PLATINUM2024

Prokids

Advocates for Children

Cincinnati, OH   |  http://www.prokids.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Prokids

EIN: 31-1020021


Mission

ProKids mission is to mobilize the local community to break the vicious cycle of child abuse and neglect by investing in the promise of these children. We do this by recruiting, training, and supporting community volunteers to become Court Appointed Special Advocates, known as CASA Volunteers. Our dedicated CASA Volunteers speak up for abused and neglected children, both in and out of court, advocating for them in all areas of their lives, and ultimately guiding them into safe environments where they can thrive.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Ms. Tracy Cook

Main address

222 West 7th Street

Cincinnati, OH 45202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1020021

Subject area info

Mental health care

Legal services

Human rights

Foster care

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Foster and adoptive parents

Foster and adoptive children

Transitioning children

Low-income people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ProKids is a nonprofit organization in Hamilton County, Ohio, that mobilizes the community by training and supporting volunteers who break the vicious cycle of child abuse and neglect. ProKids Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA Volunteers) speak up for abused and neglected children, guiding them to safe environments where they can thrive. ProKids’ meets the urgent need for intensive, individualized advocacy on behalf of the best interest of abused and neglected children in Hamilton County’s child protection system who have experienced significant trauma and severe abuse. Sadly, once a child is removed from their home, their troubles are far from over. Studies indicate that trauma from abuse and neglect can impair the development and functioning of a child’s brain and nervous system. This often leads to a complex combination of physical, mental, developmental, and behavioral issues that, if left untreated, can last a lifetime.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CASA University

ProKids nationally recognized CASA volunteer recruitment, screening, and training program. The program includes 30-hours of pre-service training, 12-hours of in-service specialized training, and 12-hours of annual continuing education.

Population(s) Served

Building Blocks addresses the needs of infants and young children ages birth - 5 with an emphasis on medical needs, early childhood development/trauma, and kindergarten readiness. This is the largest and fastest growing population in foster care, and the most at-risk for experiencing severe abuse.

Population(s) Served

Framing Futures addresses the needs of children ages 6-13 with an emphasis on education and socio-emotional development. Children are connected to literacy services, assessed for learning disabilities, and provided with an ‘Individualized Education Plan (IEP), when necessary.

Population(s) Served

Launch addresses the needs of teens 14+ who are at risk of aging out of foster care without a permanent home. Teens are empowered with the resources and support necessary to graduate high school, plan for adulthood, and achieve self-sufficiency. This age group is the most at-risk of struggling with poverty and homelessness.

Population(s) Served

Steps to Peace addresses the needs of children who are survivors of domestic violence and/or severe abuse. All children are screened for signs of trauma and connected with the necessary services to support their mental health and healing.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

85% of children with mental health needs will be identified and clinically assessed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, Victims of crime and abuse, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

90% of parents and children will have access to interventions and services when needed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

70% of children/youth will attend school 90% of the school year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

*ProKids is aware that the pandemic created barriers to recording attendance and disrupted the consistency of some school services and interventions. ProKids continues to monitor attendance.

90% of children who have experienced abuse and/or trauma receive individualized planning, intensive services, monitoring, and/or linkage to additional services.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

80% of children will experience stability while under court jurisdiction and assigned to ProKids.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

70% of siblings will be placed together if they are not a threat to each other.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

95% of children will be safe while under court jurisdiction and assigned to ProKids.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

95% of children will experience stability after their case is closed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Foster and adoptive children, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

70% of children will be placed with siblings when their case is closed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Foster and adoptive children, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

90% of children will receive appropriate educational placement and achieve developmental milestones.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

90% of children will live in a permanent, safe home when their case is closed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

95% of children will be safe from abuse and neglect after their case closed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Foster and adoptive children, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

75% youth aging out of foster care will have a connection to a supportive adult other than the CASA Volunteer or ProKids staff.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

50% of youth aging out of foster care will be employed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

85% of youth aging out of foster care will have a place to live.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse, Foster and adoptive children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

65% of youth aging out of foster care will graduate from high school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, At-risk youth, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Intermediate Outcomes
90% of children and parents will have access to interventions and services when needed.
85% of children with mental health needs will be identified and clinically assessed.
90% of children/youth who have experienced abuse and/or trauma will receive individualized planning, intensive services, monitoring, and/or linkage to additional services.
70% of children will attend school 90% of the school year.
70% of children will be placed with siblings while under court jurisdiction and assigned to ProKids.
80% of children will experience stability while under court jurisdiction and assigned to ProKids.
95% of children will be safe from abuse and neglect while under court jurisdiction and assigned to ProKids.

Longer-Term Outcomes
95% of children will experience stability after their case is closed.
90% of children will be on grade level and/or achieve developmental milestones.
70% of children will be placed with siblings after their case is closed.
90% of children will live in a permanent, safe nurturing home after their case is closed.
95% of children will not experience a recurrence of abuse or neglect after their case is closed.

Aging-Out Specific Outcomes
75% of youth aging out of foster care will have a connection to a supportive adult other than the CASA Volunteer or ProKids staff.
50% of youth aging out of foster care will be employed.
85% of youth aging out of foster care will have a place to live.

Advocacy Teams – Federal law requires that juvenile courts, which have jurisdiction over child protection cases, appoint a ‘Guardian ad Litem’ to advocate on behalf of a child’s best interest. In Hamilton County, this advocate is appointed either through the Public Defender’s Office or ProKids. When assigned to ProKids, children are provided with an Advocacy Team, including a highly trained CASA Volunteer, their supervisor known as a CASA Manager, and a ProKids staff attorney.

The Advocacy Team’s top priority is the child’s well-being. They launch a thorough and ongoing investigation into the child’s life and passionately and persuasively advocate for services and support to meet the full scope of the child’s needs and, when appropriate, those of their parent/caregiver. As full legal parties, with the same legal standing as the county caseworker and biological parent, the Advocacy Team represents the child’s best interests at all court hearings, makes recommendations for services and placement, oversees the execution of all court orders, and reports on child/family progress. The team takes necessary legal action in pursuit of the child’s best interests including who should ultimately have custody of the child.

Age-appropriate, specialized advocacy is provided through the following programs:

• Building Blocks- addresses the needs of infants and young children ages birth - 5 with an emphasis on medical needs, early childhood development/trauma, and kindergarten readiness.
• Framing Futures- addresses the needs of children ages 6-13 with an emphasis on education and socio-emotional development.
• Launch- addresses the needs of teens 14+ who are at risk of aging out of foster care without a permanent home with an emphasis on high school and self-sufficiency.

Steps to Peace- addresses the needs of children who are survivors of domestic violence and/or severe abuse. All children served by ProKids are screened for signs of trauma and connected with the necessary services to support their mental health and healing. Since 2014, ProKids has also trained all JFS caseworkers and Juvenile Court magistrates on trauma and domestic violence.

Hamilton County Child Protection Collaborative- a collaboration between HCJFS leadership, Juvenile Court, the Prosecutor’s Office, Public Defender’s Office and ProKids to improve/shorten the court process and prevent all children from languishing in the system & improve their outcomes.

Hamilton County Training Alliance- a partnership between ProKids, JFS, Juvenile Court, and the Public Defender’s Office with the objective to ensure that all front-line child protection professionals have the skills, information, and resources to effectively help our community’s children.

ProKids is positioned to address this need because we are the only non-profit organization that provides advocacy on behalf of the best interest of abused and neglected children in Hamilton County’s child protection system. Over the last 40+ years, ProKids has built an outstanding reputation and strong working relationships with the Juvenile Court, Hamilton County Job & Family Services, the Public Defender’s Office, Prosecutor’s Office, and a wide variety of service providers. Our staff are experts in their fields and our child-centered, early intervention advocacy methods have been proven to be highly effective in improving outcomes for abused and neglected children. Furthermore, ProKids has a strong track record of successful and sustainable growth.

ProKids Advocacy Teams often have the longest tenure of anyone assigned to a child’s case and are often the ones with the most comprehensive knowledge of the child’s family history and unique circumstances. The key factor that sets ProKids apart from other organizations are our CASA Volunteers who make a real, measurable, and lasting difference in each child’s life. Unlike other child protection system professionals, CASA Volunteers are typically assigned to just one case at a time, remain on the case for its duration, and have the time and resources to become an expert on the child as an individual. They are typically the only consistent adult in the child’s life not paid to be there.

The CASA Volunteer visits the child at least once a month (twice for infants and young children) in all environments in which they spend time including their foster home, visits with biological family, daycare, doctor’s offices, school, etc. During this time, they closely monitor and investigate a child’s health status, safety, care-giver interactions, levels of environmental stimulation, and whether developmental milestones are being reached. CASA Volunteers also maintain regular contact and facilitate open communication with all those involved in a child’s life including foster and biological parents, relatives, caseworkers, therapists, teachers, etc. This holistic approach allows the CASA Volunteer to identify issues before they become problems - preventing delays in cases and keeping children from languishing in the foster care system.

ProKids has a proven track record of successful and sustainable growth. In the last decade, ProKids has doubled the number of children served while not only maintaining but improving our child centered outcomes. Despite a national decline in volunteering, which has been in overdrive since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, ProKids continues to have a consistent number of CASA Volunteers each year. Significant time and resources are invested into recruiting and training effective CASA Volunteers and the return on investment is substantial - while the average volunteer remains at an organization for less than a year, the average volunteer remains with ProKids for at least five years and serves on multiple cases.

The following results represent a 10-year average of our outcomes:

95% of children with mental health needs have been identified and clinically assessed.
97% of children and parents have had access to interventions and services when needed.
85% of children have been stable while assigned to ProKids.
99% of children have been safe from abuse and neglect while assigned to ProKids.
100% of children have been stable after their case closed.
91% of children have been guided into a safe, permanent, and nurturing home.
100% of children have been safe from abuse and neglect after their case closed.

As we move forward, we’re dedicated to maintaining this growth trajectory and continuing to increase our programming capacity to meet the needs of children in our community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Prokids
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 ProKids 2019 990 2019 2019 Audit 2018 Audited Financials 2018 990
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.66

Average of 2.99 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.9

Average of 2.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19%

Average of 19% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Prokids

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Prokids

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Prokids

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Prokids’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $907,485 $1,798,236 $1,448,869 $2,429,146 -$417,931
As % of expenses 39.0% 69.1% 50.6% 81.7% -13.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $900,746 $1,787,409 $1,433,609 $2,408,525 -$443,172
As % of expenses 38.6% 68.4% 49.8% 80.4% -13.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,871,643 $5,592,080 $5,866,755 $5,485,514 $4,363,898
Total revenue, % change over prior year -7.8% 44.4% 4.9% -6.5% -20.4%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 4.3% 3.6% 2.1% 4.0% 5.2%
Government grants 8.0% 5.9% 5.5% 11.1% 3.3%
All other grants and contributions 101.6% 71.0% 79.7% 63.7% 130.7%
Other revenue -13.9% 19.5% 12.7% 21.2% -39.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,324,015 $2,603,745 $2,865,293 $2,973,394 $3,225,536
Total expenses, % change over prior year 9.3% 12.0% 10.0% 3.8% 8.5%
Personnel 84.3% 86.4% 88.3% 88.4% 84.2%
Professional fees 2.9% 2.5% 2.7% 3.8% 3.3%
Occupancy 1.9% 1.7% 1.4% 1.4% 1.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.5% 0.3% 0.7% 0.8% 1.5%
All other expenses 10.5% 9.2% 6.9% 5.6% 9.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,330,754 $2,614,572 $2,880,553 $2,994,015 $3,250,777
One month of savings $193,668 $216,979 $238,774 $247,783 $268,795
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $426,700 $0
Fixed asset additions $17,417 $43,272 $16,135 $45,652 $33,330
Total full costs (estimated) $2,541,839 $2,874,823 $3,135,462 $3,714,150 $3,552,902

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.7 1.8 2.2 1.3 1.9
Months of cash and investments 31.9 38.4 44.6 52.7 48.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 27.1 32.3 35.3 43.6 38.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $319,743 $399,973 $516,199 $315,206 $520,427
Investments $5,856,648 $7,929,380 $10,127,816 $12,753,026 $12,620,072
Receivables $1,794,520 $2,628,581 $3,756,758 $3,302,374 $4,100,466
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $143,733 $187,003 $201,899 $247,550 $280,881
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 83.7% 70.1% 71.9% 67.0% 68.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.1% 1.9% 4.6% 1.0% 1.1%
Unrestricted net assets $5,266,096 $7,053,505 $8,487,114 $10,895,639 $10,452,467
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,792,610 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $790,161 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $2,582,771 $3,772,870 $5,325,463 $5,408,437 $6,964,730
Total net assets $7,848,867 $10,826,375 $13,812,577 $16,304,076 $17,417,197

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Tracy Cook

Since 1998, attorney Tracy Cook has served as ProKids Executive Director, leading the effort to recruit, train and support CASA Volunteers – Court Appointed Special Advocates. By combining the compassion and advocacy efforts of these volunteers and ProKids staff, ProKids is a powerful voice in Hamilton County for abused and neglected children. A graduate of UC Law, Tracy first joined ProKids as a CASA Volunteer and continues to work as an attorney on ProKids cases. Under her leadership, 99% of ProKids children are safe from abuse and neglect. It’s a rate ProKids has maintained for more than two decades. Tracy has been recognized in a variety of ways, including as a Leading Woman in Law, as a Dada Rafiki honoree, and, most recently as a Cincinnati YWCA Career Woman of Achievement.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Prokids

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Prokids

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

MacKenzie Chavez

Jeb Head

Atkins & Pearce, Inc.

JoAnn Hagopian

Proctor & Gamble, Retired

T.D. Hughes

LaRosa’s Pizzeria

MacKenzie Chavez

Community Volunteer

Thomas Cuni

Cuni Ferguson & LeVay Co. LPA

Kelly Wittich

UBS FTB Financial Services

Diane Adamec

Proctor & Gamble, Retired

Jennifer Bastos

Castle House

Stephen Brown

Stock Yards Bank & Trust

William DeCamp

Radiant Solutions Group

Michael Hines

Build Collective of Coldwell Banker West Shell

Peter Klekamp

PLK Communities, LLC

Lynne Miller

Proctor & Gamble, Retired

Stephen Nesbitt

Ulmer & Berne LLP

Julie Wilson

Hamilton County Prosecutor’s Office, Retired

Grace Chung DiPaolo

Executive Eight Coaching & Consulting, LLC

Sandy Harte

Xavier University, Retired

Michelle Hudepohl

Coldwell Banker West Shell

Bob Berres

Procter & Gamble, Retired

Brent Gravlee

Clif Bar & Company

Tracy Hill

Procter & Gamble

Evie Joseph

Hyde Park Pediatrics, Retired

Phyllis McCallum

Community Volunteer

Beth McNeill

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Gail Moore

Procter & Gamble, Retired

Steve Nesbitt

Ulmer & Berene LLP

Ashley Roehm

Acosta

Sam Ross

Iconic Communications Group, Inc.

Hallam Sargeant

Avanade

Marcy Selva

Simpactful

Jay Shatz

Leadership Council for Nonprofits

Justin Tillson

Tire Discounters, Inc.

Lisa Tuck

The Tuck Firm, LLC

Wynndel Watts

IBM, Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/11/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/11/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.