PLATINUM2023

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Heard. Understood. Believed in.

Houston, TX   |  www.thehubhouston.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The HUB Houston, Inc.

EIN: 47-4750764


Mission

Mission The HUB Houston is a relationship-centered educational program for young adults with neurological differences. We bring belonging to life in a community where members are Heard, Understood, and Believed in. Our program Faculty believe belonging to a community is at the heart of learning. The HUB aspires to be a welcoming, joyful center where interactive relationship practice is central and where each member is accepted and cherished just as they are. Our values are: Community, Tolerance, Respect, Transparency, Care. Vision The HUB Houston envisions a world of belonging for all. The HUB Houston is committed to fostering personal growth and unlocking individual potential in a relationship centered community for teenagers and young adults.

Notes from the nonprofit

“I gathered passionate people together to create something wonderful, and here we are helping the next generation share their voice with the world!” Colleen Russo, Co-Founder & Executive Director

Ruling year info

2015

Co-Founder & Executive Director

Coach Colleen Russo

Main address

4209 Galway Lane

Houston, TX 77080 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4750764

Subject area info

Mental and behavioral disorders

Youth development

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Adults

Young adults

People with learning disabilities

NTEE code info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The HUB Houston is a relationship-centered educational program serving neurodiverse teenagers and young adults The HUB was incorporated in July 2015 responding to the demands of families within the neurodiverse community for an alternative to public education and the more expensive therapeutic programs in the area. We bring belonging to life in a community where members are Heard, Understood and Believed in. We aspire to be a welcoming, joyful center where interactive relationship practice is central. Our students are often disenfranchised from normal – or neurotypical -community events, social activities, and workforce inclusion because of their differences. The HUB is striving to bring awareness to the community that our neurodiverse population is as vital, contributing, and as capable as others outside of this neurodiverse population.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

High School

A comprehensive program to support, complement, and deepen home school curriculum within a community.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People with learning disabilities

Post graduate aged members - Full Time

A comprehensive program to support young adults, including community, education, and vocational coaching.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
People with learning disabilities

Post graduate aged members - Part Time
A relationship-based community center for social engagement, providing afternoon, evening, and weekend offerings.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with learning disabilities

Where we work

Awards

Lona Wong Service Award 2018

Blessings in a Backpack

Classroom Champ Award to Coach Russo 2017

Houston Dynamo

HUB Houston Day 2017

City of Houston

Innovators Award for our Employability Program 2020

Houston Business Journal

Nominate a Star Award to Coach Russo 2020

Broadway at The Hobby Center

Unsung Heroes Award to Coach Russo 2020

Discovery Green & KPRC

Affiliations & memberships

Special Schools Coalition 2015

Private School Review 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

High School

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We receive funding to ensure all of our students are included in field trips.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The HUB aspires to be a welcoming, joyful center where interactive relationship practice is central and where each member is accepted and cherished just as they are. At The HUB, social relationships flourish, academic growth continues and professional/employability skills are taught and practiced.
Our High School program uses a project-based academic model. Our goal is to help these teenagers discover their incredible gifts, and help them show these gifts to the world.
Life 101 is our continuing education program for post graduates up to age 26. This program aims to assist the young adult in life skill enhancement, educational support for collage or trade schools, and an employability program to help them enter the workforce.
The HUB addresses the need for post graduate young adults who do not have a place to belong, or a community of friends. Through our evening program, Club HUB, we help build relationships for young adults ages 18-36.

1. Imperative: Strengthen financial position to establish a dedicated Scholarship Fund
2. Imperative: Define, refine and enhance a distinctive post graduate service delivery model for HUB members.
3. Imperative: Define and develop a method to measure the impact of The HUB Houston programming on members.
Secondary initiatives:
• Improve the visibility of The HUB Houston in our community – via community outreach and targeted online efforts
• Enhance communication between two groups (1) internally among staff and (2) externally with parents (Director of Operations should already have targets in this area)
• Improve expertise in core financial management operations

1. Imperative: Strengthen financial position to establish a dedicated Financial Assistance Fund
• Set financial target
• Fund scholarship target
o 10% of luncheon proceeds
o Foundation Grants
o Restricted Gifts
• Define goals of scholarship program
o Improve diversity of HUB members
o Enhance the ability to accept students unable to pay
o Supplement for existing families who struggle to pay
• Develop Financial Assistance Program including type of scholarship offerings, eligibility guidelines, application process, and review committee.
o Partial financial assistance at this point, no full scholarships
o Guidelines set & processes in place
 Families apply through 3rd party agency (Independent School Management’s Financial Aid for School Tuition (FAST) to process applications
 After vetted, information passed on to Financial Assistance Committee to determine neediest families and amount to award
o Review Committee
 Committee is comprised of: Executive Director, Board President, & Director of Operations
2. Imperative: Define, refine and enhance a distinctive post graduate service delivery model for HUB members.
• Develop a differentiated program model that intentionally integrates a distinctive relational and personal curriculum (Journey of Belonging) with programs in academic and professional competence
o Life 101 – Employability program, life skills, professional skills
• Refine The HUB approach to vocational support, including job placement, career growth after placement and schedule coordination.
o Employability Specialist hired
o Employability Program is evolving, but our success in forming relationships with potential employers is growing
3. Imperative: Define and develop a method to measure the impact of The HUB Houston programming on members.
• Develop a repeatable coaching process and method to measure Journey of Belonging
• Define a methodology to assess the impact of programs in academic and professional competence
• Incorporate a diverse methodology for measurement (quantitative and qualitative) that matches The HUB Houston’s intended impact such as (1) faster more frequent feedback loops between coach, member and family, (2) rich media (e.g. photos and videos), and (3) metrics that measure process.

1. Imperative: Strengthen financial position to establish a dedicated Financial Assistance Fund
• Set financial target
• Fund scholarship target
o 10% of luncheon proceeds
o Foundation Grants
o Restricted Gifts
• Define goals of scholarship program
o Improve diversity of HUB members
o Enhance the ability to accept students unable to pay
o Supplement for existing families who struggle to pay
• Develop Financial Assistance Program including type of scholarship offerings, eligibility guidelines, application process, and review committee.
o Partial financial assistance at this point, no full scholarships
o Guidelines set & processes in place
 Families apply through 3rd party agency (Independent School Management’s Financial Aid for School Tuition (FAST) to process applications
 After vetted, information passed on to Financial Assistance Committee to determine neediest families and amount to award
o Review Committee
 Committee is comprised of: Executive Director, Board President, & Director of Operations

2. Imperative: Define, refine and enhance a distinctive post graduate service delivery model for HUB members.
• Developed a differentiated program model that intentionally integrates a distinctive relational and personal curriculum (Journey of Belonging) with programs in academic and professional competence
o Life 101 – Employability program, life skills, professional skills
• Refine The HUB approach to vocational support, including job placement, career growth after placement and schedule coordination.
o Employability Specialist hired
o Employability Program is evolving, but our success in forming relationships with potential employers is growing

3. Imperative: Define and develop a method to measure the impact of The HUB Houston programming on members.
• Developed a repeatable coaching process and method to measure Journey of Belonging
• Defined a methodology to assess the impact of programs in academic and professional competence
• Incorporate a diverse methodology for measurement (quantitative and qualitative) that matches The HUB Houston’s intended impact such as (1) faster more frequent feedback loops between coach, member and family, (2) rich media (e.g. photos and videos), and (3) metrics that measure process.

Secondary initiatives:
• Improve the visibility of The HUB Houston in our community – via community outreach and targeted online efforts
Attend monthly Resource Fairs for the neurodiverse community
Media coverage from on-line, print & television, and will continue to increase yearly
• Enhance communication between two groups (1) internally among staff and (2) externally with parents (Director of Operations should already have targets in this area)
• Improve expertise in core financial management operations
o Adapted QuickBooks as accounting system
o Hired outside CPA
o Auto-invoicing began Fall of 2018
o G&A hired for payroll, benefits management

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Neurodiverse teenagers and young adults.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We added additional instructors to help our population with loss of learning due to the pandemic.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Builds trust and confidence in our programs - as well as transparency.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The HUB Houston, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.25

Average of 46.42 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.6

Average of 9.2 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 26% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of The HUB Houston, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2015 2016 2017 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $289,751 $103,834 $31,823 $232,615 $57,720
As % of expenses 135.2% 15.0% 8.7% 24.8% 5.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $289,093 $100,838 $30,325 $230,135 $50,291
As % of expenses 134.5% 14.5% 8.2% 24.5% 4.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $472,590 $816,340 $397,917 $1,168,940 $1,142,545
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 72.7% -51.3% 0.0% -2.3%
Program services revenue 67.9% 78.2% 65.9% 73.4% 71.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 32.1% 21.8% 34.1% 26.6% 28.4%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $214,276 $694,218 $366,094 $936,325 $1,084,825
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 224.0% -47.3% 0.0% 15.9%
Personnel 67.0% 78.9% 90.4% 79.9% 78.5%
Professional fees 0.6% 6.3% 2.3% 0.9% 1.2%
Occupancy 9.5% 1.3% 1.1% 6.0% 5.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.2%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 22.9% 13.5% 6.2% 13.3% 14.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2015 2016 2017 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $214,934 $697,214 $367,592 $938,805 $1,092,254
One month of savings $17,856 $57,852 $30,508 $78,027 $90,402
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $17,305 $0 $0 $0 $347,443
Total full costs (estimated) $250,095 $755,066 $398,100 $1,016,832 $1,530,099

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2015 2016 2017 2019 2020
Months of cash 15.3 6.6 13.5 10.2 9.6
Months of cash and investments 15.3 6.6 13.5 10.2 9.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 15.3 6.5 13.4 9.9 5.4
Balance sheet composition info 2015 2016 2017 2019 2020
Cash $272,446 $379,145 $412,117 $794,336 $868,617
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $27 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $17,305 $17,305 $17,305 $17,305 $364,544
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 3.8% 21.1% 29.8% 64.2% 5.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.7% 0.9% 2.4% 31.7%
Unrestricted net assets $289,093 $389,931 $420,256 $781,276 $831,567
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $289,093 $389,931 $420,256 $781,276 $831,567

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2015 2016 2017 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Founder & Executive Director

Coach Colleen Russo

Colleen Russo, also known as “Coach," has over 40 years of experience in education. She was born and raised in Queens, NY. She started her career as a physical education teacher and quickly moved into the coaching realm. Prior to co-founding The HUB Houston, Colleen spent 17 years working at The Monarch Institute. There, she served as a Professional Educator Mentor, Life Coach, and Community Coordinator to help students connect with one another and build community. Colleen's passion and respect for her students inspired her to create a program where young people would thrive and find acceptance in a community setting, where every voice would be Heard, Understood and Believed in. At The HUB Houston, Colleen's mission is to guide and empower young people not only to be competent individuals but also to make meaningful contributions to the world.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

The HUB Houston, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Patti Everitt

SMITH & Associates

Term: 2022 - 2024

Kelley Hodges

Community Activist

Colleen Russo

The HUB Houston Inc.

Sharon Buckle

Attorney

Michelle Hunt

Retired

Patti Everitt

SMITH & Associates

Rob Eppolito

VideoMojo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/28/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.