PLATINUM2024

Harvest Bridge

Equipping South Asian Christians to proclaim and demonstrate the Gospel

Grove City, PA   |  https://harvestbridge.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Harvest Bridge

EIN: 26-3403493


Mission

Harvest Bridge equips South Asian Christians to serve their communities more effectively. With our assistance, people and communities in Asia are transformed by the love of Christ.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Kate R.

Main address

P.O Box 284

Grove City, PA 16127 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Evangelical Fellowship International

EIN

26-3403493

Subject area info

Disaster relief

Economic development

Christianity

Human rights

International development

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Christians

Economically disadvantaged people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Christian (X20)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Globally, over 3 billion people belong to ethnic groups in which few people, if any, are followers of Jesus Christ. Due to their lack of contact with Christians, the overwhelming majority of these people will live their entire lives without hearing the Gospel, and without seeing it lived out authentically in the lives of Christ's followers. Nearly half of these 3 billion people reside in South Asia, a region that also struggles with persecution of religious minorities, some of the highest poverty rates in the world, and various other societal issues.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Church Planting, Evangelism & Discipleship

Using our extensive network, Harvest Bridge identifies indigenous missionaries who plant churches among unreached people groups (UPGs) throughout South Asia. We collect information about these missionaries, meet them individually, verify the authenticity of their work, and then help other nonprofits and individuals like you come alongside them.

Over 260 missionaries receive modest levels of monthly support through our efforts, not including grants we make for other ministry purposes.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Christians

Not only do our partners face natural disasters, violence, and political upheaval, they are ready to respond to these circumstances on behalf of others. When a disaster hits, our partners develop a plan to provide relief, and we supply financial resources through our emergency funds or grants from other organizations like Samaritan's Purse and UMCOR. Whether an earthquake in Nepal, flooding in Bangladesh, a cyclone in India, or a global pandemic, our partners are dedicated to alleviating the suffering of those impacted.

Our relief efforts typically provide emergency assistance to the hardest-hit areas and most overlooked groups, with the goal of helping families get back on their feet and resume healthy lives. Our partners also train communities to prepare effectively for future emergencies. From 2021-2023 alone, over 14,000 households about 72,000 men, women, and children received lifesaving relief supplies in the wake of natural disasters and the Covid-19 crisis.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with physical disabilities
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Perhaps the single greatest need in the church in Asia is for trained leaders to shepherd the growing number of people coming to the Christian faith. This need is especially acute in the countries where we work - many church leaders from poor backgrounds cannot afford much formal education.

We support locally-led pastor and lay church leader training by connecting pastors and missionaries to funded seminary education and/or shorter-term trainings and resources. In India, for example, several thousand local pastors and missionaries have been trained through regional conferences and HB-affiliated seminaries.

In many countries, we are blessed to come alongside church planting trainers who are trusted to lead by organizations like The Timothy Initiative and several denominations. We encourage collaboration with other ministries to cultivate accountability, teachability, church unity, and respect.

Population(s) Served
Christians
Adults

Asian nations are modernizing, creating new opportunities for well-educated and technologically savvy young people. But what about the poorest of the poor? Without schooling, these children face futures of hard manual labor at unlivable wages, begging, or crime.

For only $70, we can equip a child with remedial education, training in hygiene, and the school supplies they need to enter school and complete their first year. We've had the joy of seeing children replace low expectations with dreams of becoming engineers, businessmen, teachers and doctors.

The children newly enrolled in school sometimes need help to succeed because they missed earlier grades, their parents are illiterate and cannot help them, and/or they live in conditions not conducive to studying. This led to our School Success program. For about $30 per month, churches are able to make their facilities available as study centers in the evening. On average, between 350-550 children attend these programs each year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

We assist local ministries in establishing and carrying out economic development programs, including vocational training and support for microenterprises.

Our women's empowerment program, modeled on the Graduation Approach developed by Bangladesh-based international nonprofit BRAC, provides one-time investments to equip extremely poor women and their families with the skills, productive assets, and social support necessary to increase their incomes and escape poverty. To date, we have made 79 grants to women-led ultra-poor households across 10 regions of three countries; for those grants where enough time has elapsed to reliably estimate the program's impact, at least 82% of the women have escaped extreme poverty.

We have also supported a range of additional poverty alleviation projects, proposed and led by our Asian partners. Examples include vocational training schools that impart marketable skills to whole cohorts of participants, community savings groups, and more.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Using our extensive network, we identify local missionaries who are doing ministry throughout southern Asia. Whether they serve in a city of 20 million or a village of 100, the men and women we work with recognize the need for everyone to hear the Gospel.

Many work among unreached people groups (UPGs). They know what it costs to follow Christ, and they can honestly tell their own people that following Jesus is worth it.

More than 260 pastors and missionaries receive modest levels of monthly support through our efforts. We also make grants for tools that enhance the ministries of local leaders (backpacks, Bibles, sturdy shoes, rain jackets, flashlights, bicycles, etc.) both to our monthly-supported missionaries and to dozens of other Christian leaders in the region. Similarly, we assist local Christian leaders and believers under their care when they face persecution - be it by helping cover medical or legal costs, assisting families to relocate when necessary, or other assistance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Christians

One of the first ministries HB supported was Gypsy and Tribal Empowerment (GATE). Started in south India by a longtime partner, GATE reaches gypsy and tribal peoples with the Gospel and demonstrates Christ's love through holistic community development programs. Gypsies and tribals, generally considered to be the lowest of the low castes in India's social hierarchy, suffer from inadequate housing, low-paying jobs and poor nutrition. GATE's work includes helping these communities exercise their civil rights - assisting them in accessing land, education, job training, government ID cards, proper water and electricity, etc.

Over 20 gypsy and tribal communities (about 2,000 households) are served through GATE's 13 local missionaries and volunteers. 15 years ago, the number of gypsy/tribal children in school could have been counted on one hand. Now, about 75% of the children attend school. In the past 5-6 years, hundreds of gypsies and tribals have professed Christian faith as well.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new Christians baptized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Church Planting, Evangelism & Discipleship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

New followers of Jesus are baptized through the ministries of our local partners. Baptisms occur after thorough instruction in the faith.

Number of churches and house churches planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Church Planting, Evangelism & Discipleship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our local partners actively forge into new areas, planting churches that normally start as small house gatherings and grow as the number of Christians increases.

Number of church leaders trained through conferences and seminary training programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Pastor and Missionary Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Theological training is an enormous need in the church in southern Asia. Our partners' theological education programs mainly consist of training conferences and accelerated seminary courses.

Number of church planters who received ministry tools to aid their outreach efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Church Planting, Evangelism & Discipleship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We partner with other Christian NGOs to provide tools to enhance the ministries of missionaries. Tools include gospel tracts, backpacks, walking shoes, rain coats, flashlights, motorbikes, and more.

Number of Christians who received medical, legal and/or relocation assistance following persecution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Relief & Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Following Christ in the countries where we work often brings persecution from family and community. We work with other Christian NGOs to assist those who suffer various forms of persecution.

Number of Bibles distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Church Planting, Evangelism & Discipleship

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In many of the areas where our Asian partners serve, Bibles are either unavailable or too expensive for most people to afford. We distribute Bibles both to Christians and seekers.

Number of children from poor families who received monthly sponsorship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Children's Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In two of the countries where we work, our partners run homes to care for children who lost parents due to war, disease or neglect. These homes provide a caring, Christ-centered environment.

Number of children who participated in after-school tutoring programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Children's Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In many parts of South Asia, children need additional tutoring outside of school hours to overcome barriers to success. Our partners run quality after-school tutoring programs for this purpose.

Number of ultra-poor individuals who received vocational training, started or expanded their own business, and/or acquired employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Economic Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our micro-grants enable families to rise above extreme poverty by providing skills training, business coaching, productive assets such as livestock or sewing machines, and counseling.

Number of people served by disaster relief and community development programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humanitarian Relief & Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

When disasters such as floods, landslides, and earthquakes strike, our partners spring quickly into action. They also teach communities how to prepare for and mitigate the impact of disasters.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Harvest Bridge's goal is to equip local Christian ministries in South Asia to serve more effectively, so that Christ will be glorified and individuals in these countries will have greater physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being.

This encapsulates four key ideas:

1. Rather than sending our own staff to start ministries in Asia, we identify local ministries that have already proven to be effective, and we accelerate their work by equipping them with training, relationships, and material support.

2. Equipping local ministries is a high-impact strategy because it is respectful of local culture and it leverages local talent, knowledge, and other resources.

3. South Asia is a region where foreign missionary dollars go very far, because Christians are a tiny minority and extreme poverty is widespread.

4. Harvest Bridge's mission statement recognizes that the proclamation and demonstration of the Gospel go hand-in-hand.

Our vision is for unreached people groups to gain access to the Gospel, for poor and marginalized communities to be empowered and lifted out of poverty, and for underprivileged children to be equipped with the education and resources necessary to achieve their dreams.

Our strategy is to equip existing local ministries. Local people already understand the language and culture, and can work at much lower cost compared to western missionaries. We make it possible for these ministries to accelerate and expand their work by connecting them with like-minded organizations and training, sharing ideas, and providing material support, which includes both equipment and financial assistance. Following Christ's example, our partners both proclaim the Gospel and alleviate suffering through economic development programs for the extremely poor and marginalized, and various other humanitarian programs.

The benefits of working through local ministries are particularly high in the difficult places where we work - communities where both Christians and foreign visitors are rare. Westerners (Americans, Canadians, etc.) who travel to these areas can put themselves and their local hosts in danger. Furthermore, the presence of a westerner creates the expectation of handouts, which complicates the proclamation of the Gospel and attempts to minister to people holistically.

Harvest Bridge can be thought of as a switchboard connecting Asian ministries, international NGOs, and western donors. When our Asian partners encounter an opportunity or face a need, we can frequently find someone in our network that can help. When an international NGO makes plans to provide relief to survivors of earthquakes or floods, we can connect the NGO to our trusted Asian partners and help with the necessary paperwork. When a donor is interested in helping with a particular need in a given country, one or more local leaders in our network often has the burden and capacity to carry out work that aligns with the donor's interests.

Regardless of who proposes a particular project, we move forward with projects only if they are consistent with our local leaders' vision and our mission, and if they are sound in their methodology and anticipated impact.

Relationships are Harvest Bridge's most important asset. We work regularly with over 260 local missionary partners in six southern Asian countries, along with thousands of other local missionaries who have benefited from one or more of our programs.

We have a proven accountability structure with regular reporting requirements, financial safeguards, and country & regional leaders. Throughout Asia, we have access to local churches and talented people who understand the language and culture, and who help us to get God's work done in cost-effective, culturally appropriate ways.

Harvest Bridge also has strong relationships with other western NGOs. In 2023, nearly 40% of our work was financed by other humanitarian or missionary organizations. Our main limitation is that we are a small organization with limited finances and human resources in the US. Our goal, however, is not growth for its own sake - we want to be the size God wants us to be to most effectively come alongside our partners in Asia.

Harvest Bridge began in 2008 with only $1,325. By God's grace but with few worldly resources, we have grown into an organization that has trained thousands of pastors, educated hundreds of children, provided humanitarian aid to many thousands of disaster survivors, assisted hundreds of people and communities in escaping poverty, and more.

In 2023 alone, our partners accomplished the following and more with our support:

- Roughly 2,200 people began a relationship with Jesus through our local partners' ministries.

- 255 new churches and house churches were planted.

- Over 33,300 people received disaster assistance in the form of 2-5 weeks' worth of food and other necessities, following floods, earthquakes, and extreme cold.

- 50 vulnerable women received vocational training to increase their incomes, and 6 local church leaders received grants to invest in income-generating activities and boost their economic self-sufficiency.

- 42 new church-based community savings groups were started, to encourage financial responsibility and provide lump-sum loans to group members to start businesses and meet other needs when necessary.

- 288 girls, boys, and women were rescued from situations where they were in danger of being trafficked.

- 516 low-caste gypsy and tribal people received their citizenship ID cards for the first time, enabling them to better access benefits and leverage their rights.

- Over 400 children attended school and/or after-school tutoring programs with our partners' support.

- Over 2,600 people received medical care through clinics and operations organized by our partners.

- 23 missionaries and their families were helped with legal, medical, or relocation costs after being persecuted.

- 280 new church leaders were trained and equipped for ministry.

Much work remains. Harvest Bridge is still relatively unknown in the US, and limited in terms of both funds and personnel. We seek to increase funding for our ministry, and raise awareness in the US about God's work in southern Asia and the trials, courage, and accomplishments of the local church in the countries where we work.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Harvest Bridge
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

609.81

Average of 297.37 over 9 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.4

Average of 2 over 9 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7%

Average of 9% over 9 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Harvest Bridge

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Harvest Bridge

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Harvest Bridge

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Harvest Bridge’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $11,140 $42,305 $59,309 -$4,501 $15,091
As % of expenses 2.7% 9.7% 12.0% -0.7% 2.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $11,140 $42,305 $59,309 -$4,501 $15,091
As % of expenses 2.7% 9.7% 12.0% -0.7% 2.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $405,462 $466,140 $546,407 $692,612 $644,978
Total revenue, % change over prior year 15.3% 15.0% 17.2% 26.8% -6.9%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 4.2% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.6% 99.9% 95.8% 100.0% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.4% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $412,087 $436,598 $493,192 $620,638 $672,019
Total expenses, % change over prior year 31.2% 5.9% 13.0% 25.8% 8.3%
Personnel 33.5% 32.7% 24.1% 22.6% 27.1%
Professional fees 0.9% 0.9% 0.7% 0.6% 0.6%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 58.6% 56.7% 69.2% 72.5% 66.3%
All other expenses 7.0% 9.6% 5.9% 4.3% 6.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $412,087 $436,598 $493,192 $620,638 $672,019
One month of savings $34,341 $36,383 $41,099 $51,720 $56,002
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $446,428 $472,981 $534,291 $672,358 $728,021

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.3 2.3 3.6 3.5 3.4
Months of cash and investments 1.3 2.3 3.6 3.5 3.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.1 2.2 3.4 2.6 2.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $44,645 $83,363 $147,814 $180,090 $188,432
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $41,166 $29,058 $17,841 $57,262 $22,064
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.9% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1%
Unrestricted net assets $36,812 $79,117 $138,426 $133,925 $149,016
Temporarily restricted net assets $45,685 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $45,685 $32,922 $26,828 $103,303 $61,171
Total net assets $82,497 $112,039 $165,254 $237,228 $210,187

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Kate R.

Kate began volunteering with Harvest Bridge in 2011 as a college student. In 2014, she became Harvest Bridge's first full time employee, as Director of Mobilization. In 2020, she became Executive Director.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Harvest Bridge

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Harvest Bridge

Board of directors
as of 04/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Cliff Hovis

George Van Pelt Campbell

Grove City College

Katrina Wolinski

Cardiff Software

Cliff Hovis

Hovis Auto & Truck Supply

Austin Everett

Grossman Yanak & Ford LLP

Jieun Lee

Hope International

Karen Tuttle

Cru

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/09/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.