PLATINUM2023

American Cancer Society, Inc. Parent

Every Cancer. Every Life.

Hagerstown , MD   |  http://www.cancer.org
GuideStar Charity Check

American Cancer Society, Inc.

EIN: 13-1788491


Mission

The American Cancer Society's mission is to improve the lives of people with cancer and their families through advocacy, research, and patient support, to ensure everyone has an opportunity to prevent, detect, treat, and survive cancer

Ruling year info

1942

Chief Executive Officer

Karen Knudsen

Main address

P.O Box 6704

Hagerstown , MD 21741 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-1788491

Subject area info

Health

Community improvement

Human services

Population served info

Adults

Families

Caregivers

Ethnic and racial groups

People with diseases and illnesses

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Cancer (G30)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At the American Cancer Society, we are focused on improving the lives of all people facing cancer and their families, while working to reduce health disparities and increase equitable access to care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research

Research - support provided to academic institutions and scientists to seek new knowledge about the causes, prevention, and cure of cancer, and to conduct epidemiological and behavioral studies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Prevention - programs that provide the public and health professionals with information and education to prevent cancer occurrence or to reduce risk of developing cancer.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Detection/treatment - programs that are directed at finding cancer before it is clinically apparent and that provide information and education about cancer treatments for cure, recurrence, symptom management and pain control.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Patient support - programs to assist cancer patients and their families and ease the burden of cancer for them.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Advocate for public policies that will benefit people with cancer and their loved ones.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Caregivers
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Increase interventions to reduce colorectal cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest colorectal cancer death rates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total % Population Colorectal Cancer Screening Rate

Increase interventions to prevent HPV-related cancers and pre-cancers around the world.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

National General population HPV vaccination rate

Provide multi-channel resource navigation options

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# Constituents Served with Patient Related Information by NCIC

Improve access to care for those most likely to experience inadequate access to cancer treatment & support services by focus on patient navigation solutions and service programs that address barriers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Patient Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# nights provided by Hope Lodge

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The American Cancer Society, Inc. Board of Directors established Outcome Goals for six Mission Priority areas:

Lung Cancer/Tobacco Control
• Increase tobacco excise taxes in all jurisdictions and increase the federal excise tax.
• Increase the percentage of the population covered by comprehensive smoke-free laws,
with the ultimate goal of a comprehensive, non-preemptive federal smoke-free law.
• Achieve Medicare coverage for evidence-based lung cancer screening and serve as the convener of relevant groups to promote adherence to high-quality screening guidelines.

Healthy Eating Active Living Environment
• Promote environmental change that will improve nutrition and physical activity and advocate for related legislative and regulatory policy at all levels of government.

Colorectal Cancer
Increase interventions to reduce colorectal cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest colorectal cancer death rates.

Breast Cancer
• Increase interventions to reduce breast cancer death rates in specific communities that have the highest breast cancer death rates.

Cancer Treatment & Patient Care
• Provide multi-channel resource navigation options.
• Implement interventions aimed at reducing barriers to care for individuals with lower income and lower education levels.

Access to Care
(This outcome cuts across all areas.)
• Implement key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) related to access to preventive services, insurance market reforms, operation of state and federal exchanges including access to viable provider networks and adequate drug
formularies, enhanced transparency, development of an adequate essential benefits package, expansion of Medicaid, and improved Medicare coverage.
• Improve access to care for cancer patients and their families who are most likely to experience inadequate access to high-quality cancer treatment and support services by focusing on patient navigation solutions and service programs that address barriers.

NOTE: the enterprise conducts a significant amount of work in areas other than the priority areas that are not discussed here.

The organization utilizes a variety of strategies to achieve the Outcome Goals including public policy advocacy, systems policy and practice, information and empowerment, research and resource navigation.

The organization has capabilties to achieve the Outcome Goals including our 501c4 sister organization, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network as well as expertise in cancer control, corporate systems, health systems, community engagement. Additionally, we deliver comprehensive patient information and service programs and operate both extramural and intramural research programs.

Although there are many kinds of cancer, they all start with out-of-control replication, cell death, and loss of normal cell function. Cancer tops the list of Americans' health concerns because it is still a prevalent – and too often deadly – disease.

The Society educates the public, the media, and health professionals about the steps people can take to stay
well, programs and resources the Society offers to help people with cancer get well, the progress toward and
action needed to find cancer's causes and cures, and ways everyone can fight back against the disease. The
Society works to maintain its leadership roles in research, education, advocacy, and patient support programs. Since 1946, the Society has invested more than $4.3 billion in cancer research.

Also, because cancer knows no boundaries, our mission includes establishing key focus areas to help reduce the global burden of cancer. These include global grassroots policy and awareness, tobacco control, cancer screening and vaccination for breast and cervical cancers, access to pain relief, and the support of cancer registration in low- and middle-income countries.

Evidence now shows that early detection can halt common cancers such as those of the cervix, breast, and colon, which represented a quarter of new cancer cases in 2014. We now have strategies that can help prevent many cancers from starting at all. The development of treatments such as Gleevec and Herceptin has shown how specific molecules can target and block cancer-causing abnormalities.

Mortality rates have declined for almost all major cancers for both men and women, and in 2014 we marked an overall 22 percent decline in these rates since the early 1990s.

Thanks to these advances, cancer survivorship has now become part of our public discourse. Nearly 14 million Americans who have a personal history of cancer are alive today – twice the number of survivors as 30 years ago. We expect this number to go from 14 million to 18 million by 2022.

Cancer claims the lives of more than 1,600 people every day in the United States, and worldwide is a growing threat that is projected to nearly double by 2030, causing 21.4 million cases and killing 13.2 million people, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Our organizational mission to eliminate cancer as a major health problem is at increasing risk and challenged by these global trends. Achieving our goal and combating this rising worldwide threat will require us to be more effective than ever before – we will need to quantify the lifesaving impact we have on chronic disease and act as a true leader, bringing others together across sectors to collectively turn the tide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

American Cancer Society, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.77

Average of 1.75 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.8

Average of 1.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

20%

Average of 30% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of American Cancer Society, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$3,402,958 -$8,912,684 $19,927,216 $196,974,775 -$45,133,787
As % of expenses -0.5% -1.2% 3.6% 34.9% -6.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$17,408,328 -$23,743,592 $4,833,638 $183,504,524 -$58,636,800
As % of expenses -2.4% -3.2% 0.9% 31.8% -8.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $769,888,861 $720,131,846 $576,295,531 $734,386,259 $674,472,929
Total revenue, % change over prior year -2.4% -6.5% -20.0% 27.4% -8.2%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.9% 0.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 3.2% 3.4% 3.3% 2.6% 4.1%
Government grants 0.7% 0.6% 0.7% 0.6% 0.6%
All other grants and contributions 91.9% 94.3% 91.8% 88.2% 95.7%
Other revenue 4.1% 1.7% 4.1% 7.7% -0.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $726,570,400 $715,855,760 $548,914,325 $564,191,005 $655,700,683
Total expenses, % change over prior year -9.0% -1.5% -23.3% 2.8% 16.2%
Personnel 45.0% 46.1% 52.5% 42.0% 39.3%
Professional fees 7.7% 7.3% 6.6% 5.8% 6.1%
Occupancy 6.3% 6.5% 7.0% 4.7% 4.6%
Interest 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%
Pass-through 23.4% 22.9% 17.5% 27.7% 29.1%
All other expenses 17.5% 17.1% 16.3% 19.6% 20.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $740,575,770 $730,686,668 $564,007,903 $577,661,256 $669,203,696
One month of savings $60,547,533 $59,654,647 $45,742,860 $47,015,917 $54,641,724
Debt principal payment $5,719,589 $1,665,053 $1,665,527 $0 $2,726,311
Fixed asset additions $22,097,027 $36,921,256 $16,303,561 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $828,939,919 $828,927,624 $627,719,851 $624,677,173 $726,571,731

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.0 1.5 1.0 0.9 0.8
Months of cash and investments 14.6 14.9 20.0 22.0 17.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.4 3.7 4.9 8.9 6.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $63,089,707 $88,291,803 $44,516,886 $42,464,913 $41,852,584
Investments $818,113,845 $798,450,960 $871,586,542 $990,916,360 $910,903,648
Receivables $90,642,576 $77,793,316 $64,312,537 $78,007,446 $93,453,262
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $495,804,354 $524,976,863 $507,073,710 $415,596,782 $404,422,534
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 53.9% 52.3% 50.3% 41.2% 42.4%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 33.2% 33.4% 30.1% 26.4% 29.5%
Unrestricted net assets $464,783,055 $441,039,463 $445,873,101 $629,377,625 $570,740,825
Temporarily restricted net assets $320,704,806 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $307,035,805 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $627,740,611 $673,637,551 $741,930,688 $762,932,410 $684,476,224
Total net assets $1,092,523,666 $1,114,677,014 $1,187,803,789 $1,392,310,035 $1,255,217,049

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Karen Knudsen

Karen E. Knudsen, MBA, PhD, is the chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and its advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN). As a well-respected cancer leader, researcher, and advocate, Dr. Knudsen guides the organization on our mission to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer. She has a strong commitment to ensuring that all people can benefit from the impact of our work. Prior to joining ACS, Dr. Knudsen served as executive vice president of Oncology Services and enterprise director for Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health, one of only 71 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers recognized for their research and impact on cancer outcomes. Dr. Knudsen holds a bachelor's degree in biology from the George Washington University; a PhD in biological sciences from the University of California San Diego; and an MBA from Temple University Fox School of Business.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

American Cancer Society, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Brian Marlow

Terri McClements

Mark A. Goldberg

Katie A. Eccles

Michael T. Marquardt

Bruce N. Barron

Jose C. Buenaga

Jennifer R. Crozier

Asif Dhar

Carmen Guerra

Karen Etzkorn

Wayne A.I. Frederick

Kathleen Gallagher

Othman Laraki

Michelle M. Le Beau

Connie Lindsey

Edison T. Liu

Margaret McCaffery

Michael Pellini

Kenneth R. Stroll

Oyebode Taiwo

Robert Winn

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/01/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser