PLATINUM2023

Communities In Schools, Inc.

All in for Kids

aka CIS, Inc.   |   Arlington, VA   |  www.communitiesinschools.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Communities In Schools, Inc.

EIN: 58-1289174


Mission

At Communities In Schools® (CIS®), we surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Ruling year info

1977

President and CEO

Mr. Rey Saldaña

Main address

2345 Crystal Drive Suite 700

Arlington, VA 22202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1289174

Subject area info

Elementary and secondary education

Education services

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CIS aims to address inequitable learning conditions and disparities in chronic absenteeism, drop-out rates, and graduation rates. We surround students with a community of support so they stay – and succeed – in school. Our model of integrated student supports ensures all students have access to the community resources and tools they need to unlock their potential and thrive. We put students at the center and surround them with a caring community of support, anchored by our dedicated staff.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CIS Programs

Working directly in 3,270 schools in 25 states and the District of Columbia, Communities In Schools builds relationships that empower students to stay in school and succeed in life.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of states currently operating in

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In addition to the states listed, the District of Columbia is also being served.

Number of students receiving whole-school supports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students receiving case-managed support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of case-managed students who were promoted to the next grade level

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of school and community sites served by CIS

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of 12th-grade case-managed students that graduated or received a GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of case-managed students who met or made progress toward at least one of their career readiness goals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of case-managed students who met or made progress toward at least one of their college readiness goals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of students who met or made progress toward at least one of their academic goals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The United States' education crisis can be summed up in one statistic: Every twenty-six seconds, a child drops out of school and into an uncertain future. Students whose academic, social service and basic life needs are not met often succumb to despair and frustration, even though they may be bright and fully capable of achieving in school.

Communities In Schools' (CIS) mission is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life. CIS works in the most economically challenged communities – 89% of case-managed students are eligible to receive free and reduced priced lunch; 81% of case managed students served are students of color. By turning around schools where dropout rates are high due to poverty, and going to schools with high minority populations, CIS addresses the dropout crisis where it is most acute.

CIS employs a proven model of Integrated Student Services (ISS). Our vision is to expand quality implementation of ISS to every state through a network of providers benefitting from CIS leadership and services and leveraging resources in their own communities.

CIS will embark on a transformative investment to position the organization and ISS model to attract national, state, and local resources; produce an ROI of sustainable, measurable dropout prevention; and change the lives of children, families, and communities nationwide. We will:

(1) Focus on the quality delivery and scope of services within 180+ existing CIS sites and on judicious and strategic expansion to new markets where there is great need and available resources; and where CIS can leverage involvement to engage policy makers and funders.

(2) Maintain the strongest evidence-based services for young people through sustainable, accredited, and effective non-profit affiliates, fielding certified site coordinators at the local level. We will continue to measure results through rigorous data collection and evaluation, and ensure quality through standards-setting, ongoing training, and our accreditation and certification programs.

(3) Create a funding and practice infrastructure to spread effective implementation of ISS to every state by embedding ISS as the preferred model of dropout prevention in Federal/state/local policy and funding, and positioning CIS nationwide as the recognized source of service provider training, information, standards, research, and accreditation.

(4) Increase the visibility of CIS as a solution through a nationwide communications effort to (a) position CIS as effectively addressing a major societal issue and transforming children's lives through ISS; and (b) provide resources and materials to local affiliates to increase the visibility of their work and engage local stakeholders.

CIS works inside school systems with superintendents, principals, educators, and other personnel, and forges community partnerships that bring resources into schools and remove barriers to learning. CIS addresses the total student—because students with unmet physical, psychological, and social needs cannot learn effectively—and the whole school environment. Our research has shown that attention to needs of both the entire school and the individual student is critical to reducing dropout rates and increasing graduation rates. The core of program and service delivery is the school-based coordinator. Site coordinators tailor services to the needs of individual students, encompassing academic help, direct provision of health care, counseling, transportation, donated goods, mentoring, afterschool programs, and more. With leadership from the CIS national office and a network of state offices, CIS affiliates gather resources within their own communities to implement the school-based ISS program.

CIS comes to the dropout crisis with a proven model, a strong national network, committed staff and volunteers, diverse philanthropic support, and a strong management record. According to 2021-2022 school-year data, the CIS network is comprised of 4,780 passionate professionals in 25 states and the District of Columbia, as well as 15,500 community volunteers who serve 1.8 million young people in more than 3,270 schools.

The network is the backbone of CIS success. The successful delivery of the ISS model depends on the skill, initiative, and effectiveness of dedicated staff and volunteer leadership in 114 CIS local affiliates, and on their strong relationships with community and educational leaders.

It also depends on the strong support of the CIS national office staff who aggregate financial resources that are re-granted to affiliates; and provide information, training, network coordination, data collection and analysis, technical assistance, an influential voice in the national discussion of education reform, and state and local advocacy support.

Working in schools and communities impacted by the effects of poverty in the mid- 1970s, Co-Founder Bill Milliken, started CIS with a 100-year vision to transform how schools are built to support the whole child. The idea was to bring a community of support inside our schools to remove barriers that get in the way of student learning. His hope was that one day our work would be strong enough to impact education policy across the country. Today, as we approach 50 years of CIS existence we are continuing to live into that vision.

Our world is grounded in a long-term vision for change. Over the past 50 years we have accomplished much toward realizing our vision and demonstrated the potential of our model to change systems by driving whole-school results.

113 CIS organizations and licensees in the US

2,900 schools served last year

1.61 million students served annually

96% of K-11 students were promoted to the next grade

93% of CIS seniors graduated or received a GED

86% of students made progress towards at least one student developed, CIS-tracked individual goal

Now, is the time for CIS to boldly set the course for the next 50 years to accelerate progress towards this vision

Opportunity exists for CIS to expand our impact by:

Increasing access to Integrated Student Supports

Strengthening fidelity to the model across CIS' network of affiliates and partners

Advocating for policies, practices, and environments that lead to more equitable and just educational systems

Investing in organizational sustainability & continued elevation of site coordinators as professionals, who build critical relationships with CIS students, connect districts, schools and students with tailored community resources, and support long-term success of students

Supporting CIS alumni to thrive post-high school and be leaders within and beyond the CIS network

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Communities In Schools, Inc.
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23.32

Average of 21.67 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16.7

Average of 8.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19%

Average of 20% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Communities In Schools, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,214,717 $1,778,123 $3,194,851 $7,396,446 $14,309,110
As % of expenses 8.2% 5.2% 11.0% 24.8% 53.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $2,084,375 $1,582,131 $2,872,914 $7,158,802 $13,689,976
As % of expenses 7.7% 4.6% 9.7% 23.8% 50.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $65,736,074 $26,912,820 $15,932,429 $25,993,702 $46,241,712
Total revenue, % change over prior year 209.2% -59.1% -40.8% 63.1% 77.9%
Program services revenue 0.2% 1.7% 4.3% 1.4% 0.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 2.1% 6.5% 7.3% 4.4% 3.6%
Government grants 0.6% 3.5% 7.8% 6.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 95.3% 82.2% 78.1% 80.6% 95.7%
Other revenue 1.8% 6.1% 2.5% 7.7% 0.5%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $26,893,663 $34,149,575 $29,163,386 $29,880,891 $26,607,626
Total expenses, % change over prior year 30.1% 27.0% -14.6% 2.5% -11.0%
Personnel 30.3% 26.6% 30.8% 30.5% 33.8%
Professional fees 11.1% 11.9% 15.7% 10.4% 13.7%
Occupancy 2.9% 2.3% 2.8% 2.6% 3.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 7.4% 4.9% 4.6% 3.8% 0.3%
All other expenses 48.3% 54.4% 46.1% 52.6% 49.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $27,024,005 $34,345,567 $29,485,323 $30,118,535 $27,226,760
One month of savings $2,241,139 $2,845,798 $2,430,282 $2,490,074 $2,217,302
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $582,209 $515,058 $589,784 $458,649 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $29,847,353 $37,706,423 $32,505,389 $33,067,258 $29,444,062

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 11.7 11.2 11.4 11.4 16.7
Months of cash and investments 28.3 23.2 26.0 28.0 32.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.6 3.3 4.9 7.6 14.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $26,161,761 $31,963,638 $27,781,304 $28,437,308 $37,046,121
Investments $37,316,340 $33,946,548 $35,450,268 $41,338,101 $33,804,724
Receivables $27,170,965 $15,840,914 $6,651,311 $1,160,753 $9,523,336
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,056,908 $2,556,503 $3,146,287 $3,604,936 $3,735,195
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 61.1% 56.2% 55.9% 55.4% 70.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.6% 3.1% 4.2% 6.2% 3.4%
Unrestricted net assets $8,890,413 $10,472,544 $13,345,458 $20,504,260 $34,194,236
Temporarily restricted net assets $55,817,164 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $25,010,080 $70,504,430 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $80,827,244 $70,504,430 $55,727,860 $48,400,630 $45,465,424
Total net assets $89,717,657 $80,976,974 $69,073,318 $68,904,890 $79,659,660

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and CEO

Mr. Rey Saldaña

Rey Saldaña is the President and CEO of Communities In Schools®, (CIS™) the national organization that ensures all students are empowered to stay in school and on a path to a brighter future. Saldaña is a CIS alumnus, whose journey from former student supported by CIS to national leader of Communities In Schools, sends an inspiring message to young people nationwide about the power they have to write their own success story. Saldaña holds a master’s degree from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education where he studied policy, organization and leadership studies, and two bachelor’s degrees in political science and communication from Stanford.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Communities In Schools, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/09/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Elaine Wynn

Trustee, Elaine P. Wynn Family Foundation

Sherrie R Westin

Sesame Workshop

James C Chambers

Renewable Energy Entrepreneur, Biodynamic Farmer, Filmmaker

William E. Milliken

Founder and Vice-Chairman, Communities in Schools

Jillian Manus

Structure Capital

Elaine Wynn

Philanthropist and Co-Founder, Wynn Resorts

Donna Weiss

No Affiliation

Robert H Baldwin

Heartland Payment Systems (retired)

Christopher F Allwin

Aetos Capital

Daniel Domenech

AASA (retired)

Michael French

Marketing Executive (retired)

Joseph DiDomizio

The Hudson Group

Pascal Fernandez

PaF Strategy + Insights, LLC

Kimberly B Davis

National Hockey League

Jerry Croan

Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc.

Arne Duncan

Emerson Collective

Zac Guevara

Capital International Research Inc. (retired)

Talitha Halley

Beach Bodi Studios

Shaquille O'Neal

Former NBA Basketball Player and Hall of Fame Inductee

Darilyn T Olidge, Esq.

Brightwood Capital Advisors

Carmen Ortiz-McGhee

National Association of Investment Companies

Isaiah Pickens

iOpening Enterprises

Juan Sepúlveda

Trinity University

Lenny Stern

Shepardson Stern Kaminsky

Christopher Womack

External Affairs for Southern Company

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/8/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/08/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser