PLATINUM2024

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Discover the Power of Healthy Aging

aka The Center   |   Charlottesville, VA   |  www.TheCenterCville.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

EIN: 54-0735666


Mission

To positively impact our community by creating opportunities for healthy aging through social engagement, physical well-being, civic involvement, creativity, and lifelong learning.

Ruling year info

1964

Executive Director

Ms. Melanie Benjamin

Main address

540 Belvedere Blvd

Charlottesville, VA 22901 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Senior Center

EIN

54-0735666

Subject area info

Continuing education

Voluntarism

Exercise

Rights of the aged

Self-advocacy

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Older adults

Seniors

Retired people

NTEE code info

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities (N30)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Increasing the number of older adults who live high-quality, productive, and independent lives is a public health priority. The Senior Center (d. b. a. The Center) helps older adults increase the number of years they spend in good health with hundreds of programs that promote physical activity, social ties, lifelong learning, resiliency, and independence. Research proves that people who participate in programs like those at The Center incur lower health care costs, have a more positive outlook on life, and give back to community as volunteers. Ensuring that every older adult in our community is able to pursue healthy aging, free from bias or barrier, is fundamental to The Center’s ability to meet its mission. Our multidimensional, comprehensive approach is the most effective and achievable means for improving health and well-being, not just in later life but at every stage of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Center

The Center creates opportunities for healthy aging that are physically, intellectually, and financially accessible so that older adults can:
- Connect with others for social support, emotional wellness, and fun
- Challenge themselves to improve physically, intellectually, and artistically
- Contribute their many skills and experiences in service to our community.

Opportunities include-
Health and Fitness: encourages whole person wellness through healthy lifestyle choices

Volunteering: benefiting others by sharing skills and wisdom

Lifelong Learning & Travel Programs: stimulates the mind, to learn more about self and others

Arts, Performing Arts & Arts and Crafts: encourage self-expression and creativity

Recreation: fun, social activities that create community

Services: support, for issues such as bereavement, self-care, and legal consultations

Partnerships: offering access to a greater variety of services and programming by partnering with other area nonprofits.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Design for Aging Review Award of Merit 2021

American Institute of Architects

Better Business Champion 2021

Community Climate Collaborative

Excellence in Energy Efficiency 2022

Community Climate Collaborative

Pinnacle Award - one of the top community centers in North America 2022

International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) and NuStep LLC

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 1963

National Council on Aging 1960

National Institute of Senior Centers 1960

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Older adults

Related Program

The Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteerism is an important component of The Center's healthy aging mission. By volunteering, older adults share their skills and wisdom for the betterment of our community.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors

Related Program

The Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year the Center provides healthy aging opportunities to thousands of area older adults. These numbers represent duplicated program registration figures for each year.

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors

Related Program

The Center

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ensuring that every older adult can pursue healthy aging free from barrier or bias is fundamental to The Centers ability to meet its mission. Scholarships are offered on a no-questions-asked basis.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Over the next three years The Center will pursue four outcomes:
*Propelling healthy aging to the forefront of community priorities

*Leveraging our award-winning center to achieve greater health gains through collaboration, exploration, advocacy, access, outreach, and partnerships

*Providing a place for people from all walks of life to age to the best of their potential

*Fortifying the resources need to achieve this vision.

Through its programming, The Center provides healthy aging opportunities that are physically, intellectually, and financially accessible so that seniors can connect with others for social support, emotional wellness, and fun, challenge themselves to improve physically, intellectually, or artistically, and contribute their many skills and experiences in service to our community.

• Health and Fitness programs encourage whole person wellness through healthy lifestyle choices.
• Volunteer Opportunities strengthen the sense of purpose and engagement with the larger community.
• Lifelong Learning & Travel programs stimulate the mind, to seek understanding, and to learn more about self and others.
• Arts, Performing Arts & Arts and Crafts programs offer instruction, collaboration, and performance opportunities that encourage self-expression.
• Recreation programs offer fun activities, organized and are often led by a volunteer Center participant.
• Services provide basics support, for issues such as bereavement, self-care, or financial and legal consultations.
• Partner Programs provide access to a greater variety of services and programming.

The Center uses the following strategies to increase access and participation in its healthy aging programming:

• Programs are tiered to appeal to a variety of levels of skill or ability. For example, in fitness The Center offers selections from walking the local mall to hiking over mountains. In the performing arts such as band and dance there are options for beginners and advanced groups. In recreation, you can learn the basics of Bridge or play competitively.
• Programs run year-round at different times and on different days of the week to make them accessible to more people.
• Each year hundreds of programs and activities are offered that are free and open to the public
• The Mary P. Reese Scholarship Fund offers scholarships to anyone who expresses a financial need. Around 13% of Center members receive assistance from the Scholarship Fund.

Founded in 1960, The Center is the only place in our community where older adults can find wellness programming in all of the dimensions necessary for successful aging: intellectual, physical, emotional, social, spiritual, environmental, and vocational.

The Center is sustained financially through diverse revenue streams from both philanthropy and earned income. We receive no funding from local, state, or federal governments and significantly depend on support from individuals, foundations, corporations, and civic groups to fund our programming. We solicit this support through a variety of fundraising efforts including major giving circles, direct mail campaigns, and special events. Our earned income is derived from newsletter advertisements and facility rental, as well as nominal membership dues and program fees.

By owning our facility, and maintaining prudent cash reserves, we have maximized the impact of our earned income and philanthropic support. We receive unqualified audits annually and meet all the fiscal standards of the National Institute of Senior Centers as well as the Virginia Network of Nonprofit Organizations. These endeavors account for the current and future financial sustainability of all our programs.

The Center is also sustained by its staffing model. With only 13 full-time and 5 part-time positions making up our professional staff, volunteers supply 65% of the labor it takes to run the Center’s healthy aging programs. Our professional program staff works closely with our volunteers to ensure the overall quality and sustainability of our programs.

Established in Charlottesville in 1960, The Center is the longest continually operating senior center in Virginia. The Center was recognized as the first nationally accredited senior center in the state by the National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC) and is one of just seven senior centers in the country to have attained accreditation four consecutive times.

The Center offers programs and resources, available both onsite and online, that help older adults to connect with others for social support and emotional wellness; challenge themselves to improve physically, intellectually, or artistically; and contribute their skills and experiences in service to our community.

Recognizing the building constructed in 1991no longer had the capacity to serve our community. The Center at Belvedere was constructed and opened in 2020. The new Center provides dedicated fitness rooms, a 400-seat performing arts auditorium, a life-long learning wing, an art room, a game room, a volunteer center, library and so much more. Conveniently located just two miles from our former site, the new Center is a welcoming, warm community hub with more than 47,000 square feet inside and generous outdoor space for healthy aging programs and partnerships. In 2021 the American Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded Charlottesville-based Bushman Dreyfus Architects, the prestigious Design for Aging Review Award of Merit for The Center at Belvedere. This award recognizes advanced design concepts, research, and solutions sensitive to the needs of an aging population.

In announcing the award, AIA representatives hailed The Center as a new prototype and model for similar centers. Calling the robust offering of activities and level of layout and detailed design “exceptional,” the jury noted that “Every aspect of the site, program, and building reflects a strong desire to be comfortable, safe, and life-enriching for its users … This is not a classic senior environment and works hard to break stereotypes.”

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.09

Average of 1.97 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.6

Average of 8.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

24%

Average of 22% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of The Center at Belvedere (The Center)’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,768,050 $5,640,645 $1,725,407 $3,242,371 -$622,715
As % of expenses 187.3% 343.0% 98.0% 159.7% -24.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $2,701,926 $5,576,259 $1,274,564 $2,787,997 -$1,115,143
As % of expenses 175.0% 326.3% 57.6% 112.2% -36.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $9,486,980 $2,799,413 $3,435,987 $1,999,742 $2,408,059
Total revenue, % change over prior year 277.3% -70.5% 22.7% -41.8% 20.4%
Program services revenue 1.6% 6.4% 1.2% 5.8% 10.2%
Membership dues 2.1% 8.6% 7.8% 14.7% 19.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.6% 1.1% 2.6% 2.6%
Government grants 11.6% 0.0% 0.0% 25.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 84.0% 73.4% 43.7% 43.8% 64.5%
Other revenue 0.6% 11.0% 46.3% 8.1% 3.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,477,701 $1,644,581 $1,760,820 $2,030,245 $2,580,393
Total expenses, % change over prior year 7.9% 11.3% 7.1% 15.3% 27.1%
Personnel 56.9% 65.3% 60.0% 60.2% 54.6%
Professional fees 4.4% 3.4% 2.8% 4.3% 3.4%
Occupancy 1.9% 1.8% 3.6% 3.0% 2.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 17.1% 12.0% 8.6%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 36.8% 29.5% 16.5% 20.4% 30.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,543,825 $1,708,967 $2,211,663 $2,484,619 $3,072,821
One month of savings $123,142 $137,048 $146,735 $169,187 $215,033
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $1,969,417 $1,440,327 $160,039
Fixed asset additions $0 $18,923,794 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,666,967 $20,769,809 $4,327,815 $4,094,133 $3,447,893

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 23.0 9.9 9.5 3.8 2.6
Months of cash and investments 26.8 13.2 14.2 7.9 5.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 24.6 -8.8 -4.5 7.0 2.0
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $2,830,525 $1,360,476 $1,391,136 $647,400 $549,690
Investments $471,370 $454,907 $691,697 $689,244 $620,001
Receivables $5,089,246 $2,080,235 $1,158,750 $507,497 $325,760
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $5,040,672 $23,964,465 $21,758,886 $21,762,290 $21,771,493
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 32.1% 7.0% 3.3% 5.5% 8.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 5.8% 41.2% 30.5% 27.4% 28.3%
Unrestricted net assets $6,458,089 $12,034,348 $13,308,912 $16,096,909 $14,981,766
Temporarily restricted net assets $8,006,508 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $8,006,508 $3,500,461 $3,640,168 $324,603 $653,558
Total net assets $14,464,597 $15,534,809 $16,949,080 $16,421,512 $15,635,324

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Melanie Benjamin

Melanie works in partnership with the Board of Directors to maintain the integrity of The Center's mission and planning and ensure a sustainable financial base for operations and growth. She also works in the community to build relationships and partnerships in support of healthy aging for all. Melanie shares "I am privileged to lead The Center at Belvedere, a nonprofit with a mission to create healthy aging opportunities for older adults in the Charlottesville area. My professional background includes strategic planning, fundraising, managing teams, and staffing board and volunteer groups. My fundraising experience includes capital campaign planning and execution, gift planning, principal and major gifts solicitations, foundation engagement and grant writing, and annual giving."

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

The Center at Belvedere (The Center)

Board of directors
as of 02/13/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Christine Thalwitz

Marketing Director, Madison House

Term: 2022 - 2024

Sean Greer

Commonwise Home Care, Co-founder

Joyce Turner Lewis

Albemarle County Schools, Guidance Counselor (ret.)

Larry Martin

Hantzmon Wiebel LLP, CPA

Christine Thalwitz

Educator (Spanish), Buford Middle School and PVCC

Patti Cary

KPMG LLP, Partner (ret.)

Dan Brody

Health Data Services, Inc, President

Mark Brown

Whirlpool Corporation, CFO (ret.)

Katie Caverly

IKOR of Charlottesville, Owner

Deidra Massie

The Colonnades, Sales and Marketing Director

Mary Wilson

City of Tucson AZ, District Manager for Child Support (ret.)

Beverly Adams

Associate Professor, Emeritus, Psychology Department, University of Virginia

Julie Christopher

Board Member of Piedmont CASA

Shareef Tahboub

President of Park Street Senior Living, and Development Director of Assisted Living/Memory Care/Independent Living Communities

Peggy Slez

Council President, Attorney (ret.)

Cecil D. Thompson, Jr.

Major, U.S. Army (ret.); Charlottesville City Schools, Coordinator of Support Services (ret.

Gregory Winston

Principal & Founder, Winston & Associates

Jennifer King

CEO and CCO, Chase Investment Counsel Corporation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/13/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser