PLATINUM2023

Northern California Center for Well-Being

aka Center for Well-Being   |   Santa Rosa, CA   |  https://www.norcalwellbeing.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Northern California Center for Well-Being

EIN: 93-1144835


Mission

The Center for Well-Being’s (CWB) mission is to improve the health and well-being of our community through evidence-based health practices and innovative programs that advance health equity for all. Our vision is to improve community health through inclusive and just policies, programs, and services. To achieve this, we offer specialty clinical services and community-based empowerment programs, and each year we serve over 25,000 individuals of all ages. Our clinical services include nutrition therapy and a cardiac rehabilitation center to help individuals achieve optimal health. At a community level, we promote whole-person wellness by engaging with residents and offering education, support, and access to resources to help them be well.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Karissa Moreno

Main address

101 Brookwood Ave Suite A

Santa Rosa, CA 95404 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

93-1144835

Subject area info

Health

Medical support services

Public health

Human services

Population served info

Children and youth

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Project TRUE

Project TRUE (“Teens R U Educated?”) is a youth-driven, peer health education program that empowers youth to make healthy decisions about alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (ATODs). It serves over 1,100 youth annually.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students receiving information on alcohol and other drug use

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Project TRUE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

STRATEGIC PILLAR # 1:
PROMOTE HEALTH EQUITY IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
-Serve, educate, convene, and lead our communities to reduce health disparities-
A. Become the Center of Excellence for Community Health Workers (CHWs).
B. Train and deploy CHWs and youth to reach vulnerable populations, to address social determinants of health, and to reduce health disparities.
C. Increase education programs and outreach to underserved populations that address structural inequities and promote health equity.
D. Expand upstream programs for families with children under 5 (first 1000 days) and youth in the communities we serve.

STRATEGIC PILAR # 2:
ALIGN CLINICAL SERVICE DELIVERY TO MATCH TOMORROW’S REALITIES
-Meet the evolving needs of individuals with chronic disease risks by utilizing
innovative delivery models and new operational standards-
A. Ensure that our clinical classes evolve to meet the needs of our patient population and key community partners by addressing a variety of chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension in addition to diabetes).
B. Offer a broader range of access points to existing and potential patients, piloting service delivery beyond historical service area.
C. Optimize the use of technology, scheduling, and physical space to enable efficient growth, expand access to services, and ensure safe, high-value patient care.
D. Evaluate and design clinical services and strategies to ensure long-term fiscal sustainability (ex. capitation arrangements, reimbursement rates).

STRATEGIC PILLAR #3
EXPAND THE CENTER’S VISIBILITY AND REACH
-Develop and grow the Center’s recognition, reputation, and impact-
A. Enhance visibility and understanding of NCCWB’s programs services, quality, and outcomes through proactive marketing and PR.
B. Continue to develop the funding and revenue streams to meet emerging program and service needs.
C. Build and implement a donor development strategy.

STRATEGIC PILLAR # 1:
PROMOTE HEALTH EQUITY IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
-Provide bimonthly CHW Network Meetings and at least 2 community-wide CHW Core Competency Trainings annually through Q4 2023.
-Establish at least one new Project TRUE chapter (Petaluma or Santa Rosa).
-Access and utilize community needs assessments to inform our community-based work.
-Launch an upstream pilot to serve underserved populations via CHWs that address social determinants such as food insecurity in collaboration with one or more community partners and/or coalition (e.g. Hearts of Sonoma, Ceres Project).
-Create an internship/volunteer pipeline to meet the needs of the community, and to offer practical experience for participants through nutrition education classes and community engagement (volunteer candidates include CHW training graduates, students, and/or community members).

STRATEGIC PILAR # 2:
ALIGN CLINICAL SERVICE DELIVERY TO MATCH TOMORROW’S REALITIES
-Provide nutrition and cardiac rehabilitation services to at least 1,200 unique patients via 10,000 visits annually. Strategies to support this are: (a) expanded provider outreach, (b) patient recruitment and retention strategies, and (c) administrative workflow improvements.
-Research and implement strategies to address accessibility for patients with limited technological access or capacity, and/or mobility.
-Perform an assessment of current CWB nutrition class offerings and identify additional programs that would benefit our community, including a class specifically related to hypertension. By Q1 2022 launch hypertension class.
-Launch a broad provider outreach campaign to serve patients outside of Sonoma County by expanding clinical services via Telehealth, connecting with 5 – 10 new referral sites annually.
-Identify strategic pathways and key partnerships to advocate at a policy-level for the reimbursement of CHWs who perform chronic disease health coaching as an evidence-based methodology to improve patient health outcomes.
-Expand access to at least three new services areas via Telehealth nutrition services and/or virtual Phase III cardiac rehabilitation classes to meet the needs of rural, remote, and underserved populations outside of Sonoma County (e.g. Marin, Yolo, Napa, Lake, Mendocino and/or other Northern California counties).

STRATEGIC PILLAR #3
EXPAND THE CENTER’S VISIBILITY AND REACH
-Expand CWB representation in at least three local, state, and/or national coalitions (e.g.: Health Action, California Primary Care Association, National Association of Community Health Workers) to advance the visibility of the Center’s programs and services, engage collaborative partners, and identify future funding opportunities that address health inequities in our communities through innovative and upstream projects.
-Develop an outreach and communication plan to key stakeholders, community partners, funders, and providers that promotes NCCWB’s programs and services, celebrates success stories, and sha

The Center for Well-Being employs a dynamic, mission-driven, diverse, and accomplished team with the knowledge, skills, proven expertise, and lived experience that enables us to accomplish our goals. We have an outstanding track record for achieving all strategic goals and grant-funded deliverables, a dedicated board of directors that provide fiduciary and quality oversight, and long-standing partnerships within our community with whom we intentionally align our work.

STRATEGIC PILLAR #1: Promote Health Equity in Northern California 
-Apply to funding opportunities to expand services and resources to children and their families who have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 via CHW-driven work.  Achieved!
-Provide bimonthly CHW Network Meetings and at least 2 community-wide CHW Core Competency Trainings annually through Q4 2023. Achieved!
-Establish at least one new Project TRUE chapter (Petaluma or Santa Rosa).  Achieved!
-Access and utilize community needs assessments to inform our community-based work. Achieved!
-Launch an upstream pilot to serve underserved populations via CHWs that address social determinants. Achieved!
-Create an internship/volunteer pipeline to meet the needs of the community, and to offer practical experience for participants through nutrition education classes and community engagement.  Achieved!

STRATEGIC PILLAR #2: Align Clinical Service Delivery to Match Tomorrow’s Realities
-Provide nutrition and cardiac rehabilitation services to at least 1,200 unique patients via 10,000 visits annually. Achieved!
-Research and implement strategies to address accessibility for patients with limited technological access or capacity, and/or mobility. Achieved!
-Perform an assessment of current CWB nutrition class offerings and identify additional programs that would benefit our community. Achieved!
-Launch a broad provider outreach campaign to serve patients outside of Sonoma County by expanding clinical services via Telehealth. Achieved!
-Explore contract expansion with new health plans. In Progress/ Future Need.
-Identify strategic pathways and key partnerships to advocate at a policy-level for the reimbursement of CHWs who perform chronic disease health coaching as an evidence-based methodology to improve patient health outcomes. Achieved!
-Expand access to at least three new services areas via Telehealth nutrition services. Achieved!

STRATEGIC PILLAR #3: Expand the Center’s Visibility and Reach
-Expand CWB representation in at least three local, state, and/or national coalitions. Achieved!
-Develop an outreach and communication plan to key stakeholders, community partners, funders, and providers that promotes NCCWB’s programs and services. In progress.
-Design and launch NCCWB’s updated website to include current programs, trainings, clinical services and classes, success stories, and job opportunities. Achieved!
-Increase NCCWB visibility within the communities we serve by collaborating with other CBOs and community groups during events. In progress.

We are currently embarking on a strategic planning process for 2024 - 2026.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Northern California Center for Well-Being
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.85

Average of 6.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16

Average of 5.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 19% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Northern California Center for Well-Being

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Northern California Center for Well-Being

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Northern California Center for Well-Being

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Northern California Center for Well-Being’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$296,492 $280,166 $609,138 $992,101 $888,970
As % of expenses -15.5% 15.8% 38.8% 52.1% 39.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$309,712 $274,761 $608,373 $978,819 $887,677
As % of expenses -16.1% 15.5% 38.7% 51.0% 39.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,614,864 $2,104,518 $2,233,961 $2,574,606 $3,251,959
Total revenue, % change over prior year -7.1% 30.3% 6.2% 15.2% 26.3%
Program services revenue 47.3% 61.7% 37.2% 32.5% 15.7%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 10.7% 41.6% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 52.7% 38.3% 52.1% 25.9% 84.3%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,907,123 $1,772,397 $1,569,261 $1,905,051 $2,229,386
Total expenses, % change over prior year 11.8% -7.1% -11.5% 21.4% 17.0%
Personnel 64.6% 76.3% 76.8% 70.2% 68.0%
Professional fees 15.5% 2.6% 4.4% 6.4% 4.0%
Occupancy 8.5% 10.6% 9.0% 8.5% 6.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 11.4% 10.5% 9.8% 15.0% 21.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,920,343 $1,777,802 $1,570,026 $1,918,333 $2,230,679
One month of savings $158,927 $147,700 $130,772 $158,754 $185,782
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $10,949 $2,015 $0 $5,460
Total full costs (estimated) $2,079,270 $1,936,451 $1,702,813 $2,077,087 $2,421,921

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.0 2.4 9.6 12.6 16.0
Months of cash and investments 1.0 2.4 9.6 12.6 16.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.3 2.2 7.1 12.1 15.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $160,381 $356,092 $1,260,139 $2,003,347 $2,970,510
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $133,546 $251,061 $287,491 $259,211 $290,851
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $204,408 $215,357 $217,372 $220,084 $225,544
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 96.9% 94.5% 94.0% 98.8% 97.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 23.5% 12.5% 8.3% 6.9% 12.4%
Unrestricted net assets $57,193 $331,954 $940,327 $1,919,146 $2,806,823
Temporarily restricted net assets $175,492 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $175,492 $225,167 $519,203 $196,657 $313,593
Total net assets $232,685 $636,645 $1,459,530 $2,115,803 $3,120,416

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No Yes No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Karissa Moreno

Karissa Moreno serves as our Executive Director. Born and raised in Sonoma County, Moreno has advocated for at-risk and vulnerable populations for over 20 years. She earned her Bachelor’s in Cultural Anthropology from UC Santa Barbara and her Master’s in Social Science from the University of Chicago. With over 20 years of community health leadership experience, Moreno is committed to eliminating health disparities for underserved and vulnerable populations, approaching health care through the lens of whole-person wellness. Prior to returning to Sonoma County, Moreno served as Chief Operating Officer of Clínica Monseñor Oscar A. Romero in Los Angeles. Additionally, she served as Chief Operating Officer of Livingston Community Health in Merced and Clinic Manager for Santa Rosa Community Health Centers for seven years.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Northern California Center for Well-Being

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Northern California Center for Well-Being

Board of directors
as of 07/28/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Surani Kwan

Sutter

Term: 2021 - 2023

L. Reed Walker

Retired physician

Monica Ferguson

St. Joseph Health

Nicholas Hansen

Moss Adams

Jo Sandersfeld

Retired (St. Joseph)

Kim Petty

Healthcare Strategy

Yudith Vargas

Santa Rosa Community Health

Carme Luis

Global HR

Andrew Spalding

Spaulding, McCullough,& Tansil LLP

Brian Defour

Sonoma County Schools

Jane Read

Petaluma Health Center

Brittany Lobo

Sonoma County Department of Health Services

Monica Most

Providence St. Joseph Health

Michael Woon-Fat

Kaiser

Gary Hochman

HR Matrix

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/14/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.