PLATINUM2023

The Center for Empowerment and Education

aka Women's Center   |   Danbury, CT   |  www.thecenterct.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The Center for Empowerment and Education

EIN: 06-0983819


Mission

Our mission is to break the cycle of interpersonal violence through empowerment, education, and support services utilizing inclusive, trauma-informed, and client-centered practices for all individuals in the community.

Ruling year info

1978

President and CEO

Mrs. Ashley Dunn

Main address

2 West Street

Danbury, CT 06810 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Women's Center of Greater Danbury

EIN

06-0983819

Subject area info

Crisis intervention

Abuse prevention

Victim aid

Family counseling

Domestic violence shelters

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Men and boys

Victims of crime and abuse

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

We fulfill our mission through the provision of free and confidential services offered by our Domestic Violence Services, Sexual Assault Services and Resource Services programs, which include: Crisis Intervention- two live 24/7 hotlines and on-site response at area police departments and hospital emergency rooms; Emergency Shelter for victims fleeing from violence in their homes; Individual and Support Group Counseling; Individual and System Advocacy; Primary Prevention, Education and Training Programs; and Information and Referrals.

We strive to achieve our goals and objectives through the following activities:

(1) Crisis intervention services which we define as a one-time contact on the phone or in person. We staff two 24-hour hotlines (TDD/TDY accessible) serving victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and concerned significant others.
(2) Emergency shelter is provided to women, men and children 24 hours per day, 365 days a year. Elizabeth House, our alarmed and monitored 13-bed shelter, provides safe housing for women and children who must flee from violence in their homes.
(3) Counseling services designed to intervene and break the cycle of violence.
(4) Advocacy services are provided on both an individual and system level.
(5) Education and training including:
A. Group educational outreach for targeted audiences: Risk reduction and prevention programs to schools, organizations, civic groups, and underserved populations (developmentally delayed, elderly, LGBT, and minority groups) on domestic violence issues such as dynamics of domestic violence, dating violence, elder abuse, and bullying.
B. Professional outreach (in-house and community): We train community professionals such as mental health, clergy, education, police, and court personnel, as well as corporate professionals.
C. Community at-large outreach: Includes workshops, participation in forums, fairs and rallies, distribution of informational materials, and media activities.
(6) Information and referral services (Helpline) provide clients with a network of available agency and community resources beyond Women’s Center services.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Victims and oppressed people
Sexual identity

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of civil litigation matters handled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of direct care staff who received training in primary prevention strategies and other techniques to avoid the need for restraint and seclusion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Resource Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The overall goal across all three of our major programs is to prevent or lessen the trauma associated with domestic violence, sexual assault and other major life crises or transitions.

We strive to achieve our goals and objectives through the following activities:\n\n(1) Crisis intervention services which we define as a one-time contact on the phone or in person. We staff two 24-hour hotlines (TDD/TDY accessible) serving victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and concerned significant others. \n(2) Emergency shelter is provided to women, men and children 24 hours per day, 365 days a year. Elizabeth House, our alarmed and monitored 13-bed shelter, provides safe housing for women and children who must flee from violence in their homes. \n(3) Counseling services designed to intervene and break the cycle of violence.\n(4) Advocacy services are provided on both an individual and system level. \n(5) Education and training including:\nA. Group educational outreach for targeted audiences: Risk reduction and prevention programs to schools, organizations, civic groups, and underserved populations (developmentally delayed, elderly, LGBT, and minority groups) on domestic violence issues such as dynamics of domestic violence, dating violence, elder abuse, and bullying.\nB. Professional outreach (in-house and community): We train community professionals such as mental health, clergy, education, police, and court personnel, as well as corporate professionals. \nC. Community at-large outreach: Includes workshops, participation in forums, fairs and rallies, distribution of informational materials, and media activities.\n(6) Information and referral services (Helpline) provide clients with a network of available agency and community resources beyond Women’s Center services.

1. Strong, experienced leadership at the board, administrative levels\n2. Stable financials\n3. Experienced staff\n4. 45+ years experience as an organization serving these goals\n5. extensive community relationships\n5. strong regional and state partnerships and memberships

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, Much of the feedback we receive concerns confidential information, which we do not share publicly.

Financials

The Center for Empowerment and Education
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.01

Average of 2.86 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.5

Average of 6.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The Center for Empowerment and Education

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Center for Empowerment and Education

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Center for Empowerment and Education

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of The Center for Empowerment and Education’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $871,530 $586,780 $1,838,862 $489,250 -$93,057
As % of expenses 43.0% 28.9% 84.6% 18.8% -3.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $829,335 $538,845 $1,786,261 $310,640 -$329,039
As % of expenses 40.1% 25.9% 80.2% 11.2% -11.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,896,435 $2,616,381 $4,030,977 $3,126,140 $2,568,358
Total revenue, % change over prior year 6.0% -9.7% 54.1% 0.0% -17.8%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.3% 0.2% 0.3% 0.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.4% 0.7% 0.5% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 37.1% 49.2% 47.9% 44.4% 61.3%
All other grants and contributions 61.7% 49.3% 51.2% 49.1% 39.6%
Other revenue 0.7% 0.5% 0.3% 6.1% -1.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,024,905 $2,029,601 $2,174,115 $2,599,421 $2,727,708
Total expenses, % change over prior year -0.9% 0.2% 7.1% 0.0% 4.9%
Personnel 79.1% 78.0% 77.7% 74.7% 79.3%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.7% 0.7% 0.7% 0.4% 0.4%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 20.2% 21.3% 21.7% 24.8% 20.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,067,100 $2,077,536 $2,226,716 $2,778,031 $2,963,690
One month of savings $168,742 $169,133 $181,176 $216,618 $227,309
Debt principal payment $15,175 $18,037 $0 $336,441 $19,799
Fixed asset additions $0 $193,051 $789,180 $641,809 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,251,017 $2,457,757 $3,197,072 $3,972,899 $3,210,798

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2022 2023
Months of cash 11.7 13.6 20.4 4.6 2.5
Months of cash and investments 12.3 14.3 21.0 5.4 3.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 12.5 14.7 19.2 5.2 4.3
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2022 2023
Cash $1,968,518 $2,302,830 $3,689,409 $996,762 $559,486
Investments $108,832 $113,956 $117,092 $172,727 $187,689
Receivables $117,322 $115,229 $143,523 $114,152 $356,139
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,315,419 $2,518,697 $3,324,513 $7,219,896 $7,292,364
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 53.1% 51.1% 40.8% 17.6% 21.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 14.7% 11.3% 13.0% 5.3% 5.3%
Unrestricted net assets $2,830,380 $3,369,225 $5,116,486 $6,824,703 $6,495,664
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $57,000 $90,215 $38,884
Total net assets $2,830,380 $3,369,225 $5,173,486 $6,914,918 $6,534,548

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and CEO

Mrs. Ashley Dunn

Ashley Dunn joined The Center in January 2022. She holds a Master of Science in Nonprofit Management and Philanthropy from Bay Path University in Massachusetts and a Master of Science in Marital and Family Therapy. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Social Work from Austin Peay State University in Tennessee. Previously Ashley served as the Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director for Almost Home, Inc. a non-profit organization in Brighton, Colorado. Almost Home provides Emergency Assistance programs and services to households at risk of, or experiencing, homelessness. During her tenure at Almost Home, she initiated the first domestic violence programming in the region. She implemented Trauma-Informed Care programs, services, and employment practices to best meet the needs of those experiencing homelessness, including the victims of violence. Before joining Almost Home, Ashley served as Vice President of Housing Stabilization Programs at Way Finders, Inc. in Springfield, Massachusetts. She also worked as a clinician with group addictions and recovery therapy for Rushford Behavioral Health in Middletown, Connecticut. In addition, she managed intensive in-home counseling and crisis intervention services for Youth Villages, Inc. in Massachusetts and Tennessee. While working in these positions, she gained valuable experience addressing and resolving complex problems with limited resources. She has a strong track record of implementing creative and effective programs that meet the needs of a diverse and ever growing client base. Ashley is sensitive to the needs of a diverse clientele from many backgrounds and cultures. While working in the housing and mental health sector, she saw first-hand the relationship between housing instability, domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The Center for Empowerment and Education

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

The Center for Empowerment and Education

Board of directors
as of 04/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr Eric Eggan

Eggan Law

Term: 2018 - 2022

Glori Norwitt

Homemaker/Community Activist

Elaine Cox

Homemaker/Community Activist

Lori Berisford

Evan Hack

Candelwood Valley Pediatrics

Courtney Elliott

Partnerships at Cedar

Vicki Taylor-Bloch

At Home Design, LLC

Kelcey Hoyt

Linde

Amanda Bristol

Reynolds & Rowella

Erin Byrne

Think Sisu

Paul Fiedler

Nuvance Health

Susan Gessner

Community Activist

Greg Pepin

Reynolds & Rowella

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/7/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/18/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.