PLATINUM2024

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Feeding the Future

MILWAUKEE, WI   |  https://food4education.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Food for Education Foundation Inc

EIN: 88-0664918


Mission

FOOD FOR EDUCATION WILL FEED 1 MILLION CHILDREN IN 50% OF KENYA'S COUNTIES EVERY DAY BY 2027.

Ruling year info

2022

Principal Officer

Wawira Njiru

Main address

2025 N SUMMIT AVE STE 201

MILWAUKEE, WI 53202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

88-0664918

Subject area info

Food aid

Population served info

Children and youth

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger is one of the biggest—yet most solvable—challenges African children face. 40% of Africa’s population are primary school going children, and 257 million of the continent’s population experience extreme hunger. Despite Africa’s economic growth, 90% of children on the continent do not benefit from a minimum acceptable diet, with lifelong effects on their well-being and development. Kenya, where 43% of the population is of primary school-age, is at risk of leaving its youngest learners behind because of a solvable issue: lack of food. Families consistently struggle to feed their children: over half of the population is food insecure and 1 in every 4 children under 5 is stunted, which hinders children’s ability to learn and their future potential. These issues are magnified in urban and peri-urban areas, where inflation and high living costs make food one of Kenya’s most urgent humanitarian needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food 4 Education

Food for Education has developed the first school feeding program in Africa that delivers quantifiable impact for children sustainably and at scale. We provide affordable, high quality, nutritious meals to urban and semi-urban public primary school children and early childhood development centers with the aim of improving nutrition and education outcomes. We leverage the demonstrated effectiveness of school feeding to eradicate classroom hunger and improve children’s educational outcomes, giving them the opportunity to break out of the poverty cycle.

At Food for Education, we provide the most affordable school meals in Kenya delivered through smart operations, logistics, and technology. We have three models of delivery to reach this goal: centralized hub & spoke, semi-centralized and decentralized.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

United Nations Person of the Year 2021

United Nations

Inaugural Global Citizen Prize 2018

Global Citizen

Affiliations & memberships

World Economic Forum 2022

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Students, People of African descent

Related Program

Food 4 Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children reached with a meal each school day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Related Program

Food 4 Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.


Chronic and acute under-nutrition and micronutrient deficiencies continue to be a persistent critical issue in many regions due to high costs, low food production and broken food systems. Year-on-year food inflation in Kenya has increased to 7.5%, leading to some of the poorest families spending a great deal of their income on food budget and pushing nutritious food out of reach for millions of already-struggling Kenyan families. The Kenya economic report of 2023 reported that 77% of workers earned less than the minimum wage, further impacting the ability to purchase nutritious food.

Hungry children cannot grow or learn. Unfortunately, over 80% of Kenyan primary school students do not receive a daily school meal, and many children go without food at school entirely. Hunger has detrimental effects on their health, school performance and ability to learn, subsequently hindering productivity and potential. Statistics have shown that stunted children grow up to earn 22% less than non-stunted children while non-stunted children have a 33% chance of getting out of poverty compared to children who are stunted.

A 2021 UNICEF study highlighted that school feeding programs are one of the most effective tools to ensure the return of students to the classroom, particularly after the adverse impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the education sector. Further, the inclusion of micronutrient-rich foods supports improved cognition for children. School feeding programs foster understanding of healthy diets and behaviors that can extend throughout life, particularly if programs incorporate nutrition education.

While Kenya has had several large-scale school feeding efforts historically, none have been sustainable due to high costs, low accountability, poor road infrastructure, and reliance on foreign donors. Enabling scalable, locally-owned, and tech-based school feeding in Kenya will both prevent lifelong effects of undernourishment on children and produce direct outcomes for their families, farmers, education, agriculture, and health systems.

Food for Education aims to tackle this issue by developing the first school feeding program in Africa that delivers quantifiable impact for children sustainably and at scale. We provide affordable, high quality, nutritious meals to urban and semi-urban public primary school children and early childhood development centers with the aim of improving nutrition and education outcomes. We leverage the demonstrated effectiveness of school feeding to eradicate classroom hunger and improve children’s educational outcomes, giving them the opportunity to break out of the poverty cycle.

Food for Education has developed the first school feeding program in Africa that delivers quantifiable impact for children sustainably and at scale. We provide affordable, high-quality, nutritious meals to urban and semi-urban public primary school children and early childhood development centers to improve nutrition and education outcomes. We leverage the demonstrated effectiveness of school feeding to eradicate classroom hunger and improve children's educational outcomes, allowing them to break out of the poverty cycle.

At Food for Education, we provide the most affordable school meals in Kenya delivered through smart operations, logistics, and technology. We have three models of delivery to reach this goal: centralized hub & spoke, semi-centralized, and decentralized.

With our hub and spoke model, meals are prepared in central kitchens (hub) and distributed to schools enrolled in our program (spoke). Our central kitchens range in size and can produce 10,000 - 60,000 meals per day. We source our produce from local smallholder farmers and produce high-quality, nutritious, and affordable food in our central kitchens, which are delivered to a network of schools in the region using a fleet of delivery trucks. Our semi-centralized model involves smaller cooking centers (with an average daily meal capacity of 1,000), with one center per ward (the smallest county subdivision), from which food is distributed to neighboring schools. While the decentralized model involves cooking meals within each school, eliminating the need for meal distribution to other schools.

Currently, we have 18 central kitchens and 55 semi-centralized kitchens distributed across 5 counties in Kenya (Nairobi, Mombasa, Muranga, Kiambu and Mombasa).

Through adhering to a homegrown approach to school feeding, we also boost the local economy, thereby lowering poverty levels for the communities we serve. Buying locally grown ingredients from smallholder farmers creates stable markets and boosts local agricultural value chains.

Lastly, we have been capitalizing on government partnerships to push for school feeding to become a public good. We have 2 county governments paying 85-100% of the costs to deliver meals to early learners in their counties. We also recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Nairobi County, detailing our partnership and the county government's plan to build 10 kitchens with a capacity of 10,000 meals per day that contribute to serving 290,000 public primary school children living in Nairobi County. All ten of these centralized kitchens have been launched and are operating seamlessly! We are excited to be contributors to the largest school feeding program in Africa and are elated about the growth potential that this collaboration has brought about.

At Food for Education, we take immense pride in the caliber of our team. Our dedicated staff are the backbone of our organization, and their collective capabilities are a testament to our commitment to match the opportunity to learn with the ability to learn. Notably, what sets our team apart is not only their talents but also our shared vision of ensuring that no child drops out of school because of hunger.

Our team has experienced immense growth in this quarter due to the recent Nairobi expansion set to feed all the 250,000+ ECD and primary school children in the county. Currently, we have over 2, 800 staff, deployed across our 5 counties of operations (Nairobi, Mombasa, Kiambu, Kisumu, and Murang'a). Most of our staff are parents of the children we serve and for many, this is the first formal job with a guaranteed salary they've held.

As our program further expands, our team is expanding too. We recently made the following strategic hires: Communications Manager, and Business Intelligence Analyst. The Communications Manager plays a vital role in collaborating with other departments to ensure that both internal and external messaging and communication align with our program's goals. The Business Intelligence Analyst provides data-driven insights to streamline operations and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our program.

Our capabilities also tie into the number of kitchens we have to cook nutritious meals. Currently, we have 18 central kitchens and 55 semi-centralized kitchens distributed across 5 counties in Kenya (Nairobi, Mombasa, Muranga, Kiambu, and Mombasa).

We recently expanded our operations in Nairobi County and began operating from 11 new kitchens: our giga kitchen and 10 accelerator kitchens built by the Nairobi County Government. This kitchen count has allowed us to feed 290,000 children, daily, all across Kenya!

Food for Education has served over 32 million meals to vulnerable children in Kenya since our inception! Currently, we feed 290,000 children every day!

In Muranga, Mombasa, and Nairobi we established three government partnerships to feed Early Childhood Development (ECD) learners. In Murang'a, we feed fortified porridge to all ~40,000 early learners in the county. Muranga was our first rural county and we implemented a semi-centralized model, which has proven to be a success based on continued daily service delivery and control of cost per cup. We were able to expand our program to feed 21, 0000 students, both primary and ECD, every school day in 14 primary schools and 118 ECD centers across Mombasa County through a partnership with the county's governor. We are excited to continue exploring government funding opportunities to feed ECD learners.

We recently expanded our operations in Nairobi County and began operating from 11 new kitchens: our Giga kitchen and 10 accelerator kitchens built by the Nairobi County Government. We feed over 140 schools with daily hot and nutritious meals in Nairobi County. Giga Kitchen has played a monumental role in the footmark of our organization. It is the largest kitchen on the African continent and alone, will be able to produce 60,000 meals per day at full capacity! This expansion is a significant step forward in our commitment to alleviate hunger and improve the educational prospects of children in Nairobi County.

In the past year, our headcount has increased significantly; we currently have 2,800+ employees in our organization. This has been a massive effort in recruitment, onboarding, and ensuring culture translates across the organization. We are proud that the team has regular touchpoints through Pulse Checks, All Hands meetings, Lunches and Learns, and annual whole-team team building activities!

Additionally, we're excited to share that we will be expanding our program further into Kiambu County in the coming months as part of our mission to reach more communities in Kenya. We've been working closely with the Member of Parliament of Limuru Constituency, located in Kiambu, to build a new accelerator kitchen with funding from the Constituency Development Fund. We're encouraged by the increasing interest from government officials and parents.

We are proud of the remarkable progress that we've made towards our journey to feed 1 million children by 2027.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Food for Education Foundation Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 05 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 0.00 over 1 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1135.1

Average of 1135.1 over 1 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 1 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 05 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 05 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 05 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Food for Education Foundation Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $988,179
As % of expenses 9459.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $988,179
As % of expenses 9459.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $998,626
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0%
Program services revenue 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0%
Investment income 0.0%
Government grants 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $10,447
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0%
Personnel 0.0%
Professional fees 0.0%
Occupancy 0.0%
Interest 0.0%
Pass-through 99.3%
All other expenses 0.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $10,447
One month of savings $871
Debt principal payment $0
Fixed asset additions $0
Total full costs (estimated) $11,318

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2022
Months of cash 1135.1
Months of cash and investments 1135.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1135.1
Balance sheet composition info 2022
Cash $988,179
Investments $0
Receivables $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $0
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A
Total restricted net assets $0
Total net assets $988,179

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2022
Material data errors No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Wawira Njiru

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Food for Education Foundation Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Wawira Njiru

Peter Njonjo

Food for Education Foundation

Christopher Holmes

Food for Education Foundation

Michelle Kagari

Food for Education Foundation

Kristin Richmond

Food for Education Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.