PLATINUM2023

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada Subordinate

Together we respond to unmet human needs so all can thrive

Reno, NV   |  ccsnn.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

EIN: 88-0339754  Subordinate info


Mission

Catholic Charities is respected for service with compassion and respect for the dignity of others, excellence and efficiency in its operations, and strength in advocacy and leadership in addressing human needs.

Ruling year info

1946

CEO

Mrs. Marie Baxter

Main address

PO Box 5099

Reno, NV 89513 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

88-0339754

Subject area info

Human services

Population served info

Adults

Immigrants and migrants

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As of January 2019, Nevada had an estimated 7,169 experiencing homelessness on any given day, as reported by Continuums of Care to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Of that Total, 183 were family households, 674 were Veterans, 1,285 were unaccompanied young adults (aged 18-24), and 715 were individuals experiencing chronic homelessness. For nearly 80 years, Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada has been providing support to the most vulnerable members of the communities in which we serve. We help individuals and families of all cultures and beliefs rise up out of poverty and overcome the barriers to self-sufficiency. We do this through a broad range of services, including food resources and case management. On average, more than 50,000 individuals receive support from us on a monthly basis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Battle Born Housing Plus

Battle Born Housing Plus is a sober community for low-income men who need wraparound services, including workforce development, to address their needs for both short and long-term stability.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The largest food pantry in the state serving 36,000 people per month. We support 33 other partner pantries all across the state (except Clark County), 4 of which are 'client choice' pantries. We offer non-perishable, canned and packaged food products to individuals and families in need at no cost. Many of these pantry locations also offer human and social services when active.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

The St. Vincent's Dining Room is Reno oldest 'soup kitchen' welcoming all who are hungry in our community. The dining room serves 1,200 hot, free, and nutritious meals each day. We serve more than 398,000 meals a year to the homeless and working poor population, seven days a week.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

If clients have a difficult time getting to us, we take our outreach teams and vans out into the community to connect low income recipients with a range of social services. We bring these services to every county in the state except for Clark County. Each of these services also accompany all of our food distribution and pantries.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Our Immigration Legal Services help clients find and fund a legal pathway to citizenship. We assist people with obtaining legal permanent residency, temporary protective status, employment authorization, U non-immigrant status, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Our St. Vincent's Resource Hub houses our case management services, benefit enrollment services, rental assistance, utility assistance, workplace development and classes, help with ID's/driver's licenses, and our emergency services. All services are provided free of charge.

Our benefit enrollment services help assist low-income Medicare beneficiaries access available benefits.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Services offered through our Thriving Families Support Center focus on mitigating the root causes of poverty, which include a lack of affordable housing, scarcity of food, neighborhood inequalities, unemployment/low wage jobs, and other challenges our clients navigate on a daily basis.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Families

Elevating Families is a new economic mobility mentoring program that is designed to help individuals and families increase their income, set goals, plan financially, and leave the cycle of poverty. Program participants will work with a coach who will help design and implement a self-sufficiency plan that will transform lives and address generational poverty, as well.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

The Wellness Center helps with basic supplies such as hygiene kits, diapers, blankets, coats and jackets, emergency clothing needs, and home starter kits. All offerings are free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

As a result of an annual NCOA (National Council on Aging) Grant, our two nursing teams travel all over the state, in every county but Clark, offering wellness checks and vaccines to seniors and children in need of this service. Our teams consist of two full-time nurses and two full-time nursing assistants. Often our nursing teams accompany our other outreach services extending our wraparound benefits. These women have become trusted allies, especially in the rural communities, often providing some of the only regular care for residents, while working within challenging geographical locations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

St. Vincent's Dining Room

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This represents all volunteer hours donated across our 4th street campus hub, related facilities, as well as mobile pantries and service locations.

Opened two new Neighborhood Centers with Client Choice Pantries in 2022. At least two more Neighborhood Centers with Client Choice pantries in 2023, in Winnemucca and Reno on Moana Lane.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

St. Vincent's Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These pantries allow individuals to 'shop' for preferred foods, in their own neighborhoods, free of charge. Additional human and social services are also provided at these locations and times.

Number of people received immigration service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Immigration Legal Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes consultations and cases

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We help individuals and families of all cultures and beliefs rise up out of poverty and overcome the barriers to self-sufficiency. We do this through a broad range of services, including food resources and case management. On average, more than 50,000 individuals receive support from us on a monthly basis.

• The Resource Hub serves those who wonder how they will be able to meet their most basic needs through homelessness prevention
• The Dining Room is Reno’s oldest “soup kitchen” and strives to ensure that our homeless community is receiving at least one hot meal a day..
• The Food Pantry is the largest food pantry in northern Nevada and our strategy is to reduce food insecurity in our state.
• The Immigration Assistance Program provides high quality, low-cost or pro bono legal immigration services for foreign-born individuals and their families who seek to obtain or extend lawful immigration status or are seeking citizenship in the United States.
• At Crossroads Sober Living, we provide housing and supportive living arrangements for men battling addiction and transitioning out of homelessness, including drug and alcohol counseling.

Through our St. Vincent’s Programs, we are able to provide the following assistance:
• The Resource Hub serves those who wonder how they will be able to meet their most basic needs through homelessness prevention:
– Case Management & Emergency Needs: Our caseworkers strive to understand how to help an individual or family by addressing not only the most basic needs (i.e., food, shelter, hygiene, and clothing) but also homelessness prevention and benefits enrollment. We also help individuals obtain their government IDs, access to transportation through bus vouchers, and assistance with an unexpected co-pay for medical or veterinary needs.
– Rental & Homelessness Prevention: Our rental and utility assistance is designed to prevent homelessness through screening assessments. As with all emergency cases, a designated caseworker assesses an individual or family to understand where they are and help them set goals to reach sustainability.
– Individualized Support to Seniors and Disabled: We home deliver pantry boxes of food, hygiene products, home goods, benefits forms, and other items (games, emergency pickups, etc.) while providing a wellness check. For many of our seniors, isolation is an issue and we are the only personal interaction that they receive.
• The Dining Room is Reno’s oldest “soup kitchen” and welcomes all who are hungry. The dining room serves a free to-go lunch to more than 400 people a day, 7 days a week. Additionally, we deliver to-go meals to three other shelters and an additional 600 people.
• The Food Pantry is the largest food pantry in northern Nevada. We serve 250 families a day, six days a week from our main campus and to more than 20 other food pantries throughout northern Nevada. Each family receives 45- to 65-pounds of fresh and shelf-stable food at no cost.
• The Immigration Assistance Program provides high quality, low-cost or pro bono legal immigration services for foreign-born individuals and their families who seek to obtain or extend lawful immigration status or are seeking citizenship in the United States.
• At Crossroads Sober Living, we provide housing and supportive living arrangements for men battling addiction and transitioning out of homelessness, including drug and alcohol counseling.

We are currently offering 51,566 services a year.
We have expanded our Dining Room service from six days a week to seven. We are now also delivering breakfast, lunch and dinner to the overflow shelter.
Our food pantry provides bountiful food baskets to families. Each basket weighs between 45-65 pounds. We have expanded the number of partner pantries we serve throughout Northern Nevada and have even add home delivery of boxes to seniors.
Our Resource Hub has experienced a year of great demand. We have helped so many people remain housed by helping with food, rental and utility assistance.
The Immigration Assistance Program is successful every time well help a client secure their green card or attain their naturalization.
At Crossroads Sober Living, we see progress in our clients sobriety and ability to restructure their lives to maintain their sobriety and sustainable living. Just in the last week we have had 4 individuals graduate from the program and move into apartments and secure employment all while maintaining their sobriety.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We routinely ask for feedback from those we serve, often at the time of service

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Many struggle with mental health issues. Others we get feedback from.

Financials

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.32

Average of 1.66 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9

Average of 2.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

22%

Average of 22% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $1,373,770 $1,027,072 $178,254 $2,752,343 $2,218,506
As % of expenses 10.6% 7.9% 1.3% 25.3% 20.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $971,835 $633,373 -$197,463 $2,464,936 $1,906,460
As % of expenses 7.3% 4.7% -1.4% 22.1% 17.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $12,273,522 $14,075,374 $13,540,998 $13,706,147 $14,331,947
Total revenue, % change over prior year -36.1% 14.7% -3.8% 1.2% 4.6%
Program services revenue 31.1% 36.1% 28.4% 4.3% 4.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.7% 0.8% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 31.1% 42.5% 38.8% 46.3% 23.5%
All other grants and contributions 36.3% 20.7% 31.2% 40.3% 59.0%
Other revenue 0.7% -0.1% 1.5% 9.0% 13.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $12,979,344 $13,029,188 $13,457,184 $10,859,517 $10,804,167
Total expenses, % change over prior year 1.8% 0.4% 3.3% -19.3% -0.5%
Personnel 50.0% 47.2% 43.3% 34.6% 36.4%
Professional fees 2.7% 3.3% 3.5% 2.2% 1.2%
Occupancy 3.4% 3.7% 4.0% 1.9% 2.1%
Interest 0.7% 0.6% 0.6% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 32.9% 40.0% 43.7% 55.6% 53.3%
All other expenses 10.3% 5.2% 4.9% 5.7% 6.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $13,381,279 $13,422,887 $13,832,901 $11,146,924 $11,116,213
One month of savings $1,081,612 $1,085,766 $1,121,432 $904,960 $900,347
Debt principal payment $36,550 $38,271 $0 $2,828,693 $108,406
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $415,295 $352,353
Total full costs (estimated) $14,499,441 $14,546,924 $14,954,333 $15,295,872 $12,477,319

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.2 1.6 3.3 4.9 9.0
Months of cash and investments 5.5 5.8 7.5 4.9 9.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.5 2.3 3.2 3.5 5.5
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,327,511 $1,712,864 $3,724,904 $4,394,208 $8,108,349
Investments $4,617,967 $4,615,208 $4,677,291 $74,000 $74,000
Receivables $608,155 $916,048 $667,260 $928,976 $316,533
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $12,326,443 $12,377,320 $12,482,796 $12,873,864 $13,247,728
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 35.1% 37.7% 39.8% 40.6% 42.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 25.5% 23.7% 30.3% 18.8% 16.4%
Unrestricted net assets $6,279,716 $6,913,089 $6,715,626 $9,180,562 $11,087,022
Temporarily restricted net assets $4,598,925 $4,723,309 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $4,580 $4,580 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $4,603,505 $4,727,889 $4,874,231 $6,266,942 $6,879,692
Total net assets $10,883,221 $11,640,978 $11,589,857 $15,447,504 $17,966,714

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Mrs. Marie Baxter

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada

Board of directors
as of 09/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Most Reverand Daniel Mueggenborg

Reese Perkins

Johnson Perkins Griffin LLC

Tom Dolan

Dolan Automotive Group

Nick Rossi

ISU-LP

Greg Botto

Sy Johnson

Renown

David Miller

NV Wealth Management

Karen McClenahan

NV Energy

Nick Klaich

DVM (retired)

Kitty Bergin

Jim Cavilia

Rev. Charles Durante

Maureen Klippenstein

Matt Milone

Ed LaRocque

Toyota Retired

Anne Lavoy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/07/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.