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Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

JFS Orlando...A Family of Services

aka JFS Orlando   |   Winter Park, FL   |  www.jfsorlando.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

EIN: 59-1873758


Mission

JFS Orlando's mission is to provide vital, high-quality and innovative social services to people in need. Services are provided to the community regardless of religion, race/ethnicity, age, gender or disability.

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Mr. Phillip Flynn III

Director of Development & Marketing

Aaron Bernstein

Main address

2100 Lee Road

Winter Park, FL 32789 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-1873758

Subject area info

Mental health care

Human services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Parents

Ethnic and racial groups

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Family Services (P40)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Services Program

Our Emergency Services Program includes emergency financial assistance for rent, mortgage and/or utilities through a one-time assistance program.

Population(s) Served
Refugees and displaced people
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

The Counseling, Growth, & Development Program provides individual, couple, family and group mental health counseling in a trusting, reassuring and healing atmosphere. Clinical therapists help clients cope with major life problems in a timely and effective manner and guide people through major life transitions.

JFS therapists specialize in many areas such as:

ADHD, Addiction, Academic Concerns, Alcohol & Substance Abuse, Anger Management, Bariatric Mental Health Evaluations, Behavioral Issues, Bipolar Disorder, Borderline Personality, Child or Adolescent, Chronic Illness, Codependency, Coping Skills, DBT Informed, Depression, Divorce, Family Conflict, Grief, Infertility, Infidelity, Life Transitions, LGBTQ/AIAP+, LEO/First Responder Trauma, Maternal Mental Health, Men’s Issues, Relationship Issues, Self Esteem, Sexual, Trauma & PTSD, Women’s Issues.

To ensure accessible counseling services. JFS operates on a sliding fee scale for those who do not have insurance.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Widows and widowers

Through the RIDE (Reliable Independent Drivers for the Elderly) Program, JFS provides round-trip transportation to essential appointments for qualifying, low-income seniors or disabled adults. This in turn increases independence, promotes well-being, and improves access to food, healthcare, legal assistance, and financial services. Program participants are entitled to two free roundtrip rides per month within a ten-mile radius of their residence.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

The Family Stabilization Program (FSP) is a preventative, six-month case management program. The program is designed for families to obtain self-sufficiency by teaching them critical skills and tools to resolve crises and avoid future hardships while achieving long term stability.

The program’s primary objectives are to improve financial management skills, employability, family stability and mental health functioning, as well as maintain or improve housing. This is accomplished by providing clients with a variety of supportive services at no cost to participants.

Workshops are offered throughout the year as part of FSP, including financial literacy workshops facilitated and employability workshops facilitated through our partners.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Unemployed people
Refugees and displaced people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Unemployed people
Refugees and displaced people

JFS Orlando’s Pearlman Food Pantry fights hunger by providing emergency food assistance to individuals and families. Since 2021, JFS has supplied food for close to 500,000 meals to help alleviate hunger in Central Florida.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Families
Adults
Children and youth
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Refugees and displaced people

The Community Rabbi program is a pastoral outreach service that provides end of life services, burial or memorial services, and other visits, such as hospice, hospital or home visits, to the unaffiliated Jewish community.

Population(s) Served

The Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program provides case management and other support services for Holocaust Survivors in the Central Florida community.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people
Interfaith groups
Families
Adults
Children and youth
Jewish people
Interfaith groups
Families
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Neighborhood Builders Award 2010

Bank of America

Affiliations & memberships

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 1995

United Way Member Agency 1979

Rollins College Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership Center 2000

Winter Park Chamber of Commerce 2002

Maitland Chamber of Commerce 2010

Downtown Orlando Partnership 2021

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.87

Average of 9.93 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.8

Average of 5.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 14% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$1,310,286 $162,258 $528,793 $993,457 -$352,561
As % of expenses -95.7% 12.4% 30.1% 46.6% -19.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$1,363,063 $108,121 $472,524 $940,940 -$403,642
As % of expenses -95.9% 7.9% 26.1% 43.1% -21.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,127,548 $1,011,642 $1,838,880 $3,000,707 $1,415,451
Total revenue, % change over prior year -49.4% -10.3% 81.8% 63.2% -52.8%
Program services revenue 13.9% 20.7% 18.4% 11.3% 26.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -13.6%
Government grants 17.2% 13.3% 41.3% 31.4% 12.3%
All other grants and contributions 67.7% 64.3% 38.9% 57.0% 74.4%
Other revenue 1.2% 1.7% 1.4% 0.3% 0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,368,787 $1,312,346 $1,755,686 $2,129,883 $1,849,666
Total expenses, % change over prior year -3.9% -4.1% 33.8% 21.3% -13.2%
Personnel 50.6% 46.6% 38.8% 49.2% 70.5%
Professional fees 14.7% 20.3% 18.4% 7.7% 5.7%
Occupancy 1.6% 3.1% 2.1% 1.8% 2.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.9% 0.8%
Pass-through 8.9% 22.5% 31.6% 32.2% 11.8%
All other expenses 24.2% 7.5% 8.9% 8.1% 8.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,421,564 $1,366,483 $1,811,955 $2,182,400 $1,900,747
One month of savings $114,066 $109,362 $146,307 $177,490 $154,139
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $145,283 $12
Fixed asset additions $87,969 $0 $0 $104,025 $82,144
Total full costs (estimated) $1,623,599 $1,475,845 $1,958,262 $2,609,198 $2,137,042

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.4 2.2 3.4 8.6 6.8
Months of cash and investments 13.3 12.6 11.7 16.0 15.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.4 4.8 7.0 10.8 9.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $504,920 $237,968 $491,240 $1,531,630 $1,053,216
Investments $1,015,450 $1,143,627 $1,219,577 $1,315,556 $1,401,441
Receivables $66,727 $44,429 $495,448 $117,906 $50,080
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,539,318 $1,557,454 $1,588,746 $1,692,771 $1,772,916
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 30.5% 33.6% 36.4% 37.3% 38.4%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.9% 1.6% 21.3% 14.1% 16.4%
Unrestricted net assets $1,456,602 $1,564,723 $2,037,247 $2,978,187 $2,574,545
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,117,190 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $75,686 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,192,876 $879,432 $532,157 $528,305 $446,652
Total net assets $2,649,478 $2,444,155 $2,569,404 $3,506,492 $3,021,197

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Mr. Phillip Flynn III

Philip Flynn III became the new Executive Director of JFS Orlando in July 2019 and has been involved in non-profit organizations for over 35 years. His career has engaged international medical programs, higher education, religious organizations and animal sanctuaries – nonprofits small and large. Phil has presented internationally as a motivational speaker for non-profit professionals, lectured extensively on revenue enhancement program development and is sought after for macro-organizational reviews throughout the United States.

Director of Development & Marketing

Aaron Bernstein

Aaron Bernstein joined our team in April 2021 and brings with him a wide array of experience and knowledge in the nonprofit sector and the business world.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Jewish Family Services of Greater Orlando, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/21/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Martin Sherman

Landry's Restaurants

Term: 2018 - 2024

Stuart Kramer

Self employed

Martin Sherman

Consultant, Hospitality & Restaurant Operations

Phillip Flynn

Executive Director, Jewish Family Services

Richard Appelbaum

Community Volunteer

Lynn Minkow

Community Volunteer

David Zissman

Business Analyst, Florida Blue

Maura Weiner

Community Volunteer

Nancy Hayt

Attorney, Advent Health

Shari Wladis

CEO, EdTech EASE

Lauren Bloom

Certified Financial Planner, Bloom Investments

Michael Feldman

Retired Attorney

Edward Webman

Retired Pharmacist & Entrepreneur

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/27/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.