PLATINUM2023

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Empowering girls for a lifetime of healthy living!

aka GIRLS ON THE RUN ST LOUIS   |   St. Louis, MO   |  www.girlsontherunstlouis.org
GuideStar Charity Check

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

EIN: 26-0059677


Mission

Girls on the Run St. Louis empowers girls for a lifetime of healthy living. We inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum which creatively integrates running.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Courtney Berg

Main address

3155 Sutton Blvd Suite 101

St. Louis, MO 63143 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0059677

Subject area info

Health

Youth development

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

Women and girls

Girls

Young girls

Students

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Health (General and Financing) (E80)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Studies have shown that, by adolescence, girls begin to experience faster rates of decline in physical activity levels, lower levels of confidence and positive perception of their academic abilities, and higher rates of anxiety and depression as compared to their male peers. As early as age nine, girls’ self-confidence begins to decline. By ages 10 to 13, at a time when peer relationships are becoming more central to girls’ lives, 50% of girls are experiencing bullying such as name calling and exclusion. A study conducted by Dr. Maureen Weiss, University of Minnesota, provides strong evidence that Girls on the Run is effective in promoting positive youth development. Furthermore, she found that Girls on the Run makes a stronger impact than organized sports and physical education in teaching life skills, demonstrating that strategies such as those for managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others, and making intentional decisions are optimized when they are explicitly taught.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls on the Run (Grades 3-5) and Heart & Sole (Grades 6-8)

Girls on the Run St. Louis is a physical activity-based, positive youth development (PA-PYD) program that empowers girls of all backgrounds to develop the physical, social and psychological competencies to prevent unhealthy behaviors and to advance positive health outcomes. The evidence-based, ten week curriculum combines training for a 5k event with interactive lessons that include activities and uplifting workouts aimed to develop the whole girl - physically, mentally, emotionally and socially. Girls learn critical life skills and behaviors such as how to manage emotions, help others, make intentional decisions, and resolve conflict that they can use at home, at school, and with friends long after the program’s conclusion. There are two opportunities for girls to participate; the Girls on the Run curriculum for girls in 3rd-5th grades and the Heart & Sole curriculum for girls in 6th-8th grades. Both opportunities serve girls during a critical developmental period.

The program culminates with girls positively impacting their communities through a service project and completing a celebratory, non-competitive 5k event in Downtown St. Louis. The bi-annual 5k event is open to the general public, and is currently the largest timed 5k race in Missouri and the tenth largest in the United States.

Girls on the Run St. Louis serves more than 6,000 girls annually across twenty-three counties in eastern Missouri and western Illinois. The organization has served over 65,000 girls since its founding in 2002. Missouri counties include Montgomery, Lincoln, Warren, St. Charles, St. Louis, St. Louis City, Gasconade, Franklin, Jefferson, Crawford, Washington, St. Francois and Ste. Genevieve. Illinois counties include Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Monroe, St. Clair, Clinton, Marion and Randolph. The Girls on the Run program, the ONLY physical activity-based, positive youth development program in the St. Louis region, is delivered each fall and spring season at over 400 participating school and community sites. Program participants are in third to eighth grade and come from a variety of public, private, parochial, charter and independent schools across the twenty-three county footprint, which includes over 65 unique school districts.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Where we work

Awards

U.S. National Youth Sports Strategy Champion 2020

U.S. Health and Human Services

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Girls on the Run (Grades 3-5) and Heart & Sole (Grades 6-8)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes Girls on the Run coaches who implement the program each fall and spring season as well as 5k volunteers, and individual and corporate volunteers in-office.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Preteens

Related Program

Girls on the Run (Grades 3-5) and Heart & Sole (Grades 6-8)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes the number of program participants in the spring and fall Girls on the Run and Heart & Sole seasons.

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Preteens

Related Program

Girls on the Run (Grades 3-5) and Heart & Sole (Grades 6-8)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes the number of Girls on the Run and Heart & Sole program sites across the eastern Missouri and western Illinois region.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Girls on the Run curriculum, through its content and structure, will have significant positive effects on the following:
1. Physical activity: frequency, intensity, and duration
2. Psychological well-being: body image, self-esteem, and intrinsic motivation
3. Social assets: positive adult and peer relationships, and resistance to peer pressure to engage in risky behaviors
4. Health-promoting behaviors and outcomes

Building off of these goals, Girls on the Run St. Louis has several stated program objectives as well:
1. Two-thirds of participants will improve their attitude toward healthy behaviors, self-awareness, self-confidence, and emotion management.
2. Two-thirds will improve understanding of life skills to include conflict resolution, goal-setting, managing emotions, leadership, cooperation, listening, and managing bullies.
3. Two-thirds will have a measurable improvement in understanding the value of teamwork, respect, and the importance of contributing to the community.

The Girls on the Run program, the ONLY physical activity-based, positive youth development program in the St. Louis region, is delivered each fall (September-November) and spring (February-May) season at over 400 participating school and community sites. Program participants are in third to eighth grade and come from a variety of public, private, parochial, charter and independent schools across the twenty-three county footprint.

At each site, girls and volunteer coaches meet twice weekly, for a minimum of one hour and fifteen minutes per session, over the course of a ten-week season. The fun, evidence-based curriculum focuses on healthy decision-making, conflict resolution, leadership, teamwork and goal-setting, while creatively integrating running and other physical activity. Each lesson is divided into activities with specific functions to enhance the learning process, and is structured as follows:

1) Getting on Board and Warm-Up Activity: This is usually a short game to get the girls' cardio-respiratory systems warmed up and to focus them on the day's topic.
2) Processing and Stretching: Typically a Q&A about the topic to help the girls apply it to their lives.
3) Workout: Utilizes a personal and/or team goal to keep physical activity fun.
4) Processing and Cool-down: Review and discussion of the day's lesson.
5) Wrap-up: Closes with positive words from the coaches about individual and group behaviors.

At the end of the program, the girls participate in a 5k running event in Downtown St. Louis as the culminating achievement of the previous ten weeks. Each girl sets a personal goal regarding the 5k and participates with a running buddy, who may be a coach, community volunteer or an adult family member. The bi-annual 5k event is open to the general public, and is currently the largest timed 5k race in Missouri and the tenth largest in the United States.

Girls on the Run St. Louis recognizes the importance of collaboration among like-minded partners that share our commitment to improving girls' social, emotional, and physical health. We work with various community organizations such as hospitals, recreation centers, public school districts, private schools, YMCAs, YWCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs, health departments, and universities to implement Girls on the Run within the community. The organization partners with over 400 elementary and middle schools, and community sites across the twenty-three county footprint to host the program. We are invited into communities each season and work with district and school leadership to ensure the qualified people and proper resources are in place to have a successful season. Each team also has a dedicated site liaison and at least two volunteer coaches who tend to be teachers, school staff, program parents and/or trained community members.

Girls on the Run continues to seek a balance of contributed income sources through corporate sponsorships, special events, individual and group contributions and foundation and corporate grants. We also currently have Youth Opportunity Program tax credits from the state of Missouri, which incentivizes both individual and corporate giving. In order to serve families throughout the diverse twenty-three county footprint, Girls on the Run St. Louis offers site-based fees on a sliding scale (ranging from $25 to $175) in addition to need-based scholarships and payment plans for families not able to cover the cost of registration. This program model of collecting registration fees from participants that are able to pay for the program in full while balancing financial aid for girls with demonstrated financial need is one that sets our organization up for long-term financial sustainability and has been proven to be successful in doing so nationwide.

Data from 2019 indicates that Girls on the Run St. Louis has continued to meet - and exceed - our stated program objectives, indicating consistency of long-term measurable outcomes:

1. 95% of participants improved their attitude towards healthy behaviors, self-awareness, self-confidence, and emotion self-management.
2. 97% of participants improved their understanding of life skills, including conflict resolution, goal-setting, managing emotions, leadership cooperation, listening, and managing bullies.
3. 97% of participants had a measurable improvement in understanding the value of teamwork, respect, and the importance of contributing to the community at large.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.16

Average of 12.85 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.4

Average of 6.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 14% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $37,975 $82,078 $142,159 $269,022 $154,355
As % of expenses 3.6% 8.9% 20.4% 29.1% 15.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $37,136 $81,321 $142,159 $269,022 $154,355
As % of expenses 3.5% 8.9% 20.4% 29.1% 15.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,207,670 $926,789 $712,608 $1,260,742 $1,170,611
Total revenue, % change over prior year 16.0% -23.3% -23.1% 76.9% -7.1%
Program services revenue 52.7% 62.1% 14.2% 34.5% 41.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.1% 0.9% 1.8% 2.0% 1.6%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 14.6% 21.1% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 45.9% 38.8% 67.8% 41.5% 56.6%
Other revenue 0.3% -1.8% 1.7% 0.9% 0.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,064,443 $917,956 $696,589 $924,189 $1,022,976
Total expenses, % change over prior year 10.8% -13.8% -24.1% 32.7% 10.7%
Personnel 46.9% 58.9% 68.1% 51.7% 49.9%
Professional fees 4.8% 4.5% 5.6% 5.5% 5.6%
Occupancy 7.0% 7.9% 9.6% 7.5% 7.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 41.3% 28.6% 16.7% 35.3% 37.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,065,282 $918,713 $696,589 $924,189 $1,022,976
One month of savings $88,704 $76,496 $58,049 $77,016 $85,248
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $3,266 $100,834 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,153,986 $995,209 $757,904 $1,102,039 $1,108,224

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 5.4 7.2 9.5 9.3 8.4
Months of cash and investments 9.1 12.3 18.1 15.0 16.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 7.7 10.0 15.6 15.3 15.6
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $476,433 $552,879 $550,789 $712,529 $719,552
Investments $333,806 $385,943 $500,526 $443,609 $670,732
Receivables $51,196 $23,794 $38,783 $48,487 $26,260
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $22,198 $22,198 $22,198 $22,198 $22,198
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 96.6% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 4.8% 15.8% 14.4% 5.2% 19.4%
Unrestricted net assets $684,838 $766,159 $908,318 $1,177,340 $1,331,695
Temporarily restricted net assets $154,150 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $154,150 $95,135 $61,083 $49,000 $66,666
Total net assets $838,988 $861,294 $969,401 $1,226,340 $1,398,361

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Courtney Berg

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ST LOUIS

Board of directors
as of 04/10/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Amy Fulton

Maritz

Term: 2022 - 2023

Kimberly Berry

Ferguson Florissant School District

Mondonna Ghasedi

21st Judicial Circuit of St. Louis County

Robert Harrison

The Daniel and Henry Company

Hannah Nelson

BJC HealthCare

Amy Fulton

Cigna

Jill Falk

Schnucks Markets, Inc.

Jennifer Hardester

STL Med Law, LLC

Allison Krepel

Polsinelli, PC

Mike LaMartina

Ballpark Village St. Louis

Calencia Mitchell

BJC HealthCare

Kelly Harris

Washington University School of Medicine

Amy Eyler

Washington University - The Brown School

Jesika Barnes

KPMG

Gabriela Ramirez-Arellano

Cortex Innovation Community

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/7/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/07/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.