicians, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, residential services providers, administrative and support personnel, and others- each of whom is a valued and important member of our team.

They are led by a team of 11 senior staff members. We employ a Chief Operations Officer who oversees our human resources, facilities staff, and Corporate Compliance and Safety Committees, a Director of Finance, and a Chief Development and Marketing Officer. In addition, our six senior level program directors oversee our key programs and initiatives. They are our Director of Day Services, Director of Residential Services, Director of Early Intervention, Director of Personal Care Management, Director of Adult Foster Care, and Director of Autism and Behavioral Supports.

Finally, each year we engage 200+ committed volunteers. They share their time and talents with our participants, offering enrichment programming including art classes, yoga and fitness opportunities, and music programs. We also host community service days with local business that complete projects such as painting our residential homes and improving our landscaping. All Board members, staff, and volunteers share our core values of people first, community, transparency, self-determination, diversity, and respect.

We recently completed a two-year strategic plan that allowed us to build our capacity to recruit and retain high-quality employees, improve our performance measurement, strengthen our programs, and ensure that our IT systems address our agency’s future. We are now engaged in a second stage plan for 2019-2020 that will allow us to expand upon these achievements and continue this growth.

We are also incredibly proud of our new Autism Resource Center, which was launched in the spring of 2016 and allows us to support more 1,600 children and families each year. The closure of a center in Weymouth nearly a decade ago created a gap in services on the South Shore. In response to the dramatic increase in ASD diagnoses (currently at one in 59 children) and this gap in care, we made the strategic decision to develop and launch our center to meet the need for specialized services for families. Today we offer weekend programming, enrichment programs, and parent support groups, and over the coming year, we are looking to add new services, including educational advocacy and a support group for siblings.

In addition to this new initiative, we recently completed an $800,000 capital campaign for our Day Habilitation facility. We made vital structural, mechanical, and safety repairs that have not only increased the safety, quality, and functionality of our facility, but also allow us the space to serve more individuals each year. We updated the heating and electrical infrastructure, replaced deteriorating fixtures, installed a sprinkler system, and widened the hallways. Our new, modern, and multi-purpose space includes a computer lab; sensory room; fitness room; modernized kitchen and lunch rooms; senior room; oversized classrooms for activities of daily living, development skills training, and therapy; and multi-purpose areas that will be used collaborative by all of our constituents.

As part of this renovation, we moved our administrative offices from Weymouth to Hingham into a new, larger space that allows our entire administrative, human resources, and finance team as well as several of our programs, including our Autism Resource Center staff, Personal Care Attendants, Adult Foster Care, Residential Staff, and others to be housed together. This allows for greater cross-team collaboration, allowing us to provide comprehensive, coordinated care to each of the individuals and families we serve.

Over the coming year, we will continue to address the challenges of today while looking boldly to the future. Our team will remain responsive to local needs and support, empower, and advocate for individuals with I/DD throughout their lifespan. We will also remain ahead of the curve, creating innovative opportunities that positively impact the lives of people with disabilities.

Financials

The Arc of the South Shore
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2020 FY20 Audited Financial Statements 2019 FY19 Audited Financial Statements
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.14

Average of 1.25 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.7

Average of 2.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

20%

Average of 22% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

The Arc of the South Shore

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Arc of the South Shore

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Arc of the South Shore

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of The Arc of the South Shore’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $691,342 $578,249 $392,320 $828,266 $29,348
As % of expenses 6.8% 5.1% 3.4% 6.8% 0.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $495,095 $373,891 $175,816 $602,495 -$237,350
As % of expenses 4.8% 3.2% 1.5% 4.9% -1.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $10,881,338 $11,888,511 $12,136,708 $12,367,540 $12,631,513
Total revenue, % change over prior year 4.8% 9.3% 2.1% 1.9% 2.1%
Program services revenue 46.7% 48.7% 46.7% 46.0% 44.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 0.4% 0.3%
Government grants 49.5% 48.7% 50.9% 50.8% 53.2%
All other grants and contributions 3.4% 2.1% 2.1% 2.8% 2.5%
Other revenue 0.3% 0.4% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $10,186,825 $11,328,367 $11,583,179 $12,156,557 $12,746,934
Total expenses, % change over prior year 6.5% 11.2% 2.2% 5.0% 4.9%
Personnel 72.2% 70.1% 70.6% 69.7% 71.0%
Professional fees 16.7% 19.1% 17.6% 16.9% 16.2%
Occupancy 4.0% 3.5% 3.8% 5.2% 4.8%
Interest 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 6.9% 7.2% 7.9% 8.2% 7.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $10,383,072 $11,532,725 $11,799,683 $12,382,328 $13,013,632
One month of savings $848,902 $944,031 $965,265 $1,013,046 $1,062,245
Debt principal payment $0 $162,114 $141,462 $105,301 $0
Fixed asset additions $535,829 $0 $0 $804,921 $1,051,687
Total full costs (estimated) $11,767,803 $12,638,870 $12,906,410 $14,305,596 $15,127,564

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 3.3 2.9 2.6 2.0 2.7
Months of cash and investments 3.5 3.0 3.1 2.7 3.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.8 2.8 2.9 2.6 2.0
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $2,814,668 $2,702,125 $2,556,096 $1,996,870 $2,908,268
Investments $139,877 $163,836 $400,300 $773,808 $830,459
Receivables $1,216,394 $1,294,871 $1,328,104 $1,226,052 $1,052,083
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $6,352,547 $6,498,448 $6,211,909 $7,016,830 $8,075,410
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 40.5% 42.8% 41.1% 39.6% 37.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 36.6% 31.6% 28.5% 26.5% 41.5%
Unrestricted net assets $4,226,819 $4,600,710 $4,776,526 $5,379,021 $5,141,671
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,282,378 $1,307,326 $1,508,869 $990,224 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,282,378 $1,307,326 $1,508,869 $990,224 $774,171
Total net assets $5,509,197 $5,908,036 $6,285,395 $6,369,245 $5,915,842

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Abigail Parrilla

Abby Parrilla has been an executive member of The Arc team since 2017 as chief operations officer, coming to the agency with a strong background that included: in-patient social services at Boston’s Children’s Hospital, business development and management for PepsiCo, as well as executive leadership for the MA Aging Services Access Points and management consulting and operations for Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She is also a trained mediator and has served as a motivational speaker. Abby earned her undergraduate degree in English and has a master’s in both business administration and human resources management. She is bi-lingual and is a proud member of the Leadership South Shore Steering Committee. Abby is honored to represent The Arc in her new capacity as CEO and is committed to elevating the agency’s culture and mission and serving as a vocal advocate for people with disabilities.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The Arc of the South Shore

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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The Arc of the South Shore

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
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The Arc of the South Shore

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert McDonald

RSM US LLP

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.