PLATINUM2023

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Literacy Changes Lives.

aka The Literacy Alliance   |   Fort Wayne, IN   |  www.literacyalliance.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

EIN: 35-1710780


Mission

Literacy changes lives. Our mission is to empower people and strengthen community through education.

Notes from the nonprofit

We primarily serve low income families and adults and do not charge fees for our services. We rely on the generosity of our community for financial support.

Ruling year info

1977

Chief Executive Officer

Melinda Haines

Main address

1005 W Rudisill Blvd Ste 307

Fort Wayne, IN 46807 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Three Rivers Literacy Alliance

EIN

35-1710780

Subject area info

Child educational development

Adult education

Reading promotion

Immigrant services

Population served info

Children

Young adults

Older adults

Ethnic and racial groups

Immigrants and migrants

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project Graduate

Our learning centers provide a structured, yet personal, place for adults who are preparing to take the high school equivalency exam or looking to achieve other educational goals. Adults (age 18 and older) develop individualized study plans after taking an initial assessment. Classes include independent study, small group lessons, and teacher-directed activities for the class. Computers are available in all classrooms. Classes meet in community centers, churches, or other convenient locations for students. All classes are free and offer transportation assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Unemployed people

Adults work with computers and receive individualized attention, using online resources to gain computer skills and improve basic academic skills. Adults who test below the sixth grade level begin with small groups. Some adults then progress into Learning Centers and work toward their high school equivalency diploma. All classes are free and offer transportation assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Unemployed people
Immigrants and migrants
Economically disadvantaged people

The Literacy Alliance matches volunteer tutors with adult students who are struggling with the fundamentals of reading, writing, and speaking English.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Classes for adults that teach English language learning: reading, writing, speaking and listening. All classes are free and offer transportation assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Immigrants and migrants

Pairs adult volunteer tutors with students in grades K-3 who need help reaching grade-level benchmarks. Tutoring occurs weekly throughout the school year.

Population(s) Served
Children
Low-income people
Working poor
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of adults who received literacy services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who demonstrate improved overall literacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Project Graduate

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The outcomes TLA expects to achieve are academic gains. Success targets: 67% will make gains. Results shown in percentages.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Literacy changes lives. Our mission is to empower people and strengthen community through education.

The Literacy Alliance offers free programs in the community:
• Project Build – previously pre-HSE – Adult Basic Literacy Program
• Project Graduate – previously HSE – High School Completion Program
• Project Connect – previously ELL – English Language Learners Program
• Project Aim – Corporate Training Program
• Project Reads – K-3 Reading Program

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Literacy Alliance serves adults who wish to improve their basic academic skills; the vast majority are living in poverty and seek employment or better employment. We also serve adults for whom English is not their native language. We also serve children in grades K-3 who are working toward reading grade-level reading goals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Due to COVID-19 restrictions, we were unable to hold graduation ceremonies with larger groups of people. We learned that the ceremony is meaningful to students, so we stocked each classroom with caps and gowns so that as soon as a student passes the HSE exam, we invite them back to have a simple recognition ceremony with their classmates. We have continued these "pop up" graduations due to their popularity with our students.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for student stories and experiences is a powerful way for them to understand how they have benefitted from TLA's services and also an inspiration to others. It reminds us to always put students first.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.71

Average of 24.61 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.1

Average of 4.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 11% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Sep 01 - Aug 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Sep 01 - Aug 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Sep 01 - Aug 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of The Literacy Alliance Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $36,291 $51,212 $44,567 $65,258 $63,797
As % of expenses 5.8% 8.5% 6.3% 9.8% 10.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $13,650 $25,925 $21,312 $43,060 $43,566
As % of expenses 2.1% 4.1% 2.9% 6.2% 7.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $689,085 $621,613 $722,747 $709,671 $675,777
Total revenue, % change over prior year -1.2% -9.8% 16.3% -1.8% -4.8%
Program services revenue 2.3% 2.1% 1.7% 1.9% 1.6%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income -0.1% 0.4% 0.8% 0.9% 0.8%
Government grants 25.4% 29.3% 27.6% 27.1% 22.3%
All other grants and contributions 72.5% 68.1% 69.9% 70.0% 75.5%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -0.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $625,752 $605,638 $707,837 $669,152 $589,092
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.2% -3.2% 16.9% -5.5% -12.0%
Personnel 68.4% 67.7% 65.5% 66.9% 68.7%
Professional fees 7.0% 10.8% 10.4% 11.8% 10.1%
Occupancy 5.0% 5.3% 6.0% 6.3% 6.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 19.6% 16.1% 18.1% 15.0% 15.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $648,393 $630,925 $731,092 $691,350 $609,323
One month of savings $52,146 $50,470 $58,986 $55,763 $49,091
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $114,561 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $815,100 $681,395 $790,078 $747,113 $658,414

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 5.4 5.1 4.2 4.9 8.1
Months of cash and investments 6.5 6.3 5.4 6.2 9.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.0 3.1 3.4 4.6 6.5
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $279,321 $257,131 $250,453 $274,885 $396,245
Investments $58,461 $63,283 $70,200 $69,130 $73,286
Receivables $30,181 $41,425 $38,500 $42,870 $64,570
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $220,822 $220,822 $220,822 $230,491 $178,315
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 37.1% 48.5% 59.0% 66.2% 68.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 24.5% 20.8% 16.8% 17.0% 24.1%
Unrestricted net assets $242,024 $267,949 $289,261 $332,321 $375,887
Temporarily restricted net assets $147,868 $115,527 $89,635 $61,527 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $147,868 $115,527 $89,635 $61,527 $86,419
Total net assets $389,892 $383,476 $378,896 $393,848 $462,306

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Melinda Haines

With more than 30 years of experience in a variety of education, business and non-profit settings, Haines brings extensive communication, administration and collaboration skills to the CEO position, which oversees the implementation of a comprehensive organizational strategy. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Kenyon College and a Master of Business Administration from Purdue Global.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

The Literacy Alliance Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr Corey Porter

Lincoln National Foundation

Term: 2022 - 2024

Marna Renteria

Raytheon

Tim Van Houten

Fort Wayne Metals

Corey Porter

Lincoln Financial Group

Michaela Baldwin

Blueprint Test Preparation

Ashley Miller

Northeast IN Regional Partnership

Tammy Allen

Northeast IN Innovation Center

Tracy Davis

Ivy Tech Community College

Kara Densmore

Old National Bank

Ron Duchovic

Retired Educator

Melinda Haines

CEO, The Literacy Alliance

Isabel Nunez

Purdue Fort Wayne

Zachary Barron

Barnes & Thornburg

Susan Baier

Allen County Public Library

Erin Nicolette

Lincoln Financial Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.