PLATINUM2024

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Gathering People for Good

Lubbock, TX   |  www.volunteerlubbock.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

EIN: 75-2325274


Mission

The Volunteer Center of Lubbock connects, empowers and transforms the community through purposeful volunteerism and leadership development. We currently serve Lubbock County and 14 additional surrounding counties.

Ruling year info

1991

Executive Director

Mrs. Sharon Hyde Bass

Main address

1924 Broadway

Lubbock, TX 79401 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-2325274

Subject area info

Voluntarism

Nonprofits

Leadership development

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

NTEE code info

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

Leadership Development (W70)

Nonprofit Management (S50)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Volunteer Center of Lubbock sees a need for engagement and leadership development among community members, as well as support for organizations who want to broaden their capacity and give back to the community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lead

The success of a community will be defined by its next generations. The Volunteer Center believes it is their responsibility to help build a next generation of leaders who are engaged within their community and who know how to use their personal strengths and talents to benefit those around them, in their workplace, in their neighborhood, and every area of their lives. The organization helps individuals and teams find their purpose, enabling them to transform themselves, their community and ultimately the world.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

People are passionate about many things. Those passions often direct individuals towards finding their particular purpose – the place they want to be involved in the community. For the Volunteer Center, service is about more than just volunteering. It’s about discovering personal passion and purpose and then putting that purpose into action. To that end, the center helps individuals, families, groups, businesses and organizations of all kinds find their best volunteer fit, connecting them with the center's 100+ agency partners, facilitating projects for National Days of Service, and presenting opportunities to get involved in a variety of meaningful ways.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

A thriving community is a collaborative one – a community in which everyone is coming together to meet individual and corporate needs. The Volunteer Center exists to be a hub for collaboration between for profits, nonprofits, schools, individuals and organizations of all types.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 1990

Points of Light Foundation 1992

Hands On Network 2007

Board Source 2008

Better Business Bureau 2015

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Lead

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2021, 1,615 adults attended different trainings, workshops, or consultations. 699 youth attended trainings for a total of 2,314 participants.

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Volunteer Center website is the hub of our volunteer collaborations.

Average number of dollars per person served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The Volunteer Center of Lubbock connected more than 61,000 people to opportunities to serve and lead in the community in 2021.

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017, the Volunteer Center had a 63% retention rate.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals who were given a volunteer referral and/or registered on the Volunteer Center's Get Connected website.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2014-2015, the Volunteer Center began a focused effort of increasing the number of individual donors to the organization.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers who served through Volunteer Center programs gave a total of 265,606 hours in 2018.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Collaborate

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

in 2020, the Volunteer Center partnered with 120 nonprofit agencies, 40 secondary schools, and 29 business partners.

Number of briefings or presentations held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

256 presentations, consultations, and training opportunities were given to community entities reaching 16,242 people.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Students

Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Students

Related Program

Serve

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The purpose of the Volunteer Center of Lubbock is to inspire a more engaged community by helping people find their purpose and act on it. Through collaborative partnerships, the center works to develop a culture of service throughout the South Plains and to develop the next generation of leaders.

The Volunteer Center is in the business of community engagement. This means we work with populations and businesses of all types to build a more connected and integrated community. The Volunteer Center engages youth in community service and leadership development through partnerships with 40 area middle and high schools, Youth for Impact program, From the Heart program, and Lubbock HYPE program. Through its leadership programs, the Volunteer Center works to incorporate young adults into board service opportunities and other leadership opportunities throughout the community. Leadership programs also focus on building high performing teams in all sectors. The Volunteer Center partners with 130 nonprofit agencies and a growing number of businesses to broaden the capacity and reach of those partners.

The Volunteer Center primarily facilitates collaboration between individuals, families, groups, and organizations of all types. This may mean connecting volunteers to volunteer opportunities with Volunteer Center agency partners, developing leaders to serve in various ways throughout the community, building the next generation of leaders to value service and giving back, connecting organizations and people with common goals and ideas, or building the capacity of our agency partners.

The Volunteer Center continues to improve upon its programs, consistently looking for innovative ways to inspire community engagement. For instance, in September of 2017, the Volunteer Center hosted the Annual Service and Leadership Symposium - an event designed to bring over 600 students, business people, nonprofits and other community members together in order to inspire and develop the community to be more collaborative and more engaged.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

27.54

Average of 44.38 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14

Average of 15.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13%

Average of 13% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $42,102 $27,111 $4,281 $42,775 $15,833
As % of expenses 6.6% 4.4% 0.7% 6.7% 2.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $33,725 $18,012 -$3,541 $38,962 $12,310
As % of expenses 5.2% 2.9% -0.5% 6.0% 1.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $637,419 $697,642 $565,464 $667,177 $655,495
Total revenue, % change over prior year -32.8% 9.4% -18.9% 18.0% -1.8%
Program services revenue 17.1% 15.5% 4.8% 8.7% 11.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 5.4% 5.1% 6.3% 4.7% 4.9%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 11.8% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 76.2% 79.2% 73.1% 80.5% 78.7%
Other revenue 1.3% 0.2% 3.9% 6.0% 5.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $642,620 $618,647 $646,446 $642,072 $645,717
Total expenses, % change over prior year 5.0% -3.7% 4.5% -0.7% 0.6%
Personnel 61.6% 57.5% 59.7% 59.0% 56.9%
Professional fees 2.6% 2.8% 2.7% 3.2% 3.0%
Occupancy 1.8% 1.8% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 6.3% 6.9% 5.6% 5.6% 5.6%
All other expenses 27.7% 31.0% 30.3% 30.5% 32.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $650,997 $627,746 $654,268 $645,885 $649,240
One month of savings $53,552 $51,554 $53,871 $53,506 $53,810
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $3,974
Total full costs (estimated) $704,549 $679,300 $708,139 $699,391 $707,024

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 10.9 12.8 13.4 13.8 14.0
Months of cash and investments 30.0 36.8 39.0 42.3 36.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.3 9.0 8.7 9.5 9.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $584,661 $661,654 $720,115 $736,775 $751,543
Investments $1,023,837 $1,233,593 $1,381,425 $1,528,261 $1,189,275
Receivables $144,950 $154,594 $60,000 $51,311 $51,000
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $58,752 $61,803 $62,388 $54,847 $35,259
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 68.6% 79.9% 88.6% 88.2% 80.4%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.0% 1.7% 3.2% 2.5% 3.5%
Unrestricted net assets $460,781 $478,793 $475,252 $514,214 $526,524
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $1,279,128 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,279,128 $1,567,824 $1,626,092 $1,750,757 $1,412,038
Total net assets $1,739,909 $2,046,617 $2,101,344 $2,264,971 $1,938,562

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Mrs. Sharon Hyde Bass

Sharon has the joy of overseeing all programs and services of the Volunteer Center's community engagement business. Her delight is in seeing people with a desire to help being connected with opportunities that need what they have to offer. Her personal mission of facilitating, encouraging, and supporting people in maximizing their uniqueness to change the world has been an ideal fit with the Volunteer Center's purpose. Her roles include enterprise strategy and alignment, program and staff development, and relationship building. She also provides training, facilitation, and consultations.\n\nHer volunteer services include the Lubbock Chamber of Commerce Board and advisory boards for the TTU Center for Public Service and Junior League of Lubbock. Awards include: YWCA Woman of Excellence, Association of Fundraising Professionals Outstanding Professional Fundraiser, Women in Communications George Mahon Award, Rita Harmon United Way Award and Girls Scouts Women of Distinction Connect Award.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Volunteer Center of Lubbock, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Cory Powell

Texas Tech University Office of Campus Access & Engagement

Term: 2024 - 2026

Julie Crow

UMC Health System

Matt Rose

Lubbock Power & Light

Brandi Price

Atmos Energy

Jon Mark Bernal

Texas Tech University

Donna Griffis

Retired

Josh Haynes

Madera Residential

Yvonne Limon

US Foods

Mary Moore

Texas Tech University HSC

Neal Spradlin

Lubbock County Criminal District Attorney's Office

Rina Teel

United Supermarkets

Oneal Underwood

Rose Wilson

James Conwright

Vista Bank

Keegan Stewart

Lubbock Christian University

Noah McClure

Student

Rohan Felton

Student

Wyatt Leavell

Victory Bank

Brad Norris

Chick Fil A

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/24/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.