GOLD2024

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

aka Livingston Food Resource Center   |   Livingston, MT   |  http://www.livingstonfrc.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

EIN: 20-3550306


Mission

Our mission is to eliminate hunger in Livingston and Park County, Montana by: Acquiring and distributing healthful food to individuals and families in need; Playing a leadership role in developing a strong, sustainable, local food system; Addressing the root causes of hunger in Livingston and Park County; Supporting food-related economic development that drives the creation of jobs.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Kaya Patten-Fusselman

Main address

202 S 2nd St

Livingston, MT 59047 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-3550306

Subject area info

Community mental health care

Job training

Job creation and workforce development

Food banks

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Supper Club

The LFRC Pantry Supper Club provides nutritious dinners, five nights per week, to low/fixed income members of our community that can not prepare adequate meals for themselves. The meals are prepared in the Center’s Community Kitchen, using as many fresh, organic, Montana sourced ingredients as possible. They are then packed, frozen, and delivered each week to participating community members. The program is currently serving 65 individuals each week.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Chronically ill people
Terminally ill people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Backpack Buddies program targets elementary school children who depend on free and reduced-priced meals during the school week, but frequently face food insufficiency at home during weekends and holidays. LFRC volunteers pack bags of supplemental food that can be discreetly placed in students' backpacks on the last day of each school week. In collaboration with school administrators and teachers, we have identified and are providing over 1000 “Backpack Buddy” bags each month throughout Park County.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In collaboration with Farm to School of Park County and the Livingston School District, the Summer Lunch program provides nutritious lunch to all Livingston school-age children in need. Many of the children served receive free and reduced meals during the school year but face food insufficiency during the summer when the school meals are not available. The service is provided Monday through Friday, June through August, at multiple sites throughout Livingston. The LFRC manages Sacajawea Park, Gateway Museum and Green Acres Park, serving an average of 350 meals per week.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Our Local Food Procurement program provides pantry clients with locally sourced meats and produce. Our goal is to create equity in the local food system and change the idea of what "normal pantry food" looks like.

Population(s) Served

Mobile Food Pantries service those living in the most rural areas of our county. Once a month, LFRC travels to the towns of Emigrant, Wilsall and Clyde Park with a selection of non-perishable food, fresh produce, frozen meats, Community Kitchen scratch-made items, Community Bakery bread and dairy products. This program provides nutritional support to individuals and families who cannot make it into the food pantry because of a lack of transportation, the cost of gas or are not afforded the time to reach us during operational hours.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people

A program of the LFRC, the Community Bakery serves as a vital component of our mission to support the local community. Our retail store produces and sells a variety of artisan breads and pastries and all grains used are organic, grown and milled in Montana. The bakery bakes all of the bread that is distributed through the LFRC food pantry. Additionally, we provide sliced sandwich bread to food pantries statewide at no cost, extending our impact beyond our community. We offer training opportunities for individuals aspiring to pursue careers in baking, fostering skill development and economic empowerment.

Population(s) Served

The LFRC Healthy Families Tent provides increased access to local produce for low income families and information about additional community resources. Since 2021, the LFRC Fresh Produce Token Program has allocated over $25,000 of purchasing power to food insecure families with children aged five and younger, as well as pregnant women, to buy fresh produce from local farmers at the market. Not only does this encourage better nutrition in the home, it engages families in a community event that they often feel excluded from, while supporting the important work of our Montana farmers. In addition to Fresh Produce Tokens, the Healthy Families Tent is also where SNAP recipients can redeem their benefits to buy fresh eggs, produce and meat. For every SNAP dollar redeemed, the state matches this with a Double SNAP “dollar” that can be used exclusively for fresh produce.

Population(s) Served

The LFRC Kitchen and Community Bakery provide all the ingredients needed to cook a delicious Thanksgiving meal, at home, to over 400 low income households in Park County. The holidays are a time of additional stress for food insecure families, this program allows them the opportunity to share a traditional meal with their loved ones, strengthen bonds and feel supported during this season of gratitude and giving. Each household receives a turkey, local green beans processed by LFRC volunteers, scratch made gravy, chicken stock and cranberry sauce made in our Community Kitchen, dinner rolls provided by the Community Bakery and all the fixins’ needed to make the meal complete.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The satellite LFRC food pantries within Sleeping Giant Middle School and Park High School aim to reduce/eliminate hunger faced by students during the school day and on weekends and evenings when there is not adequate access to food in their homes. In-school food pantries, rather than weekend food Backpack programs, honor older students’ autonomy by allowing them to choose food they will eat. These pantries offer minimally processed scratch-made soups, peanut butter, jam and hummus from our Community Kitchen and preservative free bread from our Community Bakery. Students also have access to fresh fruit, breakfast items, pantry staples, hygiene products and school supplies.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Farmers
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Farmers

The LFRC Food Pantry is designed to be an equity forward compassionate shopping experience, empowering clients to choose from a variety of scratch-made frozen and nutritious ready to eat foods, and minimally processed shelf stable food, the procurement of which is guided by our local food purchasing and nutrition policies. Currently, our food pantry is providing nutritional support to over 500 unique households each month.

Population(s) Served
Farmers
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Farmers
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

53.22

Average of 89.35 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.1

Average of 11.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 10% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Livingston Food Pantry of Park County’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $213,669 $152,495 $611,294 $154,344 -$131,296
As % of expenses 33.4% 22.9% 55.4% 14.3% -8.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $148,028 $89,633 $525,668 $63,684 -$205,079
As % of expenses 21.0% 12.3% 44.2% 5.4% -12.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $853,245 $819,217 $1,714,461 $1,235,534 $1,463,780
Total revenue, % change over prior year 33.3% -4.0% 109.3% -27.9% 18.5%
Program services revenue 10.3% 9.8% 8.0% 21.1% 29.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.3% 0.5% 0.4% 0.2% 0.2%
Government grants 35.6% 31.6% 45.8% 31.9% 29.5%
All other grants and contributions 53.8% 58.0% 45.8% 46.8% 41.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $639,579 $666,711 $1,103,158 $1,081,184 $1,591,463
Total expenses, % change over prior year 24.1% 4.2% 65.5% -2.0% 47.2%
Personnel 31.9% 36.3% 28.0% 52.5% 52.3%
Professional fees 26.8% 25.7% 19.6% 19.5% 24.4%
Occupancy 5.6% 7.4% 6.4% 6.7% 4.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 42.0% 16.4% 14.8%
All other expenses 35.8% 30.7% 3.9% 5.0% 3.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $705,220 $729,573 $1,188,784 $1,171,844 $1,665,246
One month of savings $53,298 $55,559 $91,930 $90,099 $132,622
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $102,056 $74,902 $95,312 $206,616 $81,359
Total full costs (estimated) $860,574 $860,034 $1,376,026 $1,468,559 $1,879,227

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 11.1 12.4 13.2 12.8 7.1
Months of cash and investments 11.1 12.4 13.2 12.8 7.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 11.4 12.3 13.0 12.7 7.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $591,433 $688,245 $1,216,422 $1,157,636 $942,296
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $12,694 $0 $0 $10,000 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,272,316 $1,347,259 $1,442,569 $1,641,644 $1,723,005
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 16.9% 20.6% 25.2% 27.2% 30.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.5% 0.8% 1.2% 0.9% 0.8%
Unrestricted net assets $1,663,953 $1,753,127 $2,278,805 $2,342,489 $2,137,410
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $1,663,953 $1,753,127 $2,278,805 $2,342,489 $2,137,410

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Kaya Patten-Fusselman

Kaya holds a degree in Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems from Montana State University and brings over 10 years of nonprofit experience, passion for addressing the root causes of food insecurity, and knowledge of nutrition and local food systems. "Addressing food insecurity requires more than just feeding people - it starts with radical compassion, a vision for equity, and an understanding that getting community members connected with resources builds a stable road towards food security. That's what drew me to the organization initially, there's a holistic approach and desire to change systems. That, and an incredible team. I feel lucky to continue my work in food access with the LFRC."

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Livingston Food Pantry of Park County

Board of directors
as of 06/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Gordon Elley

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/11/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.