PLATINUM2024

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

LIVE UNITED

Springfield, IL   |  http://www.uwcil.org
GuideStar Charity Check

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

EIN: 37-0716060


Mission

THE UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS, INC. IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION WITH A MISSION OF IMPROVING LIVES BY UNITING OUR COMMUNITY TO ADDRESS THE BASIC NEEDS, EDUCATION, FINANCIAL STABILITY AND HEALTH OF EVERY PERSON.

Ruling year info

1942

President & Chief Professional Officer

Marne Fauser

Main address

1999 Wabash Ave Ste 107

Springfield, IL 62704 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

37-0716060

Subject area info

Foundations

Nonprofits

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Social and economic status

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

United Way focuses on protecting services vital to the immediate basic needs of the most vulnerable members of our community; while making long term investments in Education, Financial Stability and Health, because these are the building blocks for a good quality of life. United Way provides ongoing assessment of local needs in partnership with local nonprofits, businesses and community leaders. Community-identified priorities are established collaboration with other organizations and community listening sessions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education Impact Fund - Community Fund

United Way’s Community Fund is supported by they United Way Annual Campaign and is the primary way United Way invests in local programs aligned with community priorities and strategies in the issue areas of basic needs, education, financial stability and health.


United Way's Education initiative has a mission of helping children learn, achieve and succeed while engaging families and communities.


Education Priorities


1. Children enter Kindergarten prepared with the skills needed to succeed

2. Children reach academic milestones on time and successfully transition to middle school

3. Children transition to high school and develop the skills needed to graduate on time with a plan for success after high school

Population(s) Served

United Way’s Community Fund is supported by they United Way Annual Campaign and is the primary way United Way invests in local programs aligned with community priorities and strategies in the issue areas of basic needs, education, financial stability and health.

The Health initiative has a mission of activating and inspiring our community to get healthy and stay healthy.

Priorities

1. Individuals are supported, connected, and engaged to lead healthy lives through access to health care services.
2. Individuals will have access to needed mental health services
3. Unfunded Priority: United Way will advocate on behalf of health issues aligned with selected priorities/strategies

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Family relationships
Health
Social and economic status

United Way’s Community Fund is supported by they United Way Annual Campaign and is the primary way United Way invests in local programs aligned with community priorities and strategies in the issue areas of basic needs, education, financial stability and health.

The Financial Stability initiative seeks to provide individuals and families the education, skills and supports needed to lead financially stable lives through stable housing, jobs skills support and financial literacy.

Priorities

1. Adults are equipped to support themselves and/or their families in a financially stable environment
2. Seniors are supported to lead independent lives
3. Unfunded Priority: Children are equipped with the skills needed to make financially smart decisions throughout their life

Population(s) Served
Adults

United Way’s Community Fund is supported by they United Way Annual Campaign and is the primary way United Way invests in local programs aligned with community priorities and strategies in the issue areas of basic needs, education, financial stability and health.

The Basic Needs initiative supports emergency services vital to the basic needs (food, shelter and provisions) of the most vulnerable members of our community. These services, which include services victims of violence and distaster, stabilize families so that they may begin building a good quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

United Way of Central Illinois administers the local Dolly Parton's Imagination Library Program. This early childhood literacy program provides one new book and family engagement activities each month to children under the age of five. There is no charge to families and all children living in Sangamon and Menard County are eligible to be enrolled in the program. The program is designed to promote early reading, improve family and/or caregiver engagement, and foster a love of reading at an early age.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Social and economic status
Children and youth
Families
Social and economic status

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Pounds of food distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Basic Needs Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Emergency food programs funded under the Basic Needs issue area.

Nights sheltered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Basic Needs Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Emergency shelter provided under the basic needs program. Note, this includes only emergency shelter; transitional and permanent housing programs are funded under the Financial Stability issue area.

Number of children served by a summer learning program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Education Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Summer learning programs are programs which contain a structured academic curriculum, with measured outcomes, as part of their service. These programs include both academic and enrichment activities.

Number of seniors served with stable housing programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Financial Stability Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of seniors that demonstrate the skills needed to remain in their home after receiving services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Financial Stability Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of adults that maintained their housing for at least six months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Financial Stability Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Housing programs are funded under the stable housing priority in the financial stability issue area.

Percentage of children achieving growth in reading skills through Summer Learning programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth

Related Program

Education Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percentage of children achieving growth in math skills through summer learning programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth

Related Program

Education Impact Fund - Community Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of volunteers registered with Get Connected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Get Connected is a service that helps volunteers easily find and respond to volunteer opportunities, in-kind needs and events posted by dozens of local nonprofits.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

United Way of central focuses on protecting services vital to the immediate Basic Needs of the most vulnerable members of our community; while making long term investments in Education, Financial Stability and Health, because these are the building blocks for a good quality of life.

In the area of Basic Needs, United Way seeks to assure emergency food and shelter needs are met for our most vulnerable community members. These programs are not necessarily focused on a long term investment, but instead making sure that those in need have a place to stay and food.

The Education issue area is about helping children learn, achieve and succeed while engaging families and communities. Our programs in this area help children stay on track to by looking at kindergarten readiness, on-time achievement, and ensuring that young adults are graduating with a plan. Children are our future, and it's crucial that invest in them to create lasting change.

Financial Stability groups together programs that are providing individuals and families the education, skills and supports need to lead financially stable lives. These programs include services like job or rent assistance and long term housing for mothers in need while they get on their feet. Financial Stability is about helping people achieve their independence and accomplish their financial goals.

Health is focused around activating and inspiring our community to be healthy and stay healthy. The main thrust in the Health programs that we fund is making sure people have access to health care. Sangamon County has a wealth of medical resources, and our funded programs work to make people feel comfortable using them, improving their health literacy, and that they have access to care that they need.

In addition to these external programs, United Way also funds a handful of internal programs that provided needed assistance to the community. Programs like 2-1-1, Get Connected, Familywize and Dolly Parton's Imagination Library all fit within our issue areas listed above, and further help to connect people with agencies that can assist them or the medicine that they need. As both a convener and connector of those individuals, businesses and groups wanting to make a difference, United Way is uniquely positioned to bring the community together. This is a role United Way has played for many years and something that remains at the core of our work.

Our process begins by generating resources to distribute to the community. We work within the community to build resources, building a connection between agencies and the community along the way. We run several workplace campaigns and work with donors directly to ensure that our community has the resources it needs.

From there, we utilize the expertise of special volunteers from various areas of the community to form our board and committees that decide where we ought to focus as an organization. These volunteers bring a wide variety of perspective and ingenuity to the table that helps to keep us moving forward.

Programs wishing to receive funding, do so under one of our four issue areas of Basic Needs, Education, Financial Stability and Health. Each one of these areas has a Vision Council. Vision Councils are staffed by volunteer subject matter experts to help prioritize needs based upon community feedback, evaluate what services would best assist our community based upon, and make decisions based upon measurable outcomes from the programs. These vision councils think long and hard to make sure that the programs that we fund are having a positive impact on the community. And the final decisions on which programs to fund falls on our board, also staffed by volunteers.

The end result of this process is consistency and productivity. When people donate to United Way they can be confident that their gift is going to be used to making a real lasting impact. We help make things happen, and we let community members decide what is best for the community.

Addressing multiple community needs presents a challenge to any organization. United Way's eight member staff includes two positions dedicated to community impact and organizing the dozens of volunteers which assess community needs and make critical funding decisions. The greatest barrier to expanding the work of United Way is limited funding.

In addition to Community Impact volunteers, the organization relies upon more than 200 campaign-focused volunteers to organize fundraising efforts in workplaces and other venues throughout the community.

Each year, United Way of Central Illinois invests millions of dollars in local services working to meet the needs of our community. Our focus is on protecting services vital to the immediate Basic Needs of the most vulnerable members of our community; while making long-term investments in Education, Financial Stability and Health, because these are the building blocks for a good quality of life. For the 2021 funding year, we invested a total of $1,027,500.

Broken down into our first issue area, that is $232,571 for Basic Needs. For the community, that means there were 96,382 meals served, 739 clients that utilized emergency housing, and 31,148 nights sheltered for members of the community that need it most. Our funding of Basic needs equates to more meals delivered to seniors, more emergency housing for children and parents in needs, and more attention for infants in need of care.

Programs falling under the Education issue area received $461,014. That helped our funded agencies' summer programs serve 307 students, 89% of which saw growth in their mathematics skills and 95% saw growth in their reading skills. By funding programs in Education, we see children achieving their goals and being set on the pathway to success for the future.

Financial Stability can be broken down into three main points of focus: stable housing, employment and financial literacy. Programs within these areas received $158,888 last year. That funding allowed local programs for stable housing to serve 743 seniors, 100% of which demonstrated skills needed to remain in their home after receiving service, and of adults receiving services, 92% maintained their housing for at least six months. In terms of employment assistance, 97% of clients served overcame barriers to employment while 98% increased knowledge of workplace skills. And for the final breakdown of Financial Stability, financial literacy, 42% of people increased their savings, 30% opened a checking account, and 98% decreased debt. These programs are crucial to helping those in financial turmoil to gain some solid footing and propel themselves to success.

Health programs focused on two priorities: access to health care and mental health services. Programs providing access to health care are focused on reducing barriers to health care through working with targeted populations. 493 clients were served by community health access programs. There were 4,582 rides provided to medical services as well as 734 hours of mental health counseling provided.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.41

Average of 4.06 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.1

Average of 3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19%

Average of 24% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $581,980 -$743,654 $744,563 $877,134 -$1,305,511
As % of expenses 18.4% -23.1% 27.3% 30.9% -62.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $577,672 -$750,851 $731,866 $874,247 -$1,310,357
As % of expenses 18.3% -23.3% 26.7% 30.8% -62.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,324,988 $2,871,509 $2,527,285 $2,482,824 $2,790,259
Total revenue, % change over prior year 36.3% -13.6% -12.0% -1.8% 0.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 1.0% 2.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 3.7% 4.3% 5.6% 4.9% 5.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.5%
All other grants and contributions 90.1% 90.3% 89.3% 75.4% 65.6%
Other revenue 6.2% 5.4% 4.9% 18.7% 21.6%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,156,543 $3,216,182 $2,723,819 $2,834,120 $2,088,669
Total expenses, % change over prior year 12.7% 1.9% -15.3% 4.0% 0.0%
Personnel 14.0% 14.6% 18.8% 18.9% 26.3%
Professional fees 4.3% 4.6% 3.0% 3.4% 4.0%
Occupancy 2.8% 2.6% 3.0% 3.5% 4.5%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 75.2% 73.2% 68.9% 69.9% 56.9%
All other expenses 3.7% 5.0% 6.2% 4.3% 8.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,160,851 $3,223,379 $2,736,516 $2,837,007 $2,093,515
One month of savings $263,045 $268,015 $226,985 $236,177 $174,056
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $21,987
Total full costs (estimated) $3,423,896 $3,491,394 $2,963,501 $3,073,184 $2,289,558

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Months of cash 3.1 3.2 3.0 2.2 7.1
Months of cash and investments 27.0 23.8 30.9 32.3 40.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 21.5 18.3 24.9 27.7 33.2
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Cash $817,444 $852,943 $675,577 $526,850 $1,237,202
Investments $6,278,883 $5,525,631 $6,334,743 $7,101,402 $5,784,204
Receivables $1,044,361 $927,167 $850,519 $270,502 $679,029
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $236,226 $239,492 $241,310 $241,310 $153,229
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 62.7% 64.8% 69.6% 70.8% 44.7%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 14.1% 15.6% 12.4% 10.8% 11.5%
Unrestricted net assets $5,745,559 $4,994,708 $5,726,574 $6,600,821 $5,862,612
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,351,561 $1,251,483 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $218,172 $190,589 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,569,733 $1,442,072 $1,448,391 $753,901 $1,459,009
Total net assets $7,315,292 $6,436,780 $7,174,965 $7,354,722 $7,321,621

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President & Chief Professional Officer

Marne Fauser

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

UNITED WAY OF CENTRAL ILLINOIS INC

Board of directors
as of 03/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Evan Davis

Memorial Health

Term: 2022 - 2023

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/6/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/06/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.